(26375) 1999 DE9

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(26375) 1999 DE9
Discovery
Discovered by Chadwick A. Trujillo and
Jane X. Luu
Discovery date February 20, 1999
Designations
MPC designation (26375) 1999 DE9
Minor planet category TNO
5:2 resonance[1]
Orbital characteristics
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 78.987 AU (11.816233 Tm)
Perihelion 32.324 AU (4.835563 Tm)
Semi-major axis 55.655 AU (8.325898 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.419
Orbital period 415.21 a (151,655.072 d)
Average orbital speed 3.81 km/s
Mean anomaly 17.891°
Inclination 7.620°
Longitude of ascending node 322.993°
Argument of perihelion 159.961°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 461 ± 45 km[2]
Albedo 0.06–0.08[2]
Temperature ≈37 K
Absolute magnitude (H) 4.7

(26375) 1999 DE9 (also written (26375) 1999 DE9) is a trans-Neptunian object. Light-curve-amplitude analysis shows only small deviations, suggesting 1999 DE9 is a spheroid with small albedo spots.[3] Measurements by the Spitzer Space Telescope estimate that it is 461 ± 45 km in diameter.[2] It was discovered in 1999 by Chad Trujillo and Jane X. Luu.

It is classified as a resonant as its 417-year orbit is in 2:5 resonance with Neptune's orbit.[1] Spectral analysis has shown traces of ice.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (2008-03-14). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 26375". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2008-09-24. 
  2. ^ a b c Stansberry, Grundy, Brown, Spencer, Trilling, Cruikshank, Luc Margot Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope (2007) arXiv:astro-ph/0702538
  3. ^ Tancredi, G., & Favre, S. (2008) Which are the dwarfs in the Solar System?. Depto. Astronomía, Fac. Ciencias, Montevideo, Uruguay; Observatorio Astronómico Los Molinos, MEC, Uruguay. Retrieved August 10, 2011
  4. ^ Fig 3 for 1999 DE9

External links[edit]