(26308) 1998 SM165

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(26308) 1998 SM165
Discovery
Discovered by Nichole M. Danzl[1]
Discovery date September 16, 1998
Designations
MPC designation (26308) 1998 SM165
none
Minor planet category twotino[2][3]
Kozai
Orbital characteristics[6]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 65.154 AU (9746.966 Gm)
Perihelion 29.902 AU (4473.234 Gm)
47.528 AU (7110.100 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.371
327.67 a (119,680.629 d)
4.17 km/s
35.495°
Inclination 13.515°
183.158°
130.468°
Known satellites S/2001 (26308) 1[4]
( 96±12 km in diameter)[5]
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 287±36 km(primary)[5]
Mean density
0.51+0.29
−0.14
 g/cm3
[5]
8.40±0.05 h[5]
Albedo 0.07±0.02[5]
Temperature ~40 K
5.8

(26308) 1998 SM165, also written as (26308) 1998 SM165, is a binary trans-Neptunian object (TNO) that resides in the Kuiper belt. It was discovered on September 16, 1998, by Nichole M. Danzl. It is in a 1:2 orbital resonance with the planet Neptune.

Twotino[edit]

1998SM165-orbit.gif
1998 SM165 has a semi-major axis (average distance from the Sun) near the edge of the classical belt. Both the Minor Planet Center (MPC) and the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) list this trans-Neptunian object as a twotino.[2][3] For every one orbit that a twotino makes, Neptune orbits twice.

Physical characteristics[edit]

The observations with the infrared Spitzer Space Telescope combined with the orbits established using the Hubble Telescope allow the estimation of the density, assuming the components of equal albedo.

The resulting estimate of 0.51+0.29
−0.14
 g/cm3
[5] is similar to the density of the binary plutino (47171) 1999 TC36 (0.3–0.8 g/cm3[7]) and Saturn’s moon Hyperion (0.567±0.102 g/cm3[8]) Such a low density is indicative of a highly porous composition dominated by ice.[5]

Satellite[edit]

Designated S/2001 (26308) 1, it is about 96 ± 12 km (59.7 ± 7.5 mi) in diameter and it orbits its primary at a distance of 11,310 ± 110 km (7,028 ± 68 mi). Assuming a circular orbit, this takes 130.1±1 days to complete one orbit.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List Of Transneptunian Objects". 
  2. ^ a b "MPEC 2009-J35 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 MAY 29.0 TT)". Minor Planet Center. 2009-05-08. Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  3. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (2007/09/11 using 73 observations). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 26308". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  4. ^ a b "(26308) 1998 SM165 and S/2001 (26308) 1". johnstonsarchive. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Spencer, J.; Stansberry, J.; Grundy, W.; Noll, K. (September 2006). "A Low Density for Binary Kuiper Belt Object (26308) 1998 SM165". Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (American Astronomical Society) 38: 546. Bibcode:2006DPS....38.3401S. 
  6. ^ "26308 (1998 SM165)". JPL Small-Body Database Browser. 2007-09-11 last obs. Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  7. ^ Stansberry, J.; Grundy, W.; Margot, J-L.; Cruikshank, D.; Emery, J.; Rieke, G.; Trilling, D. (May 2006). "The Albedo, Size, and Density of Binary Kuiper Belt Object (47171) 1999 TC36". The Astrophysical Journal 643. arXiv:astro-ph/0602316. Bibcode:2006ApJ...643..556S. doi:10.1086/502674. 
  8. ^ Jacobson, R. A.; Antreasian, P. G.; Bordi, J. J.; Criddle, K. E.; Ionasescu, R.; Jones, J. B.; Mackenzie, R. A.; Meek, M. C.; Parcher, D.; Pelletier, F. J.; Owen, W. M., Jr.; Roth, D. C.; Roundhill, I. M.; Stauch, J. R. (December 2006). "The Gravity Field of the Saturnian System from Satellite Observations and Spacecraft Tracking Data". The Astronomical Journal 132: 2520–2526. Bibcode:2006AJ....132.2520J. doi:10.1086/508812. 

External links[edit]