(229762) 2007 UK126

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(229762) 2007 UK126
2007 UK126 photographed by the UK Schmidt Telescope.
(229762) 2007 UK126 photographed by the UK Schmidt Telescope.
Discovery[1]
Discovered by M. E. Schwamb
M. E. Brown
D. L. Rabinowitz
Discovery date October 19, 2007
Designations
MPC designation (229762) 2007 UK126
Minor planet category Scat-ext[2][3]
Orbital characteristics[6]
Epoch September 30, 2012 (JD 2456200.5)
Aphelion 111.1426 AU (Q)
Perihelion 37.6252 AU (q)
Semi-major axis 74.3839 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.4942
Orbital period 640.55 a (234324.7 d)
Mean anomaly 341.3684 (M)
Inclination 23.3494
Longitude of ascending node 131.2234
Argument of perihelion 345.7998
Known satellites 1[4][5]
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 599±77 km[5]
612 km[7]
Albedo 0.167+0.058
−0.038
[5]
Apparent magnitude 20.8[1]
Absolute magnitude (H) 3.69±0.10[5]
3.43[6]

(229762) 2007 UK126, also written as (229762) 2007 UK126, is a scattered disc object (SDO) with a bright absolute magnitude of 3.7.[5] This makes it probably a dwarf planet. As of August 2011, Mike Brown lists it as highly likely a dwarf planet.[8] Its light-curve amplitude is estimated to be Δm=0.111 mag.[9]

Its orbital eccentricity of 0.49 suggests that it was gravitationally scattered onto its eccentric orbit. It will come to perihelion in February 2046.[6]

It has been observed 73 times over 11 oppositions with precovery images back to 1982.[6]

It has been reported that 2007 UK126 has a satellite, but a mass estimate has not been made.[5] The magnitude difference between the primary and the satellite is 3.79 mag. The satellite has a tentative diameter of 139 km, a semi-major axis of 3600 km, and an orbital period of 3.7 d.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2007 UK126". Minor Planet Electronic Circ., 2008-D38 (2008). Retrieved 2008-07-11. 
  2. ^ Marc W. Buie (2012-05-08). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 229762". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  3. ^ "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  4. ^ a b (229762) 2007 UK126, Johnston's Archive. Last updated 20 September 2011
  5. ^ a b c d e f Müller, T. G.; Lellouch, E.; Böhnhardt, H.; Stansberry, J.; Barucci, A.; Crovisier, J.; Delsanti, A.; Doressoundiram, A.; Dotto, E.; Duffard, R.; Fornasier, S.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Hainaut, O.; Harris, A. W.; Hartogh, P.; Hestroffer, D.; Horner, J.; Jewitt, D.; Kidger, M.; Kiss, C.; Lacerda, P.; Lara, L.; Lim, T.; Mueller, M.; Moreno, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Rengel, M.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Swinyard, B. (2009). "TNOs are Cool: A Survey of the Transneptunian Region". Earth, Moon, and Planets 105 (2–4): 209. Bibcode:2009EM&P..105..209M. doi:10.1007/s11038-009-9307-x.  edit
  6. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 229762 (2007 UK126)". 2013-12-01 last obs (arc=31 yr). Retrieved 2012-08-27. 
  7. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)"
  8. ^ Michael E. Brown (May 7, 2012). "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  9. ^ Roland, S., Bruzzone, S., Nowajewski, P., Tancredi, G., Barrera, L., Martinez, M., Troncoso, P., & Vasquez, S. (2009). Lightcurves of Icy “Dwarf Planets” (Plutoids)

External links[edit]