111 Ate

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111 Ate
Discovery
Discovered by Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters
Discovery date August 14, 1870
Designations
Alternative names 1935 AA, A911 KE
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 427.329 Gm (2.857 AU)
Perihelion 349.027 Gm (2.333 AU)
Semi-major axis 388.178 Gm (2.595 AU)
Eccentricity 0.101
Orbital period 1526.712 d (4.18 a)
Average orbital speed 18.44 km/s
Mean anomaly 85.294°
Inclination 4.923°
Longitude of ascending node 305.885°
Argument of perihelion 166.037°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 142.85 ± 5.94[2] km
Mass (1.76 ± 0.44) × 1018[2] kg
Mean density 1.15 ± 0.32[2] g/cm3
Equatorial surface gravity 0.0376 m/s²
Escape velocity 0.0712 km/s
Rotation period 22.072 ± 0.001[3] h
Temperature ~173 K
Spectral type C[4]
Absolute magnitude (H) 8.02

111 Ate is a main-belt asteroid that was discovered by the German-American astronomer C. H. F. Peters on August 14, 1870,[5] and named after Ate, the goddess of mischief and destruction in Greek mythology. In the Tholen classification system, it is categorized as a carbonaceous C-type asteroid, while the Bus asteroid taxonomy system lists it as an Ch asteroid.[4]

Two stellar occultations by Ate were observed in 2000, only two months apart. The occultation of the star HIP 2559 by 111 Ate was used to determine a chord length of 125.6 ± 7.2 km through the asteroid, giving a lower bound on the maximum dimension.[6] During 2000, 111 Ate was observed by radar from the Arecibo Observatory. The return signal matched an effective diameter of 135 ± 15 km.[7] The estimated size of this asteroid is 143[2] km, making it one of the larger asteroids.

Based upon an irregular light curve that was generated from photometric observations of this asteroid at Pulkovo Observatory, it has a rotation period of 22.072 ± 0.001 hours and varies in brightness by 0.12 ± 0.01 in magnitude.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yeomans, Donald K., "111 Ate", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-03-25. 
  2. ^ a b c d Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98-118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (October 2011), "Rotation Period Determinations for 11 Parthenope, 38 Leda, 111 Ate 194 Prokne, 217 Eudora, and 224 Oceana", Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 38 (4): 183-185, Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..183P. 
  4. ^ a b DeMeo, Francesca E. et al. (July 2009), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared", Icarus 202 (1): 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, retrieved 2013-04-08.  See appendix A.
  5. ^ "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances (IAU Minor Planet center), retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  6. ^ Devyatkin, A. V. et al. (November 2008), "Photometric observations of solar system bodies with ZA-320M automatic mirror astrograph in Pulkovo observatory", Planetary and Space Science 56 (14): 1888-1892, Bibcode:2008P&SS...56.1888D, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2008.02.014.  See Table 1.
  7. ^ Magri, Christopher et al. (January 2007), "A radar survey of main-belt asteroids: Arecibo observations of 55 objects during 1999–2003", Icarus 186 (1): 126–151, Bibcode:2007Icar..186..126M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.08.018