(145452) 2005 RN43

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(145452) 2005 RN43
Discovery
Discovered by A. C. Becker, A. W. Puckett, and J. Kubica[1]
Discovery date September 10, 2005
Designations
MPC designation (145452) 2005 RN43
Minor planet category TNO
Cubewano[2][3]
Extended (DES)[4]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 20 070 410
Aphelion 42.547 AU
Perihelion 40.631 AU
Semi-major axis 41.589 AU
Eccentricity 0.023
Orbital period 97 760.8 days (267.6 years)
Mean anomaly 335.9°
Inclination 19.3°
Longitude of ascending node 186.9°
Argument of perihelion 165.2°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 679+55
−73
 km
[5]
Sidereal rotation period 5.62 h[2]
Apparent magnitude 20.1[6]
Absolute magnitude (H) 3.9[2]

(145452) 2005 RN43, also written as (145452) 2005 RN43, is a classical Kuiper belt object. It has an estimated diameter of 679+55
−73
 km
.[5] It was discovered by Andrew C. Becker, Andrew W. Puckett, and Jeremy M. Kubica on September 10, 2005 at Apache Point Observatory in Sunspot, New Mexico.

Mike Brown's website lists it as highly likely a dwarf planet.[7]

Classification[edit]

The Minor Planet Center (MPC) classifies it as a cubewano.[3] But since this object has an inclination of 19.3°, and it is unknown how it acquired this moderate inclination,[citation needed] the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) classifies it as scattered-extended.[4]

It has been observed 119 times over 13 oppositions with precovery images back to 1954.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ List Of Transneptunian Objects
  2. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 145452 (2005 RN43)". 2006-11-02 last obs. Retrieved 2009-08-28. 
  3. ^ a b "MPEC 2009-R09 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 September 16.0 TT)". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2009-09-04. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  4. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (2008-08-09 using 220 of 221 observations). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 145452". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-10-04. 
  5. ^ a b Vilenius, E., Kiss, C., Mommert, M. et al. (April 4, 2012). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region VI. Herschel/PACS observations and thermal modeling of 19 classical Kuiper belt objects". Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  6. ^ "AstDys (145452) 2005RN43 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2009-12-07. 
  7. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2011-08-25. 

External links[edit]