NSYNC in Concert

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NSYNC in Concert
Nsync tourpass.jpg
Tour by NSYNC
Associated album NSYNC
Start date June 11, 1998 (1998-06-11)
End date January 1, 2000 (2000-01-01)
Legs 5
Shows 209 in North America
NSYNC concert chronology
For the Girl Tour
(1997)
NSYNC in Concert
(1998–2000)
No Strings Attached Tour
(2000–01)

NSYNC in Concert (also known as the Second II None Tour,[1] Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now Tour,[2] Boys of Summer Tour[3] and The Winter Shows) is the second concert tour by American boy band, NSYNC. Primarily visiting North America, the tour supported the band's debut studio album, NSYNC. The trek lasted eighteen months, playing over two hundred concerts in over one hundred cities. In 1998, the tour was nominated for "Best New Artist Tour" by Pollstar Concert Industry Awards.[4] It also became one of the biggest tours in 1999, earning over $50 million.[5] Supporting the band on the tour were newcomers Britney Spears, B*Witched and Mandy Moore along with music veterans Jordan Knight, Shanice and The Sugarhill Gang.

Background[edit]

After completing a promotional tour for their debut album, the band announced their first tour in North America. Previously, the band toured Germany for their "For the Girl Tour" in 1997. The summer outing saw the band playing in nightclubs, state fairs and radio music festivals. After the airing of their Disney Channel concert special, "NSYNC: Live in Concert", the band's popularity grew in the United States and additional dates were added to the tour. Now known as the "Second II None Tour", the band were now playing theatres and auditoriums. Before the tour began in November 1998, the band become the opening act for Janet Jackson's "The Velvet Rope World Tour" during concerts in October 1998.[6]

During this time, the band was involved in a legal battle with their former manager Lou Pearlman and transitioning from RCA to Jive Records.[7] The leg ended in February 1999, after performing at a radio music festival in San Jose, California. Around this time, bandmember Lance Bass expressed the band would expanded their upcoming tour to the United Kingdom. However, this did not come to fruition. The next leg of the tour, known as "Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now Tour" began in the spring of 1999. The band were now playing arenas in the United States. The tour was sponsored by Oxy Balance.[8] During an interview with the Hartford Courant, band member JC Chasez described the tour as:

"The concerts, yeah, are loud and crazy, and people scream and everything like that but it's fun. It's all in good fun. The core of the show is the same, the same old singing and dancing, NSYNC style: a high-energy, very personal performance".[9]

While performing a concert in New Haven, Connecticut, local radio station WKCI-FM declared March 13, 1999 as "NSYNC Day".[10] While touring in Florida, Bass became ill and missed the concerts in Tampa and Sunrise.[11] The tour was expanded once again to the summer, now called the "Boys of Summer Tour". The band were now playing amphitheatres and stadiums. The shows were sponsored by Clairol Herbal Essence. For the August concert in Denver, the band allowed students of Columbine High School to attend the concert for free. Towards the end of the leg, the band were forced to cancel concerts due to schedule conflicts relating to their lawsuit. The group made up the dates in their final tour expansion known as "The Winter Shows". During an AOL chat with fans, Chasez stated they were already preparing for their upcoming tour in 2000. He also expressed hoping to tour the United Kingdom, Continental Europe, Australia and Japan. During this leg, the band performed their new singles, "Bye Bye Bye" and "Music of My Heart". The leg ended with a New Year's Eve concert in Honolulu.

Opening acts[edit]

Set list[edit]

Tour dates[edit]

NSYNC in Concert
Date City Country Venue
North America—Leg 1[24]
June 11, 1998 Orlando United States House of Blues
June 12, 1998
June 13, 1998[A] Anaheim Edison International Field of Anaheim
June 19, 1998 Arlington Music Mill Amphitheater
June 21, 1998[B] Burlington Burlington Memorial Auditorium
June 27, 1998[C] Council Bluffs Westfair Amphitheatre
June 28, 1998[D] Tinley Park New World Music Theater
July 4, 1998[E] St. Petersburg Straub Park
July 5, 1998 Vancouver Canada Vancouver Forum
July 6, 1998
July 8, 1998 Edmonton Shaw Conference Centre
July 9, 1998 Calgary Max Bell Centre
July 10, 1998 Saskatoon Saskatoon Centennial Auditorium
July 11, 1998 Winnipeg Walker Theatre
July 12, 1998 Thunder Bay Thunder Bay Community Auditorium
July 15, 1998 London Centennial Hall
July 16, 1998 Toronto Molson Amphitheatre
July 18, 1998 Montreal Le Spectrum de Montréal
July 19, 1998 Quebec City Salle Albert-Rousseau
July 20, 1998 Ottawa Ottawa Congress Centre
July 22, 1998[F] Kingsport United States Johnson Stadium
July 23, 1998 Scranton Tink's Entertainment Complex
July 24, 1998 Plainview The Vanderbilt
July 25, 1998 Philadelphia Electric Factory
July 26, 1998 Washington, D.C. Warner Theatre
July 28, 1998 Chicago House of Blues
July 29, 1998 Cleveland Odeon Concert Club
July 30, 1998
July 31, 1998 Royal Oak Royal Oak Music Theatre
August 1, 1998 Flint IMA Sports Arena
August 2, 1998[G] Janesville Rock County Fairgrounds
August 3, 1998[H] San Jose Exposition Hall
August 7, 1998[I] Kellogg Silver Mountain Amphitheatre
August 8, 1998 Ridgefield Clark County Event Center
August 11, 1998 Lawrence Granada Theater
August 13, 1998[J] Sioux Falls Lyon Fairgrounds
August 18, 1998[K] Springfield Illinois State Fairgrounds
August 21, 1998[L] Dallas Starplex Amphitheatre
August 24, 1998[M] Boise Expo Idaho
August 25, 1998 Walker DeltaPlex Arena
September 11, 1998[N] Hutchinson Kansas State Fairgrounds
September 12, 1998 Camden Blockbuster-Sony Music Entertainment Centre
September 13, 1998 Salt Lake City Utah State Fairpark
September 18, 1998 Dallas House of Blues
September 23, 1998[O] Nashville Nashville Convention Center
Second II None Tour
Date City Country Venue
North America—Leg 2[14][25]
November 17, 1998 Kissimmee United States Tupperware Convention Center
November 18, 1998
November 19, 1998 Tampa USF Sun Dome
November 20, 1998[P] Pompano Beach Pompano Park
November 22, 1998 Atlanta Fox Theatre
November 24, 1998 Richmond Landmark Theater
November 25, 1998 Westbury Westbury Music Fair
November 27, 1998 Newark Prudential Hall
November 28, 1998 Upper Darby Township Tower Theater
November 29, 1998 Albany Palace Theatre
November 30, 1998 Cincinnati Seton High School Theater
December 1, 1998 Columbus Franklin County Veterans Memorial Auditorium
December 2, 1998 Kalamazoo Wings Stadium
December 3, 1998 Indianapolis Murat Theatre
December 4, 1998 Cleveland CSU Convocation Center
December 5, 1998 Auburn Hills The Palace of Auburn Hills
December 8, 1998 Milwaukee Riverside Theater
December 9, 1998 St. Louis American Theater
December 10, 1998
December 11, 1998 Nashville Ryman Auditorium
December 12, 1998 Chattanooga Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium
December 13, 1998 Louisville Palace Theatre
December 17, 1998[Q] New York City Madison Square Garden
December 18, 1998[Q] San Jose San Jose Arena
December 27, 1998 Minneapolis Orpheum Theatre
December 28, 1998 Des Moines Civic Center of Greater Des Moines
December 29, 1998 Kansas City Memorial Hall
December 30, 1998 Dallas Bronco Bowl
December 31, 1998 Las Vegas Thomas & Mack Center
January 1, 1999
January 2, 1999 Phoenix Celebrity Theatre
January 3, 1999 San Diego Cox Arena at Aztec Bowl
January 5, 1999 Los Angeles Universal Amphitheatre
January 8, 1999
January 9, 1999 Sacramento Sacramento Memorial Auditorium
January 10, 1999 Berkeley Berkeley Community Theatre
January 13, 1999 Denver McNichols Sports Arena
January 15, 1999 Tulsa Brady Theater
January 16, 1999 Baton Rouge Riverside Centroplex
January 17, 1999 Biloxi Mississippi Coast Coliseum
February 7, 1999[R] Honolulu Aloha Stadium
February 26, 1999[S] San Jose San Jose Arena
Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now Tour
Date City Country Venue
North America—Leg 3[26][27][28]
March 3, 1999 Jacksonville United States Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Coliseum
March 5, 1999 Greenville BI-LO Center
March 6, 1999 Chapel Hill Dean Smith Center
March 7, 1999 Charleston Charleston Civic Center
March 8, 1999 Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Civic Arena
March 11, 1999 Providence Providence Civic Center
March 12, 1999 Uniondale Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum
March 13, 1999 New Haven New Haven Coliseum
March 14, 1999 Toronto Canada Maple Leaf Gardens
March 15, 1999 Albany United States Pepsi Arena
March 16, 1999 Boston FleetCenter
March 18, 1999 Philadelphia First Union Center
March 19, 1999 Washington, D.C. MCI Center
March 20, 1999 Hampton Hampton Coliseum
March 21, 1999 Charlotte Charlotte Coliseum
March 23, 1999 Columbus Value City Arena
March 24, 1999 Cleveland Gund Arena
March 25, 1999 Auburn Hills The Palace of Auburn Hills
March 26, 1999 Rosemont Rosemont Horizon
March 27, 1999
March 28, 1999 Grand Rapids Van Andel Arena
March 30, 1999 Nashville Gaylord Entertainment Center
April 1, 1999 Kansas City Kemper Arena
April 2, 1999 St. Louis Kiel Center
April 3, 1999 Cincinnati The Crown
April 6, 1999 Lafayette Cajundome
April 7, 1999 Houston Compaq Center
April 8, 1999 Dallas Reunion Arena
April 9, 1999 Oklahoma City Myriad Convention Center Arena
April 10, 1999 Valley Center Britt Brown Arena
April 13, 1999 Phoenix America West Arena
April 15, 1999 San Diego Cox Arena at Aztec Bowl
April 16, 1999 Inglewood Great Western Forum
April 17, 1999 Las Vegas MGM Grand Garden Arena
April 18, 1999 Anaheim Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim
April 19, 1999 Oakland The Arena in Oakland
April 22, 1999 Portland Rose Garden
April 23, 1999 Tacoma Tacoma Dome
April 24, 1999 Seattle KeyArena
April 25, 1999 Spokane Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena
April 27, 1999 Nampa Idaho Center
April 28, 1999 Salt Lake City Delta Center
April 30, 1999 Colorado Springs World Arena
May 2, 1999 Omaha Omaha Civic Auditorium
May 3, 1999 Des Moines Veterans Memorial Auditorium
May 4, 1999 Moline The MARK of the Quad Cities
May 6, 1999 Minneapolis Target Center
May 7, 1999 Madison Kohl Center
May 8, 1999 Milwaukee Wisconsin Center Arena
May 9, 1999 Louisville Freedom Hall
May 10, 1999 Knoxville Thompson–Boling Arena
May 12, 1999[T] Orlando Hollywood Boulevard
May 13, 1999 Orlando Arena
May 14, 1999 Tampa Ice Palace
May 15, 1999 Sunrise National Car Rental Center
May 16, 1999 West Palm Beach Coral Sky Amphitheater
May 18, 1999 Sunrise National Car Rental Center
May 29, 1999[C] Council Bluffs Westfair Amphitheatre
June 5, 1999[U] Mansfield Tweeter Center for the Performing Arts
June 19, 1999[D] Joliet Route 66 Raceway
Boys of Summer Tour
Date City Country Venue
North America—Leg 4[3][26][27][29][30]
July 2, 1999 Sunrise United States National Car Rental Center
July 5, 1999 Virginia Beach GTE Virginia Beach Amphitheater
July 6, 1999
July 7, 1999
July 8, 1999 Camden Blockbuster-Sony Music Entertainment Centre
July 9, 1999
July 10, 1999 Burgettstown Coca-Cola Star Lake Amphitheater
July 11, 1999
July 13, 1999 Wantagh Jones Beach Amphitheater
July 14, 1999
July 15, 1999
July 16, 1999
July 17, 1999 Holmdel Township PNC Bank Arts Center
July 18, 1999
July 20, 1999 Darien Darien Lake Performing Arts Center
July 22, 1999 Scranton Montage Mountain Amphitheater
July 23, 1999 Hershey Hersheypark Stadium
July 24, 1999 Mansfield Tweeter Center for the Performing Arts
July 25, 1999
July 27, 1999 Hartford Meadows Music Theater
July 28, 1999 Bristow Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge
July 29, 1999 Columbus Polaris Amphitheater
July 31, 1999 Pontiac Pontiac Silverdome
August 2, 1999 Noblesville Deer Creek Music Center
August 4, 1999 Nashville First American Music Center
August 5, 1999 Maryland Heights Riverport Amphitheater
August 6, 1999 Rosemont Rosemont Horizon
August 7, 1999
August 8, 1999 Milwaukee Marcus Amphitheater
August 9, 1999 Los Angeles[V] Universal Amphitheatre
Chula Vista[W] Coors Amphitheatre
August 10, 1999 Bonner Springs Sandstone Amphitheater
August 12, 1999 New Orleans Louisiana Superdome
August 13, 1999 The Woodlands Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion
August 14, 1999 Irving Texas Stadium
August 16, 1999 San Antonio Alamodome
August 18, 1999 Phoenix Blockbuster Desert Sky Pavilion
August 19, 1999 Irvine Irvine Meadows
August 20, 1999 San Bernardino Blockbuster Pavilion
August 21, 1999 Mountain View Shoreline Amphitheatre
August 23, 1999 Denver McNichols Sports Arena
August 26, 1999 Atlanta Coca-Cola Lakewood Amphitheatre
August 27, 1999
August 28, 1999 Charlotte Blockbuster Pavilion
August 29, 1999 Raleigh Alltel Pavilion at Walnut Creek
August 31, 1999 Jackson Mississippi Coliseum
September 1, 1999 Memphis Pyramid Arena
September 2, 1999 Cincinnati Riverbend Music Center
September 3, 1999 Cuyahoga Falls Blossom Music Center
September 4, 1999 Toronto Canada Molson Amphitheatre
The Winter Shows
Date City Country Venue
North America—Leg 5[27][29][31]
November 26, 1999 Las Vegas United States MGM Grand Garden Arena
November 27, 1999
November 28, 1999 Reno Lawlor Events Center
November 29, 1999 Oakland The Arena in Oakland
November 30, 1999 Sacramento ARCO Arena
December 3, 1999 Fargo Fargodome
December 4, 1999 Winnipeg Canada Winnipeg Arena
December 7, 1999 Calgary Canadian Airlines Saddledome
December 8, 1999 Edmonton Skyreach Centre
December 30, 1999 Honolulu United States Blaisdell Arena
December 31, 1999
January 1, 2000
Music festivals and other miscellaneous performances
Cancellations and rescheduled shows
March 9, 1999 Toronto, Canada Maple Leaf Gardens Rescheduled to March 14, 1999
May 9, 1999 Louisville, Kentucky Louisville Gardens Moved to Freedom Hall
January 13, 1999 Denver, Colorado Mammoth Events Center Moved to McNichols Sports Arena
July 8, 1999 Bristow, Virginia Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge Rescheduled to July 28, 1999
July 28, 1999 Columbus, Ohio Polaris Amphitheater Rescheduled to July 29, 1999
July 29, 1999 Cincinnati, Ohio Riverbend Music Center Rescheduled to September 2, 1999
August 2, 1999 Noblesville, Indiana Deer Creek Music Center Rescheduled to Aug 2, 1999
August 20, 1999 Mountain View, California Shoreline Amphitheatre Rescheduled to August 21, 1999
August 21, 1999 Concord, California Concord Pavilion Rescheduled to September 15, 1999
August 24, 1999 Morrison, Colorado Red Rocks Amphitheatre Rescheduled to August 23, 1999 and moved to the McNichols Sports Arena in Denver, Colorado[42]
August 26, 1999 Memphis, Tennessee Pyramid Arena Rescheduled to September 1, 1999
September 5, 1999 Montreal, Canada Molson Centre Cancelled
September 14, 1999 Sacramento, California ARCO Arena Rescheduled to November 30, 1999
September 15, 1999 Concord, California Concord Pavilion Rescheduled to November 29, 1999 and moved to The Arena in Oakland in Oakland, California
September 16, 1999 Reno, Nevada Lawlor Events Center Rescheduled to November 28, 1999
September 17, 1999 Las Vegas, Nevada MGM Grand Garden Arena Rescheduled to November 26, 1999
September 18, 1999 Las Vegas, Nevada MGM Grand Garden Arena Rescheduled to November 27, 1999

Box office score data[edit]

Venue City Tickets sold / Available Gross revenue
Universal Amphitheatre Los Angeles 12,365 / 12,365 (100%) $297,330[43]
McNichols Sports Arena Denver 10,793 / 10,793 (100%) $260,170[43]
Riverside Centroplex Baton Rouge 8,799 / 8,799 (100%) $233,174[43]
Mississippi Coast Coliseum Biloxi 10,336 / 10,336 (100%) $273,904[43]
Pittsburgh Civic Arena Pittsburgh 13,802 / 13,802 (100%) $392,981[44]
Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum Uniondale 15,937 / 15,937 (100%) $480,954[44]
Pepsi Arena Albany 13,855 / 13,855 (100%) $367,450[45]
First Union Center Philadelphia 15,950 / 15,950 (100%) $454,575[45]
Rosemont Horizon Rosemont 27,954 / 27,954 (100%) $876,350[46]
The Arena in Oakland Oakland 14,115 / 14,115 (100%) $435,055[47]
Freedom Hall Louisville 16,655 / 16,655 (100%) $435,575[47]
Thompson–Boling Arena Knoxville 14,833 / 14,833 (100%) $450,835[48]
Ice Palace Tampa 18,333 / 18,333 (100%) $555,175[48]
Blockbuster-Sony Music Entertainment Centre Camden 44,861 / 49,858 (90%) $1,241,327[49]
Coca-Cola Star Lake Amphitheater Burgettstown 45,598 / 45,598 (100%) $1,274,727[50]
Jones Beach Amphitheater Wantagh 57,193 / 57,193 (100%) $1,921,763[50]
PNC Bank Arts Center Holmdel Township 34,064 / 34,064 (100%) $1,011,078[49]
Hersheypark Stadium Hershey 27,910 / 27,910 (100%) $922,373[51]
Pontiac Silverdome Pontiac 48,163 / 55,626 (86%) $1,528,735[52]
Louisiana Superdome New Orleans 38,599 / 38,599 (100%) $1,254,468[53]
Texas Stadium Irving 35,059 / 37,288 (94%) $1,282,429[54]
Alamodome San Antonio 25,078 / 25,230 (99%) $716,650[54]
TOTAL 550,252 / 565,093 (97%) $16,667,078

Broadcasts and recordings[edit]

The band's performance at Disney's "Summer Jam" was filmed on May 12, 1999 and aired on ABC in June. Their performances at "Summer Music Mania" and "Teenapolooza" were aired on UPN on August 31, 1999. The July 2 performance at the National Car Rental Center was filmed was for a PPV special entitled, "'NSYNC 'N Concert". The concert was presented by WAM! America's Kidz Network and was made available on September 11, 1999.

Critical reception[edit]

Overall, the tour received positive elucidation from music critics and concertgoers. Gord Westmacott (London Free Press) writes the boy band threw their female fans into a frenzy, at the Centennial Hall in London, Ontario. He continues, "All five returned to the stage for an a cappella medley of Bee Gees' songs, including 'Jive Talking' and 'How Deep Is Your Love', a move which seemed to win points with the parents and proved that yes, they really can sing. But it was the up-tempo material that drew the best response, as the members bounced around the stage in tightly choreographed dance routines, proving that they can dance too—or at least strut really well. And there was no question they knew exactly how to play the crowd, providing just enough pelvic thrusts amid the ernest and squeaky-clean production".[12]

Kiernan Grant (Toronto Sun) enjoyed the performance at the Molson Amphitheatre. He says, "Imagine the fever pitch when their helmets were dropped to reveal heart-throbs JC, Justin, Joey, Chris, and Lance—NSYNC in the flesh. Of course, there was still a heavy layer of Gortex—gloves included—to come off as the track-suited NSYNC strutted about to tunes from their self-titled debut album. The group delighted their fans with their fluid and casual dance moves, hootin' and hollerin' and just-this-side-of-bad-boy posturing".[55] Mike Ross (Music Express) called the performance at the Skyreach Centre a "fusion of a rock 'n roll concert and a visit to Disneyland. He explains, "The crowd was on its feet—screaming, screaming, all that screaming ... There was actually something to scream about. Say what you want about boy-groups with millions of dollars in production at their disposal. They may be pinnacle of pop fluff, but they're not putting on boring concerts".[23]

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