107 Piscium

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107 Piscium
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0 (ICRS)
Constellation Pisces
Right ascension 01h 42m 29.7619s[1]
Declination +20° 16′ 06.616″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 5.14 to 5.26[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type K1V[1]
U−B color index +0.49[3]
B−V color index +0.84[3]
V−R color index 0.5[1]
R−I color index +0.43[3]
Variable type Suspected[2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) −33.5 ± 0.9[1] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: −302.14[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −677.46[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 133.92 ± 0.91[1] mas
Distance 24.4 ± 0.2 ly
(7.47 ± 0.05 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 5.87[4]
Details
Mass 0.83 (0.80 to 0.89)[5] M
Radius 0.80 ± 0.06[6] R
Luminosity (bolometric) 0.46[4] L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.50[4] cgs
Temperature 5242 ± 3.2[7] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] −0.04[5] dex
Rotation 35.0 days[8]
Rotational velocity (v sin i) 1[5] km/s
Age 6.3[9] Gyr
Other designations
107 Psc, BD+19°279, CCDM J01425+2016A, GC 2080, GCTP 356, Gliese 68, Gliese 68.0, HD 10476, HIP 7981, HR 493, IDS 01371+1947 A, LFT 153, LHS 1287, LTT 10596, NLTT 5685, PPM 91014, SAO 74883, WDS 01425+2016A.[1][10]
Database references
SIMBAD data

107 Piscium (107 Psc) is a K-type main sequence star in the constellation of Pisces, about 24.4 light years away from the Earth.[1] It has an apparent visual magnitude which varies between 5.14 and 5.26.[2]

Naming[edit]

John Flamsteed numbered the stars of Pisces from 1 to 113, publishing his Catalogus Britannicus in 1725. He accidentally numbered 107 Piscium twice, as he also allocated it the designation of 2 Arietis.[11]

Properties[edit]

The star is somewhat older than the Sun—approximately 6 billion years old.[9] It has 83%[5] of the mass and 80%[6] of the radius of the Sun, but shines with only 46% of the Sun's luminosity.[4] The effective temperature of the star is 5,242 K.[7] It is rotating slowly with a period of 35.0 days.[8] The abundance of elements other than hydrogen and helium—the star's metallicity—is slightly lower than that of the Sun.[5]

107 Piscium has been examined for the presence of an infrared excess caused by exozodiacal dust, but none was detected.[12] The habitable zone for this star, defined as the locations where liquid water could be present on an Earth-like planet, is at a radius of 0.52–1.10 Astronomical Units (AU), where 1 AU is the average distance from the Earth to the Sun.[12]

In 1997, based on data collected during the Hipparcos mission, the star was categorized as an astrometric binary with a period of 0.576 years. However, this result has not been not confirmed.[13]

Distance[edit]

107 Piscium distance estimates

Source Parallax, mas Distance, pc Distance, ly Distance, Pm Ref.
Woolley et al. (1970) 134±6 7.5±0.3 24.3+1.1
−1
230.3+10.8
−9.9
[14]
Gliese & Jahreiß (1991) 126.5±5.8 7.9+0.4
−0.3
25.8+1.2
−1.1
243.9+11.7
−10.7
[15]
van Altena et al. (1995) 132.6±2.3 7.54±0.13 24.6±0.4 232.7+4.1
−4
[16]
Perryman et al. (1997) (Hipparcos) 133.91±0.91 7.47±0.05 24.36+0.17
−0.16
230.4±1.6 [17]
Perryman et al. (1997) (Tycho) (absents) [18]
van Leeuwen (2007) 132.76±0.50 7.532±0.028 24.57±0.09 232.4±0.9 [19]

Non-trigonometric distance estimates are marked in italic. The most precise estimate is marked in bold.

Visual companions[edit]

The star has two visual companions, WDS 01425+2016B and WDS 01425+2016C; C is optical.[20]

Multiple/double star designation: WDS 01425+2016[10]
Component Primary Right
ascension
(α)
Equinox J2000.0
Declination (δ)
Equinox J2000.0
Epoch of
observed
separation
Angular
distance
from
primary
Position
angle
(relative
to primary)
Apparent
magnitude
(V)
Database
reference
B A 01h 42m 29.5s +20° 16′ 33″[21] 1910 19.0 248° 11.7 Simbad
C A 01h 42m 29.8s +20° 18′ 23″[22] 1924 104.4 353° 12.1 Simbad


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j NSV 600 -- Variable Star, database entry, SIMBAD. Accessed on line September 24, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c NSV 600, database entry, New Catalogue of Suspected Variable Stars, the improved version, Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow, Russia. Accessed on line September 24, 2008.
  3. ^ a b c HR 493, database entry, The Bright Star Catalogue, 5th Revised Ed. (Preliminary Version), D. Hoffleit and W. H. Warren, Jr., CDS ID V/50. Accessed on line September 24, 2008.
  4. ^ a b c d HD 10476, catalog entry, Fundamental parameters and elemental abundances of 160 F-G-K stars based on OAO spectrum database, Y. Takeda, CDS ID J/PASJ/59/335; see also Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 59, #2 (April 2007), pp. 335–356, Bibcode2007PASJ...59..335T.
  5. ^ a b c d e HD 10476, database entry, The Geneva-Copenhagen Survey of Solar neighbourhood, J. Holmberg et al., 2007, CDS ID V/117A. Accessed on line November 19, 2008.
  6. ^ a b Perrin, M.-N. (1987), "Stellar radius determination from IRAS 12-micron fluxes", Astronomy and Astrophysics 172: 235–240, Bibcode:1987A&A...172..235P. 
  7. ^ a b Kovtyukh; Soubiran, C.; Belik, S. I.; Gorlova, N. I. (2003), "High precision effective temperatures for 181 F-K dwarfs from line-depth ratios", Astronomy and Astrophysics 411 (3): 559–564, arXiv:astro-ph/0308429, Bibcode:2003A&A...411..559K, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20031378. 
  8. ^ a b Maldonado, J. et al. (October 2010), "A spectroscopy study of nearby late-type stars, possible members of stellar kinematic groups", Astronomy and Astrophysics 521: A12, arXiv:1007.1132, Bibcode:2010A&A...521A..12M, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201014948. 
  9. ^ a b Mamajek, Eric E.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. (November 2008), "Improved Age Estimation for Solar-Type Dwarfs Using Activity-Rotation Diagnostics", The Astrophysical Journal 687 (2): 1264–1293, arXiv:0807.1686, Bibcode:2008ApJ...687.1264M, doi:10.1086/591785. 
  10. ^ a b Entry 01425+2016, The Washington Double Star Catalog, United States Naval Observatory. Accessed on line September 24, 2008.
  11. ^ Wagman, M. (August 1987), "Flamsteed's Missing Stars", Journal for the History of Astronomy, Vol.18, NO. 3/AUG, P.209, 1987 18: 213, Bibcode:1987JHA....18..209W 
  12. ^ a b Cantrell, Justin R. et al. (October 2013), "The Solar Neighborhood XXIX: The Habitable Real Estate of Our Nearest Stellar Neighbors", The Astronomical Journal 146 (4): 99, arXiv:1307.7038, Bibcode:2013AJ....146...99C, doi:10.1088/0004-6256/146/4/99. 
  13. ^ Agati, J.-L. et al. (February 2015), "Are the orbital poles of binary stars in the solar neighbourhood anisotropically distributed?", Astronomy and Astrophysics 574: A6, arXiv:1411.4919, Bibcode:2015A&A...574A...6A, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201323056 
  14. ^ Woolley R.; Epps E. A.; Penston M. J.; Pocock S. B. (1970). "Woolley 68". Catalogue of stars within 25 parsecs of the Sun. 
  15. ^ Gliese, W. and Jahreiß, H. (1991). "Gl 68". Preliminary Version of the Third Catalogue of Nearby Stars. 
  16. ^ Van Altena W. F., Lee J. T., Hoffleit E. D. (1995). "GCTP 356". The General Catalogue of Trigonometric Stellar Parallaxes (Fourth ed.). 
  17. ^ Perryman et al. (1997). "HIP 7981". The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. 
  18. ^ Perryman et al. (1997). "HIP 7981". The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. 
  19. ^ van Leeuwen F. (2007). "HIP 7981". Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction. 
  20. ^ Entry 01425+2016, The Washington Double Star Catalog, notes, United States Naval Observatory. Accessed on line September 24, 2008.
  21. ^ BD+19 279B -- Star in double system, database entry, SIMBAD. Accessed on line September 24, 2008.
  22. ^ BD+19 279C -- Star in double system, database entry, SIMBAD. Accessed on line September 24, 2008.

External links[edit]