174567 Varda

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from (174567) 2003 MW12)
Jump to: navigation, search
Varda
Discovery[2]
Discovered by J. A. Larsen[1]
Discovery date June 21, 2003
Designations
MPC designation (174567) Varda
2003 MW12
TNO (cubewano)[3]
SCATEXTD[4]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 52.284 AU
(7822 million km)
Perihelion 39.622 AU
(5927 million km)
45.953 AU
(6874 million km)
Eccentricity 0.138
113779.342 d (311.51 a)
4.37 km/s
257.434°
Inclination 21.494°
184.009°
181.811°
Known satellites 1
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 705+81
−75
 km
[5]
Mass (2.65±0.03)×1020 kg[5][a]
Mean density
1.25+0.40
−0.43
 g/cm3
[5][a]
5.9 h[2]
Albedo 0.102+0.024
−0.024
Temperature ≈ 41 K
20.5[6]
3.61±0.05[5]
3.4[2]

174567 Varda /ˈvɑrdə/ (Quenya: [ˈvarda]), provisional designation 2003 MW12, is a trans-Neptunian object with an absolute magnitude of 3.5.[2] It is highly likely to be a dwarf planet.[7] It was discovered on June 21, 2003 by Jeffrey A. Larsen with the Spacewatch telescope.[8]

It is currently 47.5 AU from the Sun,[6] and will come to perihelion around November 2096.[4][9] It has been observed 68 times over 14 oppositions with precovery images back to 1980.[2]

Satellite[edit]

A satellite, Ilmarë /ˈɪlmər/ (stress on the first syllable, Quenya: [ˈilmarɛ]), or Varda I, was discovered in an image obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope on 26 April 2009, and reported in 2011. It is estimated to be 361+42
−38
 km
in diameter (about 50% that of its primary).[5]

Name[edit]

Names for Varda and its moon were announced on 16 January 2014. Varda is the queen of the Valar, creator of the stars, and principal goddess of the elves in J.R.R. Tolkien's fictional mythology. Ilmarë is a chief of the Maiar and Varda's handmaiden.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Assuming Varda and Ilmarë have equal albedos and equal densities

References[edit]

  1. ^ List Of Transneptunian Objects
  2. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 174567 (2003 MW12)" (2007-06-14 last obs). Retrieved 2008-12-08. 
  3. ^ "MPEC 2009-P26 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 AUG. 17.0 TT)". Minor Planet Center. 2009-08-07. Retrieved 2009-08-24. 
  4. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (2008-04-15). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 174567". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-08-24. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region X. Analysis of classical Kuiper belt objects from Herschel and Spitzer observations (2014)
  6. ^ a b "AstDys (174567) 2003MW12 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Archived from the original on 2009-04-18. Retrieved 2009-03-22. 
  7. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2011-08-25. 
  8. ^ Larsen, Jeffrey A.; Roe, Eric S.; Albert, C. Elise et al. (2007). "The Search for Distant Objects in the Solar System Using Spacewatch". The Astronomical Journal 133 (4): 1247–1270. Bibcode:2007AJ....133.1247L. doi:10.1086/511155. 
  9. ^ "HORIZONS Web-Interface". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2009-08-24. 
  10. ^ M.P.C. 86285, 2014 Jan. 16, p. 431

External links[edit]