113th United States Congress

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113th United States Congress
United States Capitol west front edit2.jpg
United States Capitol (2011)

Duration: January 3, 2013 – January 3, 2015

Senate President: Joe Biden (D)
Senate Pres. pro tem: Patrick Leahy (D)
House Speaker: John Boehner (R)
Members: 100 Senators
435 Representatives
6 Non-voting members
Senate Majority: Democratic Party
House Majority: Republican Party

Sessions
1st: January 3, 2013 – December 26, 2013
2nd: January 3, 2014 – present
<112th 114th>

The One Hundred Thirteenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government. It is composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives based on the results of the 2012 Senate elections and the 2012 House elections. The seats in the House were apportioned based on the 2010 United States Census. It first met in Washington, D.C. on January 3, 2013, and is scheduled to end on January 3, 2015. Senators elected to regular terms in 2008 are in the last two years of those terms during this Congress.

At its outset, this Congress had 43 African American members (all but one in the House of Representatives),[1] and a record high number of female (100)[2] and LGBT (8)[3][4] members. Only 19% of its members have active duty military service background, which is down from 80% in 1977.[5] According to a Gallup Poll released in July 2013, the 113th Congress had the highest disapproval rating of any Congress since 1974, when data first started being collected: 78% of Americans surveyed said that they disapproved of the job Congress was doing, while only 15% said that they approved.[6][7] In October 2013, during the government shutdown, this slipped to ten percent approval according to several polls.[citation needed]

Contents

Major events[edit]

A government shutdown notice posted on October 1, 2013, with the Statue of Liberty in the far background[8]

Major legislation[edit]

Enacted[edit]

Proposed[edit]

Appropriations bills[edit]

Fiscal year 2014[edit]

Fiscal year 2014 runs from October 1, 2013 to September 30, 2014.[14]

Fiscal year 2015[edit]

Fiscal year 2015 runs from October 1, 2014 to September 20, 2015.[14]

Party summary[edit]

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

Senate[edit]

Senate party standings (as of October 31, 2013)
  53 Democrats
  2 Independents, both caucusing with Democrats
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total Vacant
Democratic Independent Republican
End of previous Congress 51 2 47 100 0
Begin 53 2 45 100 0
June 3, 2013 52 99 1
June 10, 2013 46 100 0
October 31, 2013 53 45
Latest voting share 55% 45%

House of Representatives[edit]

House party standings (as of June 24, 2014)
  234 Republicans
  199 Democrats
  2 vacancies
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total Vacant
Democratic Republican
End of previous Congress 191 240 431 4
Begin 200 233 433 2
January 22, 2013 232 432 3
April 9, 2013 201 433 2
May 7, 2013 233 434 1
June 4, 2013 234 435 0
July 15, 2013 200 434 1
August 2, 2013 233 433 2
September 26, 2013 232 432 3
October 18, 2013 231 431 4
November 16, 2013 232 432 3
December 10, 2013 201 433 2
December 17, 2013 233 434 1
January 6, 2014 200 433 2
January 27, 2014 232 432 3
February 18, 2014 199 431 4
March 11, 2014 233 432 3
June 24, 2014 234 433 2
Latest voting share 46.0% 53.9%
Non-voting members 6 0 6 0

Leadership[edit]

[ Section contents: Senate: Majority (D), Minority (R)House: Majority (R), Minority (D) ]

Senate[edit]

Senate President
Joe Biden (D)
Senate President pro tempore
Patrick Leahy (D)

Majority (Democratic) leadership[edit]

Minority (Republican) leadership[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

House Speaker
John Boehner (R)

Majority (Republican) leadership[edit]

Minority (Democratic) leadership[edit]

Members[edit]

Senate[edit]

For year of birth, when first took office, when current term expires, prior background, and education, see List of current United States Senators.

Senators are listed by state, and the numbers refer to their Senate classes.

House of Representatives[edit]

For year of birth, when first took office, prior background, religious affiliation and education, see Current members of the United States House of Representatives.
For maps of congressional districts, see List of United States congressional districts.

Changes in membership[edit]

Senate[edit]

State
(class)
Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
Massachusetts
(2)
John Kerry
(D)
Resigned February 1, 2013 to become U.S. Secretary of State.[27][28]
Successor was appointed February 1, 2013 to continue the term.
Mo Cowan
(D)
February 1, 2013
New Jersey
(2)
Frank Lautenberg
(D)
Died June 3, 2013.
Successor was appointed June 6, 2013 to continue the term.
Jeffrey Chiesa (R) June 10, 2013
Massachusetts
(2)
Mo Cowan
(D)
Appointment expired July 16, 2013, following a special election.[29]
Successor was elected June 25, 2013 to finish the term ending with this Congress.
Ed Markey (D) July 16, 2013
New Jersey
(2)
Jeffrey Chiesa
(R)
Appointment expired October 31, 2013, following a special election.[30][31]
Successor was elected October 16, 2013 to finish the term ending with this Congress.
Cory Booker (D) October 31, 2013[31]
Montana
(2)
Max Baucus
(D)
Resigned February 6, 2014 to become Ambassador to China.
Successor was appointed February 9, 2014 to finish the term ending with this Congress.
John Walsh (D) February 11, 2014

House of Representatives[edit]

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date successor
seated
Illinois 2nd Vacant Jesse Jackson, Jr. (D) resigned November 21, 2012, near the end of the previous Congress for health reasons.[32]
A special election was held April 9, 2013.
Robin Kelly (D) April 9, 2013[33]
South Carolina 1st Vacant Tim Scott (R) resigned January 2, 2013, near the end of the previous Congress, when appointed to the Senate.[34]
A special election was held May 7, 2013.
Mark Sanford (R) May 15, 2013[35]
Missouri 8th Jo Ann Emerson
(R)
Resigned January 22, 2013 to become president and CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.[36]
A special election was held June 4, 2013.
Jason Smith (R)[37] June 5, 2013[38]
Massachusetts 5th Ed Markey
(D)
Resigned July 16, 2013, having been elected to the United States Senate in a special election.
A special election was held December 10, 2013.
Katherine Clark (D)[39] December 12, 2013
Alabama 1st Jo Bonner
(R)
Resigned August 2, 2013 to become a vice chancellor in the University of Alabama System.
A special election was held December 17, 2013.
Bradley Byrne
(R)
January 7, 2014
Louisiana 5th Rodney Alexander
(R)
Resigned September 26, 2013 to become the secretary of the Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs.
A special election was held November 16, 2013.[40]
Vance McAllister (R) November 21, 2013[41]
Florida 13th Bill Young
(R)
Died October 18, 2013.
A special election was held March 11, 2014.
David Jolly (R) March 13, 2014[42]
North Carolina 12th Mel Watt
(D)
Resigned January 6, 2014 to become head of the Federal Housing Finance Agency.
A special election will be held November 4, 2014.
TBD TBD
Florida 19th Trey Radel
(R)
Resigned January 27, 2014 following a conviction for cocaine possession.[43]
A special election was held June 24, 2014.
Curt Clawson (R) June 25, 2014
New Jersey 1st Rob Andrews
(D)
Resigned February 18, 2014, to take a position at a Philadelphia law firm.[44]
A special election will be held November 4, 2014.
TBD TBD

Committees[edit]

[Section contents: Senate, House, Joint ] Listed alphabetically by chamber, including Chairperson and Ranking Member.

Senate[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

Sources: H.Res. 6, H.Res. 7

Joint committees[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Burke, Lauren Victoria (November 7, 2012). "Congress: 5 New African Americans Will Join Congress in 2013". politic365. Retrieved November 12, 2012. 
  2. ^ Mendelberg, Tali; Karpowitz, Christopher F (November 8, 2012). "More Women, but Not Nearly Enough". NYTimes.com (The New York Times). Retrieved November 12, 2012. 
  3. ^ Moulton, Brian (November 12, 2012). "Kyrsten Sinema Headed to the U.S. House of Representatives". Human Rights Campaign. Retrieved November 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Yes, I'm gay, Michaud says. Now let's get our state back on track". Portland Press Herald. November 4, 2013. 
  5. ^ Davis, Susan (November 20, 2012). "Number of veterans in Congress continues to decline". USA Today. Associated Press. Retrieved June 23, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Congress and the Public". Gallup.com. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  7. ^ Brown, Alyssa (July 17, 2013). "U.S. Congress Approval Remains Dismal". Gallup.com. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  8. ^ Bailey, Holly (October 1, 2013). "Federal shutdown closes Statue of Liberty and other top tourist sites". Yahoo News. Retrieved October 26, 2013. 
  9. ^ Cohen, Micah. "Fivethirtyeight blog: Were the GOP Votes Against Boehner a Historic Rejection?". NYTimes.com (The New York Times). 
  10. ^ H.J.Res. 122
  11. ^ a b "Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies". Inaugural.senate.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2013. 
  12. ^ "McCain claims Senate leaders have deal to avert showdown over Obama nominees". FoxNews. Retrieved July 16, 2013. 
  13. ^ Peters, September 25, 2013. "After 21 Hours, Cruz Ends Senate Speech". the New York Times. Retrieved September 25, 2013. 
  14. ^ a b Heniff Jr., Bill (26 November 2012). "Basic Federal Budgeting Terminology". Congressional Research Service. Retrieved 9 January 2014. 
  15. ^ "H.R. 4800 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  16. ^ Cox, Ramsey; Marcos, Cristina (11 June 2014). "Wednesday: School is out but Congress considers student loans, lunches". The Hill. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  17. ^ "H.R. 4660 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
  18. ^ Marcos, Cristina (30 May 2014). "House passes third '15 appropriations bill". The Hill. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  19. ^ Marcos, Cristina (16 June 2014). "This week: Spending bills, VA reform, leadership races". The Hill. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  20. ^ Marcos, Cristina (7 July 2014). "This week: Sportsmen's bill, appropriations". The Hill. Retrieved 10 July 2014. 
  21. ^ "H.R. 4487 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 2 May 2014. 
  22. ^ a b Marcos, Cristina (25 April 2014). "Next week:Appropriations season begins". The Hill. Retrieved 1 May 2014. 
  23. ^ "H.R. 4486 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 1 May 2014. 
  24. ^ "H.R. 4745 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 9 June 2014. 
  25. ^ Marcos, Cristina (10 June 2014). "House passes fourth '15 appropriations bill". The Hill. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  26. ^ Newlin, Eliza. "Res. Com. Pedro Pierluisi (D-PR, At-large) - The Almanac of American Politics". Nationaljournal.com. Retrieved November 9, 2012. 
  27. ^ Murphy, Matt (January 28, 2013). "US senate special election to replace John Kerry will be June 25". metrowestdailynews.com (Cambridge Chronicle & Tab). Retrieved January 29, 2013. 
  28. ^ Landler, Mark (December 21, 2012). "Kerry Named for the Role of a Lifetime". NYTimes.com (The New York Times). p. A1. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 
  29. ^ Seelye, Katharine (January 30, 2013). "Governor Names Longtime Friend to Kerry’s Seat". NYTimes.com (The New York Times). Retrieved January 30, 2013. 
  30. ^ Santi, Angela (June 4, 2013). "Chris Christie: Special Election To Be Held In October For Frank Lautenberg's Seat". AP (The Huffington Post). Retrieved June 4, 2013. 
  31. ^ a b Cramer, Ruby (October 23, 2013). "Cory Booker To Be Sworn In To The Senate On Halloween". Buzzfeed. Retrieved October 23, 2013. 
  32. ^ O'Keefe, Ed (November 21, 2012). "Jesse Jackson Jr. resigns: Read his resignation letter". washingtonpost.com (The Washington Post). 
  33. ^ "Kelly, Robin L.". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. 
  34. ^ 2012 Congressional Record, Vol. 158, Page H7467 (December 30, 2012)
  35. ^ Camia, Catalina (May 14, 2013). "Mark Sanford to be sworn in Wednesday". USAToday.com (USA Today). Retrieved June 5, 2013. 
  36. ^ "Missouri rep leaving Congress in February". cnn.com (CNN). December 3, 2012. 
  37. ^ "2013 Missouri House 8th District Special Election". Politico.com (Politico). June 4, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2013. 
  38. ^ "Jason Smith sworn in as newest Missourian in Congress". stltoday.com (St. Louis Post-Dispatch). June 6, 2013. Retrieved June 6, 2013. 
  39. ^ Isenstadt, Alex (December 10, 2013). "Katherine Clark wins Massachusetts special". 
  40. ^ McGaughy, Lauren (August 7, 2013). "Rodney Alexander to join Jindal administration, departure from Congress will trigger special election". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved August 8, 2013. 
  41. ^ Alpert, Bruce (November 21, 2013). "Vance McAllister's first visit to Washington is to take a seat in Congress". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved November 23, 2013. 
  42. ^ http://www.wtsp.com/news/topstories/article/360110/250/Jolly-to-be-sworn-in-Thursday-afternoon
  43. ^ Sherman, Jake (January 27, 2014). "Trey Radel to resign House seat". politico.com. Retrieved January 27, 2014. 
  44. ^ Ostermeier, Eric (February 4, 2014). "Andrews Exits US House with Top 10 Longest Tenure in New Jersey History". Retrieved February 27, 2014. 

External links[edit]