(7888) 1993 UC

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(7888) 1993 UC
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Robert H. McNaught
Discovery date October 28, 1989
Designations
none
Minor planet category Apollo NEO[1]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 2013-Apr-18
(Uncertainty=0)[1]
Aphelion 4.0531 AU
Perihelion 0.81793 AU
2.4355 AU AU
Eccentricity 0.66416
3.80 yr
(1,388 d)
15.158° (M)
Inclination 26.071°
165.95°
323.00°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ~2.7 km (1.7 mi)[2]
~1.3 m/s (3 mph)
2.340 h[1]
Spectral type
U
14.1 (2013 peak)[3]
15.3[1]

(7888) 1993 UC is a near-Earth minor planet in the Apollo group.[1] It was discovered by Robert H. McNaught at the Siding Spring Observatory in Coonabarabran, New South Wales, Australia, on October 20, 1993.[1] The asteroid has an observation arc of 23 years and has a well determined orbit.[1] Its estimated size is 2.3 to 5.2 km.[4]

On March 20, 2013, the asteroid passed 49 lunar distances or 0.12598 AU (18,846,000 km; 11,711,000 mi) from Earth at a relative velocity of 21.8 km/s (49,000 mph).[1] The approach posed no threat to Earth. (7888) 1993 UC is not classified as a potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA) because its Earth MOID (Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance) is only 0.089 AU,[1] and only objects with an Earth MOID less than 0.05 AU are considered PHAs.[5]

It was discovered to be a binary asteroid by Arecibo Observatory in March 2013.[6]

On April 29, 2146, the asteroid will pass 0.0346 AU (5,180,000 km; 3,220,000 mi) from asteroid 4 Vesta.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "JPL Close-Approach Data: 7888 (1993 UC)". 2012-11-25 last obs (arc=23 years). Retrieved 2013-03-19. 
  2. ^ (E.A.R.N.) physical data for (7888) 1993UC
  3. ^ "1993 UC Ephemerides for 20 March 2013". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 2013-03-19. 
  4. ^ NASA "NEO Earth Close Approach Tables", Retrieved on 21 December 2012.
  5. ^ NASA/JPL "NEO Program FAQ", Retrieved on 21 December 2012.
  6. ^ Dr. Lance A. M. Benner (2013-11-18). "Binary and Ternary near-Earth Asteroids detected by radar". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2014-03-01.