1224

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 12th century13th century14th century
Decades: 1190s  1200s  1210s  – 1220s –  1230s  1240s  1250s
Years: 1221 1222 122312241225 1226 1227
1224 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishments and disestablishments categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
Art and literature
1224 in poetry
1224 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1224
MCCXXIV
Ab urbe condita 1977
Armenian calendar 673
ԹՎ ՈՀԳ
Assyrian calendar 5974
Bahá'í calendar −620 – −619
Bengali calendar 631
Berber calendar 2174
English Regnal year Hen. 3 – 9 Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar 1768
Burmese calendar 586
Byzantine calendar 6732–6733
Chinese calendar 癸未(Water Goat)
3920 or 3860
    — to —
甲申年 (Wood Monkey)
3921 or 3861
Coptic calendar 940–941
Discordian calendar 2390
Ethiopian calendar 1216–1217
Hebrew calendar 4984–4985
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1280–1281
 - Shaka Samvat 1146–1147
 - Kali Yuga 4325–4326
Holocene calendar 11224
Igbo calendar 224–225
Iranian calendar 602–603
Islamic calendar 620–621
Japanese calendar Jōō 3 / Gennin 1
(元仁元年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 1224
MCCXXIV
Korean calendar 3557
Minguo calendar 688 before ROC
民前688年
Thai solar calendar 1767


Year 1224 (MCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Americas[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Education[edit]

  • The University of Naples is founded.

Religion[edit]

  • September 14St. Francis of Assisi, while praying on the mountain of Verna, during a 40-day fast, is said to have had a vision, as a result of which he received the stigmata (approximate date). Brother Leo, who had been with Francis at the time, left a clear and simple account of the event, the first definite account of the phenomenon of stigmata.[2]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peter Linehan (1999). "Chapter 21: Castile, Portugal and Navarre". In David Abulafia. The New Cambridge Medieval History c.1198-c.1300. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 668–699 [672]. ISBN 0-521-36289-X. 
  2. ^ Robinson, Paschal (09/01/1909). "St. Francis of Assisi". The Catholic Encyclopedia VI. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved 2008-01-21.