(82075) 2000 YW134

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(82075) 2000 YW134
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Kitt Peak
Discovery date 2000-12-26
Designations
MPC designation (82075) 2000 YW134
3:8 resonance?[2]
Detached?
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 November 2013 (2456600.5)
Aphelion 75.485 AU (Q)
Perihelion 41.157 AU (q)
58.321 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.2943
445.4 yr
27.94° (M)
Inclination 19.7720°
126.9423°
316.71°
Known satellites S/2005 (82075) 1[3]
(≈237 km in diameter)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ≈455 km[4]
<500 km[5]
Albedo >0.08[5]
Spectral type
B−V=0.92;
V−R=0.55[6]
≈21.5[7]
4.74[6]

(82075) 2000 YW134, provisionally known as 2000 YW134, is a binary trans-Neptunian object (TNO). It is likely in 3:8 resonance with Neptune or possibly a detached object.

Physical characteristics[edit]

Assuming a generic TNO albedo of 0.09, the primary is about 431 kilometres (268 mi) in diameter with its secondary at 237 kilometres (147 mi) in diameter.[3][4] In 2010, 2000 YW134 was observed by the Herschel Space Telescope in the far-infrared. No thermal radiation has been detected, which allowed astronomers to place an upper limit on its size; the single-object diameter should be less than 500 kilometres (310 mi).[5]

In the visible part of the spectrum, the surface of 2000 YW134 is moderately red.[6]

Classifications[edit]

Dwarf planet?

With a generically estimated diameter of 430 kilometres (270 mi), 2000 YW134 is a possible dwarf planet.[8]

Detached object?

2000 YW134 currently has a perihelion (q) distance of 41 AU.[1] In 2006, Lykawka, using a 4–5 Gyr integration, seemed to show 2000 YW134 as a detached object (with perihelion (q) > 40 AU). The Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES), using a 10My integration (last observation: 2007-11-10), shows it to be in 3:8 resonance with Neptune, with a minimum perihelion (qmin) distance of 38.1 AU.[2] In 2007, Emel’yanenko and Kiseleva showed an 84% probability that it is in the 3:8 resonance.[9]

Satellite[edit]

The moon of 2000 YW134 is relatively large compared to the primary, because the moon is only 1.3 magnitudes fainter than the primary.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 82075 (2000 YW134)" (last observation: 2007-11-10). Retrieved 2009-10-06. 
  2. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 82075" (last observation: 2008-11-10 using 77 of 78 observations over 7.9 years). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2014-10-13. 
  3. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (2006-03-04). "(82075) 2000 YW134". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2009-10-07. 
  4. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (5 July 2013). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  5. ^ a b c Muller, T.G.; Lellouch, E.; Stansberry, J. et al. (2010). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region I. Results from the Herschel science demonstration phase (SDP)". Astronomy and Astrophysics 518: L146. arXiv:1005.2923. Bibcode:2010A&A...518L.146M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201014683. 
  6. ^ a b c Stephen C. Tegler. "Kuiper Belt Object Magnitudes and Surface Color". Retrieved August 1, 2010. 
  7. ^ "AstDyS (82075) 2000YW134 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2009-10-06. 
  8. ^ Mike Brown. "The Dwarf Planets". Retrieved 2009-10-07. 
  9. ^ Emel’yanenko, V. V; Kiseleva, E. L. (2008). "Resonant motion of trans-Neptunian objects in high-eccentricity orbits". Astronomy Letters 34 (4): 271–279. Bibcode:2008AstL...34..271E. doi:10.1134/S1063773708040075. 
  10. ^ Stephens, Denise C.; Noll, Keith S. (2006). "Detection of Six Transneptunian Binaries with NICMOS: A High Fraction of Binaries in the Cold Classical Disk". Astronomical Journal 131 (2): 1142–1148. arXiv:astro-ph/0510130. Bibcode:2006AJ....131.1142S. doi:10.1086/498715. 

External links[edit]