(88710) 2001 SL9

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(88710) 2001 SL9
Orbit of 88710 2001 SL9
Discovery[1][2]
Discovered by NEAT
Discovery site Palomar Observatory
Discovery date September 18, 2001
Designations
None
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch November 4, 2013
Aphelion 1.3479 AU (201.64 Gm)
Perihelion 0.7747 AU (115.89 Gm)
1.0613 AU (158.77 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.27003
1.09 yr
237.91°
Inclination 21.899°
202.87°
329.31°
Known satellites 1
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 1 km (0.62 mi)[3]
Mass 109 mt
Mean density
1.8 g/cm3[2]
0.02565 mm/s2[4]
0.05116 mm/s[4]
2.40035±0.00005 hours[5][1]
Albedo 0.16[2]
Temperature 230-303 K (-43-30°C)[4]
17.6[1]

(88710) 2001 SL9 is a binary Apollo asteroid[1] discovered by NEAT at Palomar Observatory.

Near-Earth Asteroid[edit]

Although 2001 SL9 is classified as a Near-Earth asteroid, it does not pose any threats. It has never, nor will it ever in the next century, come closer than 15,000,000 km (0.1 AU) from Earth or Venus.[1] However, the asteroid would make a good target for a spacecraft flyby, as a flyby to 2010 SL9 would only require a delta-v of 5.4 km/s.[6]

Moon[edit]

2001 SL9 has one moon, S/2001 (88710) 1. It was discovered from lightcurve observations[6] made by P. Pravec et al.[2] This moon is approximately 310 m (1,020 ft) in diameter. Its semi-major axis is 1.8 km (1.1 mi) and its orbital period is 16.4 hours.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "88710 (2001 SL9)". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. SPK-ID: 2088710. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Johnston, Robert (September 1, 2005). "(88710) 2001 SL9". Johnston Archive. Retrieved 26 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "Asteroids Do Have Satellites". Asteroids III. 2002. 
  4. ^ a b c "HEC: Exoplanets Calculator". Planetary Habitability Laboratory. University of Puerto Rico. Retrieved 27 December 2013. 
  5. ^ Green, Daniel (November 3, 2001). "IAUC 7742: 2001fd; 2001fe; 2001 SL_9". International Astronomical Union. Harvard University. Retrieved 27 December 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Benner, Lance (December 14, 2004). "BINARY NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS DETECTED BY RADAR". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 December 2013.