11th Indian Division

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For the World War II formation, see 11th Infantry Division (India).
11th Indian Division
Active 24 December 1914 – 31 May 1915
Country India
Branch British Indian Army
Type Infantry
Size Division
Engagements

World War I

Sinai and Palestine Campaign
Actions on the Suez Canal

The 11th Indian Division was an infantry division of the British Indian Army during World War I. It was formed in December 1914 with two infantry brigades already in Egypt and a third formed in January 1915. After taking part in the Actions on the Suez Canal, the division was dispersed as its brigades were posted away.

The division was commanded throughout its existence by Major-General Alexander Wallace.[1]

History[edit]

The pre-war 22nd (Lucknow) Infantry Brigade and the 32nd Indian Brigade (formed in October 1914)[2] were posted to Egypt to help defend the Suez Canal. The 11th Indian Division was formed on 24 December 1915 with these two brigades, and little else in terms of divisional troops. A third brigade (31st) was formed in January 1915 with other units already in Egypt. The division beat off Turkish attempts to cross the Suez Canal on 3–4 February 1915 in the Actions on the Suez Canal.[3]

Thereafter, the division was dissolved in May 1915 with its brigades posted to the Suez Canal Defences. The brigades did not last much longer:[4] the 22nd and 32nd Brigades bere broken up in January 1916[2] and the 31st Brigade joined 10th Indian Division at the same time, but was also broken up a month later.[2]

Order of Battle, January 1915[edit]

The division commanded the following units in January 1915:[5][6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ 22nd (Lucknow) Brigade was mobilized by 8th (Lucknow) Division and arrived in Egypt in November 1914. It was broken up in January 1916.[2]
  2. ^ 31st Indian Brigade was formed in Egypt in January 1915. It transferred to 10th Indian Division in January 1916.[2]
  3. ^ 32nd (Imperial Service) Brigade was formed in October 1914. It was broken up in January 1916.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Perry 1993, p. 119
  2. ^ a b c d e f Perry 1993, p. 121
  3. ^ Perry 1993, p. 122
  4. ^ "Indian Army Brigades". orbat.com. Retrieved 8 September 2009. 
  5. ^ Rinaldi 2008, pp. 126–127
  6. ^ Perry 1993, p. 120

Bibliography[edit]