-ism

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-ism is a suffix in many English words, originally derived from Ancient Greek -ισμός (-ismos); reaching the English language through Latin, by medium of the French.[1]

Ism is a derived word used in philosophy, politics, religion or other areas pertaining to an ideology of some sort, sometimes with a derogatory sense.[2] For examples, see:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "-ism". Oxford English Dictionary online. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2014. (subscription required)
  2. ^ "ism n.". Oxford English Dictionary online. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2014. (subscription required)

Further reading[edit]

  • Todays Isms: Socialism, Capitalism, Fascism, Communism, Libertarianism by Alan Ebenstein, William Ebenstein and Edwin Fogelman (11th ed, Pearson, 1999, ISBN 978-0130257147)
  • Isms and Ologies: 453 Difficult Doctrines You've Always Pretended to Understand by Arthur Goldwag (Quercus, 2007, ISBN 978-1847241764) ranges from Abolitionism to Zoroastrianism.
  • Isms: Understanding Art by Stephen Little (A & C Black, 2004, ISBN 978-0713670110), one of a series of similar titles including ... Architecture, ... Modern Art, ... Fashion and ... Religions.
  • The Ism Book: A Field Guide to Philosophy by Peter Saint-Andre.