.ee

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This article is about the top-level Internet domain primarily used in Estonia. For other uses, see EE.
.ee
Introduced 1992
TLD type Country code top-level domain
Status Active
Registry Estonian Internet Foundation
Intended use Entities connected with  Estonia
Actual use Extremely popular in Estonia, now available globally
Structure Registrations are taken directly at the second level, or at the third level beneath various second-level labels
Dispute policies Domain Disputes Committee
Website Estonian Internet Foundation

.ee is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) of Estonia, operated by the Estonian Internet Foundation.

Third-level domain names[edit]

  • .com.ee – companies (incorporated entities) as defined in the Commercial Code.
  • .pri.ee – individuals.
  • .fie.ee – self-employed people (sole proprietors) as defined in the Commercial Code.
  • .med.ee – medical/health care institutions.

History[edit]

The top-level domain .ee was introduced in 1992 and was operated by EENet until July 2010. The administrator of .ee domain was the academic Endel Lippmaa. There was a limit of one domain name per legal entity, and registrations of additional names to protect trademarks were specifically denied because "The domain name has no trademark status". As domains under .ee were meant to be an institution's identification on the Internet (like the register code in the commercial register), registration of additional domains in the defense of a trademark or a name form is not possible.[1] Valid registrations were free of charge.

Domain relaunch[edit]

The new order of registration of .ee TLD became available on 5 July 2010. Estonian Internet Foundation took over .ee ccTLD registry functions from EENet. All existing domains registered before the transition had to be re-registered during a 6 month transition period which ended on 5 January 2011. New .ee domain rules allow unlimited number of domains to be registered by a single entity. Private persons can now register domains directly under .ee. Foreign entities can now register .ee domains although all domains must have an administrative contact with residence in Estonia. Domain disputes will be handled by Domain Disputes Committee. Registration services can be done through accredited registrars listed on Estonian Internet Foundation website.[2] Domains can be registered and renewed on a yearly basis. Registration fee for registrars is set to 12 Euros plus tax.[3]

Criticism[edit]

The new order of domain registering was met with great controversy. The relaunch of the registry was at one point delayed to be reassessed.[4] When the relaunch was finalized, the annual fee for a .ee domain was announced to be 285 Estonian kroons (~24 USD) plus tax, which was met with wide criticism.[5] A list of shortcomings was presented in a public notice to Estonian Internet Foundation by Tõnu Samuel and Jaan Jänesmäe, mentioning that the .ee domain had become the most expensive TLD in Europe.[5] Their cause gained over 800 supporters on Facebook.[6]

The NGO Estonian Internet Community was founded partly as a reaction to the controversial domain reform with 22 founding members.[6] Its board is made up of Tõnu Samuel, Elver Loho and Heiti Kender. Recently it noted on its blog that several of its members had lost faith in the possibility of any sort of compromise and had independently written e-mails to IANA asking them to step in to resolve the controversy.[7]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ EENet registration page (in FAQ)
  2. ^ "Accredited registrars". Eesti Interneti Sihtasutus. Archived from the original on 3 July 2010. Retrieved 23 August 2010. 
  3. ^ "Eesti Interneti Sihtasutus" (in Estonian). Eesti Interneti Sihtasutus. Archived from the original on 12 February 2010. Retrieved 14 February 2010. 
  4. ^ "Läheb käima, ei lähe käima" (in Estonian). ZONE.ee. Archived from the original on 17 April 2010. Retrieved 13 April 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "Infoturbe spetsialist: domeenireform on läbikukkunud" (in Estonian). Eesti Päevaleht. Archived from the original on 14 July 2010. Retrieved 13 July 2010. 
  6. ^ a b "List of EIC's goals". Estonian Internet Community. Archived from the original on 30 October 2010. Retrieved 11 December 2010. 
  7. ^ "Kui kodus ei saa asju aetud..." (in Estonian). Estonian Internet Community. Retrieved 11 December 2010. 

External links[edit]