Étienne-Paschal Taché

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Sir Étienne Paschal Taché
Étienne-Paschal Taché.jpg
Born (1795-09-05)5 September 1795
St. Thomas, Lower Canada
Died 30 July 1865(1865-07-30) (aged 69)
St.Montmagny, Quebec
Occupation doctor, politician
Known for Father of Canadian Confederation

Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché (5 September 1795 – 30 July 1865) was a Canadian doctor, politician and one of the Fathers of Confederation.[1]

Born in St. Thomas, Lower Canada, in 1795, the third son of Charles Taché and Geneviève Michon, Taché studied at the Séminaire de Québec until the War of 1812 when he joined the 5th battalion of the incorporated militia as an ensign. He was later promoted to lieutenant and fought in the Chasseurs Canadiens. During the war, he started studying to become a doctor and continued his studies in Philadelphia after the war. He obtained his medical license in 1819 and practiced medicine in Montmagny.

Taché was elected to the new Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada in 1841 as a member from Canada East (Quebec) and held numerous posts in successive administrations, including, for a time, Premier (1856-1857, 1864-1865). In 1864, he formed the Great Coalition which was ultimately responsible for Canadian Confederation, and he presided over the Quebec City conference of 1864.

Taché's home in Montmagny, Quebec was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1990.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Fathers of Confederation". www.canadahistory.com. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  2. ^ Étienne-Paschal Taché House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2012.

References[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Sir Augustin-Norbert Morin
Joint Premiers of the Province of Canada - Canada East
1855-1857 (with Sir Allan McNab, 1855-1856, and Sir John A. Macdonald, 1856-1857)
Succeeded by
Sir George-Étienne Cartier
Preceded by
Antoine-Aimé Dorion
Joint Premiers of the Province of Canada - Canada East
1864-1865 (with Sir John A. Macdonald)
Succeeded by
Sir Narcisse-Fortunat Belleau