0s BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 2nd century BC1st century BC1st century
Decades: 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC0s BC0s 10s 20s
Years: BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC
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0s BC is usually considered the last decade of the 1st century BC and the 1st millennium BC. However, like the 0s, the number of years in the 0s BC is not always clearly defined. Note that there is no year zero (0) in either the proleptic Gregorian calendar or Julian calendar. Hence 1 BC is followed by the year AD 1.

AD 1 is the first year of the Anno Domini era (also known as the Common Era). In 525 (the consulship of Probus Junior Flavius Probus), a Christian monk named Dionysius Exiguus stated that the incarnation of Jesus occurred 525 years earlier.[1] Whether Dionysius regarded "incarnation" as Jesus' birth or conception, and whether Dionysius placed it in 1 BC or AD 1 are debated by modern scholars. Nevertheless, these same scholars believe Jesus was actually born a few years earlier, during this decade.

This article concerns the period 9 BC – 1 BC, the last nine years before the Anno Domini era, not the last ten years.

0s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 9 BC 8 BC 7 BC 6 BC 5 BC 4 BC 3 BC 2 BC 1 BC

9 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

8 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

7 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

6 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

5 BC[edit]

4 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Judea Province, Roman Empire[edit]

3 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

2 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

Parthia[edit]

1 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

  • Birth of Jesus (conception on 25 March and birth on 25 December), as assigned by Dionysius Exiguus in his anno Domini era according to most scholars (Dionysius used the word "incarnation", but it is not known whether he meant conception or birth).[3][4] However, at least one scholar thinks Dionysius placed the incarnation of Jesus in the next year, AD 1.[3][4] Most modern scholars do not consider Dionysius' calculations authoritative, placing the event several years earlier (see Chronology of Jesus).[5]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Albrecht Altdorfer's painting the Adoration of the Magi (made ca. 1530) is one of several works of art concerning the Navity of Jesus. Though Jesus's exact birthdate is unknown (other than it would have occurred sometime during this decade)[6]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nineteen Year Cycle of Dionysius First Argumentum.
  2. ^ Eck, Werner; translated by Deborah Lucas Schneider; new material by Sarolta A. Takács. (2003) The Age of Augustus. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing (hardcover, ISBN 0-631-22957-4; paperback, ISBN 0-631-22958-2).
  3. ^ a b Georges Declercq, Anno Domini: The origins of the Christian Era (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2000), pp.143–147.
  4. ^ a b G. Declercq, "Dionysius Exiguus and the introduction of the Christian Era", Sacris Erudiri 41 (2002) 165–246, pp.242–246. Annotated version of a portion of Anno Domini.
  5. ^ James D. G. Dunn, Jesus Remembered, Eerdmans Publishing (2003), page 324.
  6. ^ "Adherents.com – Number of Christians in the world". Archived from the original on 2009-09-12. Retrieved 2009-09-10.