Étréham

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Étréham
Farm of the Marguerie and St. Romanus
Farm of the Marguerie and St. Romanus
Étréham is located in France
Étréham
Étréham
Coordinates: 49°19′22″N 0°47′45″W / 49.3228°N 0.7958°W / 49.3228; -0.7958Coordinates: 49°19′22″N 0°47′45″W / 49.3228°N 0.7958°W / 49.3228; -0.7958
Country France
Region Lower Normandy
Department Calvados
Arrondissement Bayeux
Canton Trévières
Intercommunality Trévières
Government
 • Mayor (2008–2014) Alain Cornière
Area1 4.24 km2 (1.64 sq mi)
Population (2008)2 264
 • Density 62/km2 (160/sq mi)
INSEE/Postal code 14256 / 14400
Elevation 12–68 m (39–223 ft)
(avg. 37 m or 121 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Étréham is a commune in the Calvados department in the Basse-Normandie region in northwestern France.

Toponymy[edit]

Oesterham in 1350.

Probably Old Saxon *wester or Old English westre related to "west" (Old High German westar, west-; see Westerham, Kent) and hām "home, hamlet"[1] or, less probably, Old Saxon ōstar related to "east" (see Ouistreham). This place name corresponds to Saxon settlements in Bayeux and in the surrounding Bessin Region (the so-called Otlinga Saxonia) in the 5 - 6th century or to Anglo-Scandinavian settlements later in the 10th.

History[edit]

World War II[edit]

The village was bombed on 8 June 1944, two days after the D-Day landings, by the Big Red One (U.S. First Division). It was liberated one day later, and about 600 German soldiers were taken prisoner. After the liberation, the Allies used the place called Mont Cauvin in the same commune to store their oil until the conquest of Cherbourg.

Population[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1962 197 —    
1968 202 +2.5%
1975 187 −7.4%
1982 225 +20.3%
1990 236 +4.9%
1999 233 −1.3%
2008 264 +13.3%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ René Lepelley, Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de communes de Normandie, Presses Universitaires de Caen 1993.