101 Zen Stories

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101 Zen Stories is a 1919 compilation of Zen koans[1] including 19th and early 20th century anecdotes compiled by Nyogen Senzaki,[2] and a translation of Shasekishū,[1][3] written in the 13th century by Japanese Zen master Mujū (無住) (literally, "non-dweller").[3] The book was reprinted by Paul Reps as part of Zen Flesh, Zen Bones.[4][3] Well-known koans in the collection include A Cup of Tea (1), The Sound of One Hand (21), No Water, No Moon (29), and Everything is Best (31).

A Cup of Tea[edit]

Nan-in, a Japanese master during the Meiji era (1868-1912), received a university professor who came to inquire about Zen.
Nan-in served tea. He poured his visitor's cup full, and then kept on pouring.
The professor watched the overflow until he no longer could restrain himself. "It is overfull. No more will go in!"
"Like this cup," Nan-in said, "you are full of your own opinions and speculations. How can I show you Zen unless you first empty your cup?"

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Koan Studies". thezensite. Retrieved April 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ Ross, Nancy Wilson. The World of Zen: An East-West Anthology. Vintage. p. xxii. ISBN 9780394703015. 
  3. ^ a b c Reps, Paul; Senzaki, Nyogen. Zen Flesh, Zen Bones: A Collection of Zen and Pre-zen Writings. Tuttle Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 9780804831864. 
  4. ^ Ross, Nancy Wilson. The World of Zen: An East-West Anthology. Vintage. p. 74. ISBN 9780394703015. 

External links[edit]