Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul

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Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
Location 8 cours Franklin Roosevelt
Marseille 13001
Bouches-du-Rhône, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Country France
Denomination Roman Catholic
History
Dedicated 1886
Architecture
Architect(s) François Reybaud
Architectural type Gothic architecture
Administration
Diocese Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Marseille
Clergy
Priest(s) Michel-Marie Zanotti-Sorkine

The Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul is a Roman Catholic church in Marseille. It is also known as Les Réformés.

Location[edit]

It is located off the top of the Canebière.[1][2] The exact address is 2-3 Cours Franklin Roosevelt, an avenue named for American President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).[1][3][4]

History[edit]

It was built on a demolished convent and chapel of Reformed Augustinians, which explains why it is commonly known as "Les Réformés" despite being a Roman Catholic church.[1][2] The church building itself was designed by the architect François Reybaud and the abbey Joseph-Guillaume Pougnet, and built from 1855 to 1886.[1][5] It is neogothic, with ogival curbs in the ceiling.[1] The architects took inspiration from the Reims Cathedral and the Amiens Cathedral.[5] The two arrows are 70 metre high.

The bronze gates were designed by Caras-Latour, the high altar was designed by Jules Cantini (1826-1916), and the stained windows were designed by Édouard Didron (1836-1902).[1] Additionally, sculptor Louis Botinelly (1883-1962) designed the statues of Joan of Arc and of Jesus.[1] As for the organ pipes, they were made by Joseph Merklin (1819–1905).[1]

In the 1980s, due to low attendance, it came under the threat of being demolished.[2] However, in recent years, it has a high attendance record.[2]

At present[edit]

The church building is open every day from 9AM to 12PM and from 1PM to 4:30PM, except on Sundays.[3] Mass is said every day at 6:30PM, except on Saturdays when it is also said at 12:10PM, and on Sundays when it is only said at 10:30AM.[3] On the last Sunday of November, Mass is said in Provençal dialect to celebrate the santon traditionally used in Christmas cribs in houses in Provence.[1]

The current priest is Fr Michel-Marie Zanotti-Sorkine.[3]

Gallery[edit]

Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul and the tram
Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul and the tram 
Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul from a distance
Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul from a distance 
Inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
Inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul 
Pipe organs made by Joseph Merklin inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
Pipe organs made by Joseph Merklin inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul 
Pulpit inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
Pulpit inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul 
Ceiling inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
Ceiling inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul 
High altar by Jules Cantini inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
High altar by Jules Cantini inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul 
Stained glass by Édouard Didron inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul
Stained glass inside the Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul 

Secondary sources[edit]

  • Antoine Ricard, Église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul à Marseille (impr. Vve P. Chauffard, 1867, 21 pages).[6]
  • Félix Vérany, Les Augustins réformés et l'église Saint-Vincent-de-Paul de Marseille (J. Chauffard, 1885, 288 pages).[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Dominique Auzias, Marseille 2013 Petit Futé, Le Petit Futé, 4 Apr 2013, p. 388 [1]
  2. ^ a b c d Jean Sévillia, Une foi à soulever la Canebière, Le Figaro, 18/04/2012
  3. ^ a b c d Église Catholique à Marseille
  4. ^ Google Maps
  5. ^ a b André Segond, Marseille ville impériale, Editions Autres Temps, 2010, p. 81 [2]
  6. ^ Google Books
  7. ^ Google Books

Coordinates: 43°17′56″N 5°23′09″E / 43.2988°N 5.3859°E / 43.2988; 5.3859