Émile Reuter

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Émile Reuter
Prime Minister of Luxembourg
In office
28 September 1918 – 20 March 1925
Monarch Marie-Adélaïde
Charlotte
Preceded by Léon Kauffman
Succeeded by Pierre Prüm
Personal details
Born 2 June 1874
Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Died 14 February 1973(1973-02-14) (aged 98)
Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Political party Right
Religion Roman Catholicism

Émile Reuter (2 June 1874 – 14 February 1973) was a Luxembourgish politician. He was the 13th Prime Minister of Luxembourg, serving for six years, from 28 June 1918 until 20 March 1925.

After finishing school in 1893 at the Athénée de Luxembourg, Émile Reuter studied law in Strasbourg, Nancy and Paris from 1894 to 1898 and then registered at the bar. In 1903 he became president of the Association populaire catholique and in 1911 was elected to the Chamber of Deputies. In 1914 he was a founding member of the Right Party. Shortly before the end of World War I, on 28 September 1918 Reuter became prime minister and Director-General (Minister) for Foreign Affairs and the Interior. In 1925 there was a crisis in the government when the Chamber rejected the government's proposals to amalgamate the railway companies Guillaume-Luxembourg and Prince-Henri under Belgian direction. The Reuter Ministry then resigned. From 1926 to 1959 (apart from the war years) he was president of the Chamber of Deputies. Until 1964 he was also the first president of the Christian Social People's Party (CSV), founded in 1944. In 1957 he became ambassador of Luxembourg to the Holy See.

He died in 1973 in Luxembourg City. The Avenue Émile-Reuter was named after him in the city.

Political offices
Preceded by
Léon Kauffmann
Prime Minister of Luxembourg
1918–1925
Succeeded by
Pierre Prüm
Director-General for Foreign Affairs
1918–1925
Preceded by
René Blum
President of the Chamber of Deputies
1st time

1926–1944
Succeeded by
Nicolas Wirtgen
Preceded by
Nicolas Wirtgen
President of the Chamber of Deputies
2nd time

1945–1958
Succeeded by
Joseph Bech
Party political offices
New title
New party formed after World War II
President of the CSV
1945–1964
Succeeded by
Tony Biever