(119951) 2002 KX14

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(119951) 2002 KX14
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Michael E. Brown, Chad Trujillo
Discovery date May 17, 2002
Designations
MPC designation (119951) 2002 KX14
none
Minor planet category TNO
cubewano[2]
plutino-like
Orbital characteristics[1][2]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 6081.698 Gm (40.654 AU)
Perihelion 5594.029 Gm (37.394 AU)
5837.864 Gm (39.024 AU)
Eccentricity 0.042
89041.246 d (243.78 a)
4.77 km/s
253.196°
Inclination 0.401°
286.961°
66.276°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions <562+220
−182
(2007) km[3]
Mass 2.0×1020? kg
Mean density
2.0? g/cm3
0.1621? m/s2
0.3066? km/s
? d
Albedo >0.08+0.09
−0.04
[3]
Temperature ≈45 K
Spectral type
?
20.4 (opposition)[4][5]
4.5[1]

(119951) 2002 KX14, also written as 2002 KX14, is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) residing within the Kuiper belt. It was discovered on May 17, 2002 by Michael E. Brown and Chad Trujillo.[citation needed]

It has a semi-major axis, orbital period and orbital eccentricity close to that of a plutino.[6] The orbital periods of plutinos cluster around 247.2 years (1.5 x Neptune's orbital period). However, (119951) 2002 KX14 is not classified as a plutino, since is not in resonance with Neptune, and it may have formed near its present quasi-circular orbit lying almost perfectly on the ecliptic. It may have remained dynamically cold and thus its orbit may not be a direct result of significant perturbations during Neptune's outward planetary migration. The Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) currently shows it as a cubewano (classical) based on a 10 million year integration of the orbit.[2]

2002KX14-orbit.png

It comes to opposition in late May at an apparent magnitude of 20.4.[4][5] This makes it about 360 times fainter than Pluto.[7]

The evolution of the semi-major axis of both Pluto (pink) and (119951) 2002 KX14 (blue).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 119951 (2002 KX14)". (last obs). 2006-04-26. Retrieved 2008-07-16. 
  2. ^ a b c Marc W. Buie (2006-04-26). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 119951". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2008-07-16. 
  3. ^ a b Stansberry, John; et al. (2007). "Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope". arXiv:astro-ph/0702538 [astro-ph].
  4. ^ a b "(119951) 2002 KX14". (epoch) Minor Planet Center. 2010-07-23. Retrieved 2010-10-24. 
  5. ^ a b "HORIZONS Web-Interface". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  6. ^ John S. Lewis (2004). "Plutinos 2nd paragraph". Physics and Chemistry of the Solar System. Academic Press. p. 410. ISBN 978-0-12-446744-6. 
  7. ^ (5th root of 100)^(20.4-14=363)

External links[edit]