1276

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the year 1276.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 12th century13th century14th century
Decades: 1240s  1250s  1260s  – 1270s –  1280s  1290s  1300s
Years: 1273 1274 127512761277 1278 1279
1276 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishments and disestablishments categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
Art and literature
1276 in poetry
1276 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1276
MCCLXXVI
Ab urbe condita 2029
Armenian calendar 725
ԹՎ ՉԻԵ
Assyrian calendar 6026
Bahá'í calendar −568 – −567
Bengali calendar 683
Berber calendar 2226
English Regnal year Edw. 1 – 5 Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar 1820
Burmese calendar 638
Byzantine calendar 6784–6785
Chinese calendar 乙亥(Wood Pig)
3972 or 3912
    — to —
丙子年 (Fire Rat)
3973 or 3913
Coptic calendar 992–993
Discordian calendar 2442
Ethiopian calendar 1268–1269
Hebrew calendar 5036–5037
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1332–1333
 - Shaka Samvat 1198–1199
 - Kali Yuga 4377–4378
Holocene calendar 11276
Igbo calendar 276–277
Iranian calendar 654–655
Islamic calendar 674–675
Japanese calendar Kenji 2
(建治2年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 1276
MCCLXXVI
Korean calendar 3609
Minguo calendar 636 before ROC
民前636年
Thai solar calendar 1819


Year 1276 (MCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

It is the only Year of Four Popes.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Africa[edit]

Americas[edit]

  • A severe 23-year drought begins to affect the Grand Canyon area, eventually forcing the agriculture-dependent Anasazi culture to migrate out of the region.

Asia[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Culture[edit]

Economics[edit]

  • Henry of Ghent becomes the last major theologian to openly consider annuities as usurious contract. The end of the debate allows for the expansion of the budding practice of renten emission to become a staple of public finance in north-western Europe.[3]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ de Epalza, Miguel (1999). Negotiating cultures: bilingual surrender treaties in Muslim-Crusader Spain under James the Conqueror. Brill. p. 96. ISBN 90-04-11244-8. 
  2. ^ "Library & Archives - History". Oxford: Merton College. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  3. ^ Munro, John H. (2003). "The Medieval Origins of the Financial Revolution". The International History Review 15 (3): 506–562.