146 Lucina

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146 Lucina
146Lucina (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 146 Lucina based on its light curve.
Discovery[1] and designation
Discovered by Alphonse Borrelly
Discovery date June 8, 1875
Designations
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2][1]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 433.156 Gm (2.895 AU)
Perihelion 380.397 Gm (2.543 AU)
406.777 Gm (2.719 AU)
Eccentricity 0.065
1637.739 d (4.48 a)
18.04 km/s
152.155°
Inclination 13.074°
84.177°
143.509°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 131.893[2] km
Mass 2.4×1018 kg
Mean density
2.0 g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0369 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0699 km/s
0.0496 ± 0.0107[2]
Temperature ~169 K
C[2] (Tholen)
8.277[2]

146 Lucina is a main-belt asteroid that was discovered by Alphonse Borrelly on June 8, 1875, and named after Lucina, the Roman goddess of childbirth. It is large, dark and has a carbonaceous composition.

Photometric observations of this asteroid made during 1979 and 1981 gave a light curve with a period of 18.54 hours.[3]

Two stellar occultations by Lucina have been observed so far, in 1982 and 1989. During the first event, a possible small satellite with an estimated 5.7 km diameter was detected at a distance of 1,600 km from 146 Lucina.[4] A 1992 search using a CCD failed to discover a satellite larger than 0.6 km, although it may have been obscured by occultation mask.[5] Further evidence for a satellite emerged in 2003, this time based on astrometric measurements.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yeomans, Donald K., 146 Lucina, JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-03-30. 
  2. ^ a b c d Pravec, P. et al. (May 2012), Absolute Magnitudes of Asteroids and a Revision of Asteroid Albedo Estimates from WISE Thermal Observations, Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2012, Proceedings of the conference held May 16-20, 2012 in Niigata, Japan (1667), Bibcode:2012LPICo1667.6089P.  See Table 4.
  3. ^ Schober, H. J. (July 1983), The large C-type asteroids 146 Lucina and 410 Chloris, and the small S-type asteroids 152 Atala and 631 Philippina - Rotation periods and lightcurves, Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series 53: 71-75, Bibcode:1983A&AS...53...71S. 
  4. ^ Arlot, J. E. et al. (February 1985), A possible satellite of (146) Lucina, Icarus 61: 224-231, Bibcode:1985Icar...61..224A, doi:10.1016/0019-1035(85)90104-6. 
  5. ^ Stern, S. Alan; Barker, Edwin S. (December 1992), A CCD search for distant satellites of asteroids 3 Juno and 146 Lucina, In Lunar and Planetary Inst., Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 1991: 577-581, Bibcode:1992acm..proc..577S. 
  6. ^ Kikwaya, J.-B. et al. (March 2003), Does 146 Lucina Have a Satellite? An Astrometric Approach, 34th Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, March 17-21, 2003, League City, Texas, abstract no.1214, Bibcode:2003LPI....34.1214K.