1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane

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1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane
1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane.svg
1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane 3D.png
Names
IUPAC name
1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane
Other names
CFC-113a
Freon 113a
Arcton 63
Freon-FT
1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane
1,1,1-Trichlorotrifluoroethane
1,1,1-Trifluoro-2,2,2-trichloroethane
1,1,1-Trifluorotrichloroethane
CF3CCl3
FC 113
FC133a
Precision cleaning agent
TF
T-WD602
Trichlorotrifluoroethane
FC 113a
2,2,2-Trichloro-1,1,1-trifluoro-ethane
Identifiers
354-58-5 YesY
EC number 206-564-6
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
C2Cl3F3
Molar mass 187.376 g/mol
Density 1.579 g/mL[1][2]
Melting point 13–14 °C (55–57 °F; 286–287 K)
Boiling point 46 °C (115 °F; 319 K)
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Trichlorotrifluoroethane, also called 1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane or CFC-113a is a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). It has the formula Cl3C-CF3.

Environmental effects[edit]

Ozone depletion[edit]

It is one of four man-made chemicals newly discovered in the atmosphere by a team at the University of East Anglia. But CFC-113a is the only known CFC whose abundance in the atmosphere is still growing. CFC-113a seems to have been accumulating unabated since 1960. Its source remains a mystery, but illegal manufacturing is suspected by some. Between 2010 and 2012, emissions of the gas jumped by 45 percent.[3][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1,1,1-Trichlorotrifluoroethane". chemblink.com. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  2. ^ "Material Safety Data Sheet : 1,1,1-Trichlorotrifluoroethane". fishersci.com. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  3. ^ Laube, Johannes C.; Newland, Mike J.; Hogan, Christopher; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Fraser, Paul J.; Martinerie, Patricia; Oram, David E.; Reeves, Claire E.; Röckmann, Thomas; Schwander, Jakob; Witrant, Emmanuel; Sturges, William T. (9 March 2014). "Newly detected ozone-depleting substances in the atmosphere". Nature Geoscience. doi:10.1038/ngeo2109. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  4. ^ McGrath, Matt. "Mysterious new man-made gases pose threat to ozone layer". BBC. Retrieved 10 March 2014.