Élisabeth Badinter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Elisabeth Badinter
Born March 5, 1944 (1944-03-05) (age 70)
Boulogne-Billancourt, France
Citizenship France
Known for Publicis
Net worth Increase US$ 1.8 billion (est.)[1]
Spouse(s) Robert Badinter (m. 1966)
Children 3
Relatives Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet (father)

Élisabeth Badinter (March 5, 1944,[2] born as Élisabeth Bleustein-Blanchet in Boulogne-Billancourt, Hauts-de-Seine) is a French author, historian, and professor of philosophy at the École Polytechnique in Paris.[3]

Biography[edit]

She is the daughter of Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet, founder of the Publicis Groupe, and the wife of Robert Badinter, a famous French lawyer, law professor and previous minister of justice.[4] They have one daughter and two sons, Simon and Benjamin Badinter, who are at the head of Médias et régie Europe, a subsidiary company of Publicis.[5]

According to Forbes, she is one of the most wealthy French citizens with a fortune of around 1.8 billion dollars in 2012.[6]

While her interests and writings are diverse, a 2010 Marianne news magazine poll named Badinter France's "most influential intellectual", primarily on the basis of her books on feminism and motherhood.[7]

Works[edit]

  • L'Amour en plus : histoire de l'amour maternel (XVIIe-XXe siècle), 1981, ISBN 2-253-02944-0
  • Les Goncourt : « Romanciers et historiens des femmes », foreword of « La Femme au XVIIe siècle d'Edmond et Jules de Goncourt », 1981,
  • Émilie, Émilie, L'ambition féminine au XVIIIe siècle, 1983, ISBN 2-08-210089-8
  • Les Remontrances de Malesherbes (1771–1775), 1985,
  • L'Un est l'autre, 1986, ISBN 2-7381-1364-8
  • Cahiers Suzanne Lilar, pp. 15–26, Paris, Gallimard, 1986, ISBN 2-07-070632-X
  • Condorcet. Un intellectuel en politique, 1988,
  • Correspondance inédite de Condorcet et Madame Suard (1771-1791), 1988,
  • Madame d'Épinay, Histoire de Madame de Montbrillant ou les Contreconfessions, foreword by d'Élisabeth Badinter, 1989,
  • Thomas, Diderot, Madame d'Épinay : Qu'est-ce qu'une femme ?, foreword by Élisabeth Badinter, 1989
  • Condorcet, Prudhomme, Guyomar : Paroles d'hommes (1790–1793), Élisabeth Badinter, 1989,
  • XY, de l'identité masculine, 1992, ISBN 2-253-09783-7
  • Madame du Châtelet, Discours sur le bonheur, foreword, 1997
  • Les Passions intellectuelles, tome 1 : Désirs de gloire (1735–1751), 1999,
  • Les Passions intellectuelles, tome 2 : L'exigence de dignité (1751–1762), 2002,
  • Les Passions intellectuelles, tome 3 : Volonté Pouvoir (1762-1778). 2007. ISBN 978-2-213-62643-7. 
  • Simone de Beauvoir, Marguerite Yourcenar, Nathalie Sarraute, 2002. Conference Élizabeth Badinter, Jacques Lassalle and Lucette Finas, ISBN 2-7177-2220-3
  • Fausse route, 2003, ISBN 2-253-11264-X
  • Dead End Feminism. 2006. ISBN 0-7456-3380-3.  Translated from Fausse route by Julia Borossa.
  • Madame du Châtelet, Madame d'Épinay : Ou l'Ambition féminine au XVIIIe siècle, 2006, ISBN 2-08-210563-6
  • Le conflit, la femme et la mère. 2010. ISBN 978-2-253-15755-7. 
  • The Conflict: How Modern Motherhood Undermines the Status of Women. 2012. ISBN 978-0-8050-9414-5.  Translated from Le Conflit by Adriana Hunter.

Honours[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Elisabeth Badinter & family". Forbes. March 2014. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  2. ^ "Badinter, Elisabeth". Current Biography Yearbook 2011. Ipswich, MA: H.W. Wilson. 2011. pp. 33–36. ISBN 9780824211219. 
  3. ^ Davies, Lizzy (February 12, 2010). "French philosopher says feminism under threat from 'good motherhood'". The Guardian (London). 
  4. ^ "Elisabeth Badinter", Jewish women Encyclopedia
  5. ^ Les petits soucis d’ISF des Badinter, Capital, 4 March 2014.
  6. ^ The World's Billionaires List, Forbes, March 2012.
  7. ^ Kramer, Jane (July 25, 2011). "Against Nature: Elisabeth Badinter’s contrarian feminism". The New Yorker. 
  8. ^ Sovereign Ordonnance n° 3.540 of 18 November 2011 : promotions or nominations in the Order of Cultural Merit

External links[edit]