12"/50 caliber gun (Argentina)

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12"/50 caliber Bethlehem gun
ARA Moreno 305mm gun.jpg
a main gun of the battleship ARA Moreno during its construction, sometime between 1910 and 1915.
Type Naval gun
Place of origin United States
Service history
In service 1915–1956[1][2]
Used by Rivadavia-class battleships
Wars World War I, World War II
Production history
Designed 1910
Manufacturer Bethlehem Steel Corporation[1]
Specifications
Weight 66 tons[1]
Barrel length 50 ft 6 in (15.39 m) bore (50 cal)[1]

Caliber 12 inches (304.8 mm)[1]
Recoil 38 inches (97 cm)[1]
Rate of fire 2.0–3.0 rounds per minute[1]
Maximum firing range 24,000 yd (22,000 m)[1]

The 12"/50 caliber Bethlehem gun was a US naval gun designed in 1910 as the main armament for the Argentine Navy’s dreadnought battleships of the Rivadavia class.

Design[edit]

The gun was designed in 1910, and it was probably based on the US 12"/50 (30.5 cm) Mark 7 naval gun with a breech weight added. The guns were manufactured at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation.[1] The ships in the class had twelve 305 mm guns each, mounted in six twin (2-gun) turrets, with two turrets forward, two aft, and one on each side.

Measurements and Capabilities[edit]

Main deck and guns of Moreno

The gun weighed 66 tons including the breech and was capable of an average rate of fire of 2–3 rounds a minute. It could throw an 870 lb. (394.6 kg) Mark 15 armor piercing shell 24,000 yards (21,950 meters) at an elevation of 14.7°, while the "barrel life" of the guns was 200 shots.

The previous 12" gun, manufactured for the U.S. Navy, was the Mark 7 version, which had been designed and installed in the 1912 era Wyoming-class battleships.[1]

Service[edit]

This gun was only installed in the Argentine Navy Rivadavia-class battleships Rivadavia and Moreno.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j DiGiulian, Tony. "Argentina - 12"/50 (30.5 cm) Bethlehem". Navweaps.com. Archived from the original on 14 January 2010. Retrieved 22 February 2010. 
  2. ^ 1956 is the year the Argentinian battleships were decommissioned.

External links[edit]