148 Gallia

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148 Gallia
Discovery[1] and designation
Discovered by Paul Henry and Prosper Henry
Discovery date August 7, 1875
Designations
Named after
Gaul
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1][2]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 491.906 Gm (3.288 AU)
Perihelion 336.871 Gm (2.252 AU)
414.388 Gm (2.770 AU)
Eccentricity 0.187
1683.920 d (4.61 a)
17.74 km/s
123.742°
Inclination 25.299°
145.192°
252.131°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 83.45 ± 5.07[2] km
Mass (4.89 ± 1.67) × 1018[2] kg
Mean density
16.06 ± 6.22[2] g/cm3
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0273 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0517 km/s
20.664[3] h
0.10
Temperature ~167 K
GU[4] (Tholen)
7.72[5]

148 Gallia (as Greek Γαλλία) is a large main-belt asteroid that is named after the Latin name for France: Gaul. Gallia was discovered by the French brothers Paul Henry and Prosper Henry on August 7, 1875, but the credit for this discovery was given to Prosper.[6] Based upon its spectrum, this is a GU-type asteroid in the Tholen classification taxonomy, while Bus and Binzel (2002) categorize it as an S-type asteroid.[4]

Photometric observations of this asteroid at the European Southern Observatory in 1977–78 gave a light curve with a period of 0.86098 ± 0.00030 days (20.6635 ± 0.0072 h) and a brightness variation of 0.32 in magnitude.[3] A 2007 study at the Palmer Divide Observatory in Colorado Springs, Colorado yielded a period of 20.666 ± 0.002 h with a magnitude variation of 0.21.[5]

This object is the namesake of a family of 22–113 asteroids that share similar spectral properties and orbital elements. Hence they may have arisen from the same collisional event. All members have a relatively high orbital inclination.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yeomans, Donald K., "164 Eva", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-03-30. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b Surdej, A.; Surdej, J. (September 1979), "Photoelectric lightcurves and rotation period of the minor planet 148 Gallia", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series 37: 471–474, Bibcode:1979A&AS...37..471S. 
  4. ^ a b Lazzaro, D. et al. (November 2004), "S3OS2: the visible spectroscopic survey of 820 asteroids", Icarus 172 (1): 179–220, Bibcode:2004Icar..172..179L, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.06.006. 
  5. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (December 2007), "Initial Results of a Dedicated H-G Project", Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 34: 113–119, Bibcode:2007MPBu...34..113W. 
  6. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2012), Dictionary of Minor Planet Names (6th ed.), Springer, p. 26, ISBN 3642297188. 
  7. ^ Novaković, Bojan et al. (November 2011), "Families among high-inclination asteroids", Icarus 216 (1): 69–81, arXiv:1108.3740, Bibcode:2011Icar..216...69N, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.08.016.