(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me

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"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me"
Single by Lou Johnson
B-side "Wouldn't That Be Something"
Released 1964
Format 7" single
Genre Pop
Writer(s) Burt Bacharach, Hal David
Lou Johnson singles chronology
"Reach Out for Me"
(1963)
"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me"
(1964)
"Kentucky Bluebird (Message To Martha)"
(1964)
"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me"
Single by Sandie Shaw
B-side "Don't You Know"
Released 1964
Format 7" single
Recorded 1964
Genre Pop
Label Pye, Reprise (US)
Writer(s) Burt Bacharach, Hal David
Producer(s) Tony Hatch
Sandie Shaw singles chronology
"As Long As You're Happy Baby"
(1964)
"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me"
(1964)
"I'd Be Far Better Off Without You"
(1964)
"Always Something There to Remind Me"
Single by Naked Eyes
from the album Burning Bridges
B-side The Time Is Now
Released January 1983 (United States)
Format 45
Recorded September 1982
Genre New wave, synthpop
Length 3:18
3:35 (7" & LP)
Label EMI
EMI America Records (North America)
Writer(s) Burt Bacharach, Hal David
Producer(s) Tony Mansfield
Certification Gold (US)
Naked Eyes singles chronology
"Always Something There to Remind Me"
(1983)
"Voices In My Head"
(1983)

"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me" is a song written in the 1960s by songwriting team Burt Bacharach and Hal David.

Lyrics[edit]

The lyrics are sung by a man whose lover has just left him, lamenting that everything he sees reminds him of her and makes him long for their relationship to continue.

First charting versions[edit]

Originally recorded as a demo by Dionne Warwick in 1963, "(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me" first charted for Lou Johnson whose version reached #49 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1964.[1]

British impresario Eve Taylor heard Johnson's version while on a US visit scouting for material for her recent discovery Sandie Shaw, who consequently covered the song for the UK market. Rush-released in September 1964, the song was premiered by Shaw with a performance on Ready Steady Go!, the pop music TV program. Shaw's version reached #1 on the UK charts in three weeks, spending three weeks at #1 in November 1964, and that same month it debuted on the Billboard Hot 100. However, despite reaching the Top Ten in some markets including Detroit and Miami[2] Shaw's version failed to best the US showing of the Lou Johnson original; the Hot 100 peak of Shaw's version was #52.[3]

A #1 hit in Canada and South Africa, Shaw's version of "...Always Something There to Remind Me" was also a hit in Australia (#16), Ireland (#7) and the Netherlands (#10), the track's success in the latter territory not precluding hit status for the Dutch rendering by Edwin Rutten entitled "Ik moet altijd weer opnieuw aan je denken" (#12). Shaw herself recorded "...Always Something There to Remind Me" in French, as "Toujours Un Coin Qui Me Rappelle", with lyrics by Ralph Bernet, which reached #19 in France. A cover by Eddy Mitchell was more successful, reaching #2 in France in April 1965 and also reaching #3 on Belgium's French-language chart. Shaw made a bid for a German hit as well, rendering "...Always Something There to Remind Me" as "Einmal glücklich sein wie die ander'n". It was not a success.

Dionne Warwick recorded "(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me" on 13 April 1967 in the same session which produced her Top 40 hit "The Windows of the World", and it was on the July 1967 album release The Windows of the World that the first-named track was debuted. Warwick's "(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me" had a belated single release in August 1968 as the intended B-side of the Top 40 hit "Who Is Gonna Love Me"; the first-named track received sufficient airplay to reach #65 on the Hot 100.[4]

"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me" – as "Always Something There to Remind Me" – entered the US Top 40 for the first time in 1970 via a version by R. B. Greaves which reached #27 in February 1970. Recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in 1969, with production by Ahmet Ertegun and Jackson Howe, Greaves' version was also a #3 Easy Listening hit.[5]

Naked Eyes version[edit]

Twenty years after its composition, "Always Something There to Remind Me" (so titled) reached the US Top Twenty for the first time via a synthpop reinvention of the song by Naked Eyes which reached the Top Ten on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1983.

Vocalist Pete Byrne and keyboardist Rob Fisher first cut "Always Something There to Remind Me" as one of a number of demos recorded in Bristol upon forming the duo later known as Naked Eyes in early 1982. Byrne would recall: "I had always loved [the] song ["Always Something There to Remind Me"], so we called a friend who had the record, he read the lyric over the phone and we put it together from memory."

On the strength of the demos cut in Bristol Byrne and Fisher were signed to EMI Records in May 1982 and the track "Always Something There to Remind Me" was cut 1 September 1982 in a session at Abbey Road Studios produced by Tony Mansfield. Byrne would recall: "The record was recorded at Abbey Road, and we were invited to a party downstairs, with Paul McCartney and many other stars...When we returned upstairs to the studio around 1 a.m., I decided to have a go at the vocal, It was the first time I have ever recorded a vocal in one take".[6]

Released in the US in January 1983, Naked Eyes' "Always Something There to Remind Me" gradually gained attention entering the Billboard Hot 100 in March 1983 to peak at #8 that June.[7] The cachet of entering the US Top Ten allowed the single, previously overlooked in its performer's United Kingdom homeland, to make a July 1983 UK chart debut but only to rise no higher than #59. "Always Something There to Remind Me" did afford Naked Eyes' Top 10 success in other countries besides the United States: Australia (#7), Canada (#9) and New Zealand (#2).[6]

In Brazil, the song was included on the international soundtrack of the soap opera "Guerra dos Sexos/War Of the Sexes" in 1983.

Naked Eyes re-recorded the song as an acoustic version for the 2007 album Fumbling with the Covers.

Other versions[edit]


Other artists who have recorded this song include: Viola Wills Braid, Lou Christie, José Feliciano, Wayne Fontana, The Four Seasons, the Hippos, Jay and the Americans, La Lupe, Brenda Lee, Peggy Lee, Martha and the Vandellas, Johnny Mathis and Ted Neeley.

Michael McDonald made his recording debut singing lead vocal on a 1968 single version by the Del-Rays.[8]

Sandie Shaw re-recorded the song in 1985 for the soundtrack of the movie, Letter to Brezhnev.[9]

In 1965, Percy Faith and his orchestra released an album titled "Percy Faith Plays Latin Themes for Young Lovers" that included an "easy listening" instrumental version of this song.

Charts (Sandie Shaw version)[edit]

Chart (1964/1965) Peak
position
UK[10] 1
The Netherlands[11] 10
Ireland 7
South Africa 1
Canada 1
Australia 16
USA 52
Preceded by
"Oh, Pretty Woman" by Roy Orbison
UK number-one single
(Sandie Shaw version)

22 October 1964 (3 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Oh, Pretty Woman" by Roy Orbison
Preceded by
"Mr. Lonely" by Bobby Vinton
Canadian RPM number-one single
(Sandie Shaw version)

21 December 1964 (1 week)
Succeeded by
"I Feel Fine" by The Beatles

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lou Johnson's charting singles Retrieved December 7, 2011.
  2. ^ Tim Warden. "ARSA | Sandie Shaw — (There's) Always Something There To Remind Me". Las-solanas.com. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-17. 
  3. ^ Sandie Shaw's charting singles Retrieved December 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Dionne Warwick's charting singles Retrieved December 7, 2011.
  5. ^ R. B. Greaves' charting singles Retrieved December 7, 2011.
  6. ^ a b "Naked Eyes interview". Discog.info. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-17. 
  7. ^ Naked Eyes' charting singles Retrieved December 7, 2011.
  8. ^ "The Del-Rays". Staxrecords.free.fr. Archived from the original on 12 June 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-17. 
  9. ^ Letter to Brezhnev, Original Soundtrack Retrieved December 7, 2011.
  10. ^ Nielsen Business Media, Inc. (November 14, 1964). Billboard. Billboard Magazine. p. 34. ISSN [1]. Retrieved November 9, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Single Top 100 page for Always Something There To Remind Me". Retrieved 2013-09-11. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Serene Dominic. Burt Bacharach, song by song: the ultimate Burt Bacharach reference for fans. Schirmer Trade (New York NY) 2003. ISBN 0-8256-7280-5

External links[edit]