14th Infantry Regiment (United States)

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14th Infantry Regiment
14th INF RGT COA.png
Coat of arms
Active 1861-
Country  United States
Branch Army
Type Infantry
Nickname Golden Dragons (special designation) [1]
Motto Right of the Line
Engagements American Civil War:
*Peninsula
*Manassas
*Antietam
*Fredericksburg
*Chancellorsville,
*Gettysburg
*Wilderness
*Spotsylvania
*Cold Harbor
*Petersburg
Indian Wars
War with Spain
China Relief Expedition
Philippine–American War
Mexican Expedition
World War II
Korean War
Vietnam War
Somalia
Afghanistan Campaign
Iraq Campaign
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Colonel Paul Octave Hebert (CSA)
Lt Col. John F. Reynolds (USA)
Charles Pomeroy Stone
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia 14 Inf Rgt DUI.jpg
U.S. Infantry Regiments
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13th Infantry Regiment 15th Infantry Regiment

The 14th Infantry Regiment ("Golden Dragons" [1]) is a United States Army light infantry regiment. It has been active in most major conflicts since its creation, including the American Civil War, Boxer Rebellion, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Operation Desert Storm, Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Gothic Serpent, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The 14th Infantry Regiment did not take part in combat during World War I.

It has also conducted peacekeeping and humanitarian missions in the Sinai Peninsula, Guantánamo Bay in Cuba, Bosnia, and Kosovo.

Two battalions of the 14th Infantry Regiment are currently active:

History[edit]

Civil War, 1861-66[edit]

In May 1861, President Abraham Lincoln called for the creation of nine additional Regular Army infantry regiments in preparation for the looming civil war. These regiments were designated the 11th through the 19th Infantry and organized as "three-battalion" regiments, each battalion containing eight companies of infantry, in contrast to the original ten regular regiments of infantry, which were organized on the traditional ten-company line.

The 14th Infantry Regiment was organized on 3 May 1861 at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut, in two battalions with the third added in April 1862. Part of the Army of the Potomac, the regiment saw its first combat action in the Peninsula Campaign 17 May 1862. The Regiment was assigned to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac and fought at Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness and Petersburg.

In recognition of the regiment's heroic performance of duty during twelve of the bloodiest campaigns of the American Civil War, General George Meade, awarded the 14th Infantry Regiment the place of honor at the "Right of the Line" in the Grand Review of the Armies in Washington, DC at the end of the war. This is where the regiment takes its motto "The Right of the Line".

Following the Civil War, the Army was reorganized by Congress in July 1866, and the 14th was divided into three regiments, each battalion receiving two additional companies and being organized along traditional lines. The 1st Battalion retained the designation of the 14th Infantry, while the 2nd Battalion became the 23rd Infantry and the 3rd Battalion the 32nd Infantry.

Indian Wars, 1866-78[edit]

The regiment took part in two Indian campaigns and detachments were in two other campaigns (including the 1866-1868 Snake War) but not in sufficient strength to entitle the regiment as a whole to participation.

These campaigns are:

Spanish American War, 1898[edit]

The regiment was at the capture of Manila in the Spanish American War, and in the fighting around the same city in 1899.

China Relief Expedition, 1900[edit]

Corporal Titus scaling the walls of Peking.

During the early years of the 20th century, the 14th Infantry Regiment was deployed to China to help put down the Boxer Rebellion. The 14th was the spearhead in winning a victory over the Chinese army at the Battle of Yangcun. At the Tung Pien Gate in Peking, the Regiment was taking heavy fire and was unable to effectively engage the enemy. To counteract, volunteers were called for to scale the wall and lay down suppressive fire from the better vantage point while the rest of the regiment followed. Corporal Calvin P. Titus, a band member and chaplains assistant from E Company, volunteered, and with rope slung over his shoulder scaled the wall and laid down the suppressive fire that allowed more and more soldiers behind him to follow.

For his actions, he was awarded the Medal of Honor as well as receiving an appointment to West Point. For their conduct of the operation, the 14th Infantry Regiment was rewarded by the Chinese government a large amount of silver bullion which was later fashioned into an ornamented punchbowl with matching cups and other dinnerware that is still kept in 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment headquarters.

World War II, 1943-45[edit]

In June 1943 the Golden Dragons were ordered to Camp Carson, Colorado where the Regiment was assigned to the 71st Light Division on 10 July 1943. The 14th along with the rest of the 71st Division underwent unit combat training at Camp Carson then at Camp Roberts, California and at Fort Benning Georgia. At Fort Benning the 71st was reorganized and redesignated as the 71st Infantry Division.

On 25 January the Golden Dragons sailed from New York, with the rest of the 71st Division arriving in Le Havre on 7 February 1945. The 14th then moved some 350 miles (560 km) across France. At Ratzwiller the 71st Division relieved the 100th Division. On 21 March 1945 the 14th took part in the 71st Division's breaching the Siegfried Line and the capture of Pirmasens. On 30 March 1945 the 71st crossed the Rhine River and went into reserve near Frankfurt.

The 14th Infantry then participated along with its sister regiment the 5th Infantry in the elimination of bypassed German forces north of Hanau, Germany on 2 April 1945. On 13 April 1945 the Golden Dragons cut the main Berlin to Munich autobahn. On 14–16 April 1945 the 14th participated in its heaviest combat as the 71st Division seized the town of Bayreuth, Germany. Bypassing German strongpoints the 71st Division sped south with the 14th Infantry crossing the Danube River and participating in the seizure of the city of Regensburg on 27 April 1945. From there the 14th made an assault crossing of the Isar River under fire and entered Austria on 2 May 1945. The 71st Division linked up with advancing Soviet Army units east of Linz, Austria on 8 May 1945 and hostilities ceased on 9 May 1945.

Korean War, 1950-53[edit]

In responding to the North Korean invasion of South Korea in June 1950 the U.S. Army found itself desperately short of units to halt the Communist advance. Continental U.S. (CONUS) units were stripped of personnel and equipment and sent to Korea on a priority basis. On 21 July 1950 the 3rd Battalion, 14th Infantry was reassigned to the Far East Command and then to the 1st Cavalry Division where it was redesignated as the 3rd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment. Unlike other units that had been cobbled together at the last minute, the 3rd Battalion, 14th Infantry was at full strength and due to its rigorous training in mountain warfare was in excellent shape to fight in the Korean mountains.

On 23 July 1951, the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry was transferred to Fort Benning where it was assigned to and redesignated as a battalion in one of the 3rd Infantry Division's regiments. The 3rd Division was initially sent to Japan then to Korea. The remaining personnel and equipment of the 14th Infantry at Camp Carson were reassigned to other CONUS units. On 1 August 1951 the 14th Infantry less personnel and equipment was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division then fighting in Korea. To man and equip the 14th Infantry the assets of the 34th Infantry Regiment of the 24th Division, then conducting infantry training in Japan, were used. The 14th Infantry moved to Korea where it replaced the 24th Infantry Regiment, which was being inactivated as part of the integration of the Army.

The next two years found the Regiment in almost constant combat along the 38th parallel defending places like "The Punchbowl" and "Porkchop Hill". The 14th Infantry's service in Korea earned the Regiment five campaign streamers and a Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for gallantry at Munsan-Ni. Three soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor for their actions in Korea; Sergeant Donn F. Porter, Private First Class Ernest E. West, and Private First Class Bryant H. Womack.[2]

Vietnam, 1965-72[edit]

UH-1D helicopters airlift members of the 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment from the Filhol Rubber Plantation area to a new staging area, during Operation "Wahiawa," a search and destroy mission conducted by the 25th Infantry Division, northeast of Cu Chi, 1966

1st Battalion, 14th Infantry: In the fall of 1965 the 25th Division received its expected orders to Vietnam. The initial brigade to go was the 3rd Brigade composed of the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, the 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry and the 2nd Battalion, 9th Artillery. The urgency of getting the 3rd Brigade to the Central Highlands of Vietnam led to the Army and Air Force undertaking Operation Blue Light, a massive airlift of the entire 3rd Brigade from Hawaii to Pleiku. The airlift began on 28 December 1965 and was successfully concluded on 17 January 1966.

Commanded by LTC Gilbert Procter, Jr., the 1/14th spent most of 1966 operating along the Cambodian border as part of the 3rd Brigade's mission of preventing the North Vietnamese from cutting South Vietnam in half. In November 1966, elements of the 1st Battalion engaged two battalions of the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) inflicting heavy losses on the enemy. Among the numerous Golden Dragons performing heroically during these engagements, two members of the 1st Battalion - 1st Lt. Joseph Grant and Sgt. Ted Belcher were posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. Addenda: 1st Battalion Operations Vietnam, 1966-1967.

The 1st Battalion was reassigned to the 4th Infantry Division on 1 August 1967 as part of the exchange of 3rd Brigades between the 25th and 4th Infantry Divisions. The 1st Battalion participated in a total of 12 Vietnam campaigns, receiving the Navy Presidential Unit Citation for gallantry in action at Chu Lai. Company A received the Valorous Unit Award for action in Quang Ngai Province. In addition the 1st Battalion received four awards of the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm and one award of the Vietnam Civil Action Medal, First Class.

On 8 December 1970 the 1st Battalion was reduced to zero strength at An Khe, Vietnam with the exception of a battalion color guard which returned the battalion colors to Schofield Barracks. On 15 December 1970 the 1st Battalion was reassigned to the 25th Division and the 3rd Battalion, 14th Infantry was inactivated with its personnel and equipment reassigned to the 1st Battalion.

2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry: The 1st Brigade of the 25th Division to which the 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry was assigned was scheduled to be the last of the three maneuver brigades to deploy to Vietnam. The Brigade was shy two of its three infantry battalions. When the 25th was reorganized from battle groups to battalions in 1963 two of the nine authorized infantry battalions were not activated as a cost-saving measure. Initially the plan was to activate and train two new battalions for the 1st Brigade but the timetable was too short. Adding to the problem was the need to heavily levy the 2nd Battalion for fillers for infantry battalions of the 3rd Brigade, which left in December 1965 and of the 2nd Brigade, which departed Schofield in January 1966. To round out the 1st Brigade two battalions assigned to Alaska—the 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry and the 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry—were reassigned to the 1st Brigade on 14 January 1966.

By February 1966 the 2nd Battalion began receiving large numbers of replacements, most directly out of Advanced Individual Training. This resulted in an accelerated unit training program to ready the battalion for deployment. To enhance developing unit cohesiveness and to create espirit-de-corps the 2nd Battalion took the informal nickname of Battle Dragons. A "Battle Dragon Chant" was also written and used in battalion formations.

In early April, the 1st Brigade was alerted for movement to Vietnam. On 16 April 1966 the USNS Nelson M. Walker sailed from Pearl Harbor with the entire 1st Brigade aboard. The ship arrived at Vung Tau near Saigon on 28 April. The 2nd Battalion left the ship on 30 April and was moved by truck and aircraft to Cu Chi.

In their first two years in Vietnam the Battle Dragons of the 2nd Battalion made it clear to the Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese that they were prepared to meet and defeat any attack on their unit. And they would take the offensive to seek out and destroy the enemy wherever he could be found.

In 1967 the 2nd Battalion conducted a variety of missions that took the battalion from the Mekong Delta at the beginning of the year to War Zone C at the close. The Battle Dragons shifted their base camp from Cu Chi to Tay Ninh in conjunction with stepped-up operations in War Zone C.

The operations of 1967 ranged in scope from security missions near Bien Hoa during Operation Uniontown and at Dau Tieng during Junction City to civil action east of Cu Chi on Barking Sands, and finally, during Operation Yellowstone, a large-scale offensive operations in War Zone C at Katum.

In its over four years of combat in Vietnam, the 2nd Battalion received participation credit for 12 of the campaigns of the Vietnam War. The battalion received two awards of the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm and one award of the Vietnam Civic Action Medal First Class. On 8 December 1970 the 2nd Battalion left Vietnam and returned to Schofield Barracks. The battalion was inactivated on 5 June 1972. Addenda: 2nd Battalion Operations Vietnam, 1966-1968.

3rd Battalion, 14th Infantry: To provide for a Pacific area strategic reserve for contingencies other than the ongoing Vietnam War, the Army activated the 4th Brigade, 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks on 6 December 1969. The 3rd Battalion, 14th Infantry was activated as one of the 4th Brigade's three infantry battalions.

The 3rd Battalion (descending from Company C) was initially activated under CARS as the 3rd Battle Group, 14th Infantry on 1 June 1959 and assigned to the 102nd Infantry Division, U.S. Army Reserve at Kansas City, Missouri. The 3rd Battle Group was reorganized and redesignated as the 3rd Battalion, 14th Infantry on 1 April 1963. On 31 December 1965 the 3rd Battalion was inactivated. It was allotted back to the Regular Army on 6 December1969 and activated at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii as a component of the 4th Brigade, 25th Division.

As the 25th Division returned to Schofield Barracks from Vietnam to resume its traditional mission of being the strategic reserve for the Pacific area the 4th Brigade along with the 3rd Battalion 14th Infantry was inactivated on 15 December 1970. The personnel and equipment of the 3rd Battalion was used to re-man and re-equip the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry.

Company E served in Vietnam from 30 June 1971 to 20 November 1972 as a separate rifle security company assigned to the U.S. Army Support Command with the mission of guarding the Long Binh support facility. Company E received campaign participation credit for the last four campaigns of the Vietnam War. In 1986 it was assigned to the 25th Division as Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion. (See below.)

Post Vietnam[edit]

As part of the overall post-Vietnam draw-down of the Army only the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division remained active. The 1st Battalion 14th Infantry was assigned to the 1st Brigade and the 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry was inactivated but remained assigned to the Tropic Lightning.

Somalia, 1993[edit]

On 3 October 1993, 2-14 Infantry was part of the quick reaction force which helped rescue members of Special Operations Task Force Ranger which had conducted a daylight raid on an enemy stronghold.

2-14 Infantry fought a moving battle for 3 hours from the gates of the Port of Mogadishu to the Rangers' perimeter. They successfully linked up with the Rangers and then began to withdraw under fire.

During the 12 hour ordeal, 29 soldiers from 2nd Battalion were wounded and 2 were killed (PFC James Martin and Sgt. Cornell Houston).

Bosnia, 2002[edit]

On 19 March 2002, two companies of 1-14 Infantry deployed to Bosnia. Bravo Company's mission was to defend a critical bridge site, while Charlie Company was to act as the theater reserve.

2003–present[edit]

In March 2003, 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, deployed from Fort Drum in preparation for the invasion of Iraq. As part of Task Force Viking, the battalion was attached to 10th Special Forces Group in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.[3] The battalion initial linked-up with 10th Special Forces in Constanta, Romania, then deployed to Irbil, Mosul, and Kirkuk. This task force fighting with Kurdish rebels defeated six Iraqi divisions.[4] The battalion re-deployed to Fort Drum, New York, six months later.

2-14 IN also deployed to Iraq in June 2004 as part of 2nd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. It served initially in the Radwaneeya area southwest of the airport, with the mission of denying attacks on aircraft or the airport itself. In November 2004, the battalion operated in the Abu Guraib district, where it fought a complex urban-based insurgency. In addition to the fighting in Abu Ghraib, Bravo Co was attached to 1-41 Inf, and deployed to Sadr City in order to fight the Mahadi Army and its leader, Muqtada Al Sadr. Bravo Co fought for more than four months in a street to street, house-to-house battle that took the lives of three American soldiers from the 14th. The battalion lost 14 soldiers total killed in action during this deployment. The battalion was instrumental in keeping the Fallujah and Baghdad insurgencies from connecting and staging large-scale attacks on American positions.[citation needed] The battalion redeployed in June 2005.

In August 2006, the battalion redeployed to Iraq after a brief reset and training period. Their mission was to secure the Shakria triangle. The battalion assaulted and secured the Yusifiya thermal power plant, an Al-Qaeda stronghold. 2-14 IN fought a counter-insurgency in the Abu Farris, North Kargoli, Sadr al Yousifya and Janabi regions. The battalion helped enable the Brigade mission, which was to secure the rural hinterland south of Baghdad for the Iraqi government, alongside the Iraqi Army. One 2-14 Soldier, SGT Adkins of Delta Company, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross posthumously for sacrificing himself to save his comrades at a checkpoint. He tackled a suicide bomber who was about to attack the checkpoint, absorbing the blast with his body. A hard-fought campaign, 2-14 IN suffered 22 soldiers killed in action. The Golden Dragons redeployed to Ft Drum in October 2007.

On 15 October 2009, 2-14 IN deployed again in support of OIF with 2nd BCT, 10th MTN. They occupied and closed several Joint Security Stations (JSSs), labelled as JSS 763, JSS 799, JSS SUJ, and JSS Beladiyat. All locations were turned over to Iraqi Federal Police by May 2010. 2-14 relocated to Camp Stryker on the Victory Base Complex after closing all locations. Operating out of Camp Stryker and FOB Falcon, in coordination with 1st Brigade 3rd Infantry Division Advise and Assist Brigade, troops conducted humanitarian aid missions and assisted the local medical community in providing care to local national civilians. 2-14 redeployed to Fort Drum, New York, on 1 August 2010.

In January 2004, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, as part of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division (Light), deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, where they served in the cities of Kirkuk, Tuz, An Najaf, Samarra, Tal Afar, and Mosul. Upon redeployment to Schofield Barracks in February 2005, the battalion was awarded with the Valorous Unit Award and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq.[citation needed]

In December 2007, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment organized as Combined Task Force 1-14 (CTF 1-14) serving in combat from 15 January 2008 through 15 January 2009 during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) 07 - 09 vicinity Tarmiyah, Iraq while assigned to the 2d Stryker Brigade, 25th ID and Multinational Division-Baghdad (MND-B). The 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment "Golden Dragons", deploying from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, joined soldiers from the Macedonia's Special Operations Forces and operated in partnership with the Iraqi Army (IA), Iraqi Police (IP), 1st Infantry Division's Military Transition Teams, and the 18th Military Police Brigade's Police Transition Teams to form CTF 1-14 in December 2007.

Over the next 14 months, CTF 1-14 disintegrated numerous terrorist and insurgent cells, eroded AQI Northern Belt's strategic and operational caches, and rendered the enemy incapable of stemming the rapid progress throughout the Qada in security, ISF capability, markets, essential services, and governance.[citation needed] In the first 11 months, CTF 1-14 had executed over 30 named battalion-level missions: Operation DRAGON NA'AR, Operation DRAGON VOLCANO I-II, Operation DRAGON GUARD, Operation VIGILANT DRAGON, Operation DRAGON MUKHABA, Operation DRAGON SAYTARA, Operation LUAU, Operation DRAGON MASHAREEA, Operation FORGIVING DRAGON I-XI, Operation THEAB TARIQ, Operation TAREEQ TANEEN, Operation DRAGON STRETCH I-II, Operation DRAGON HIMAYA, Operation KAMEHAMEHA, and Operation DRAGON VOTE. Collectively, CTF 1-14 would also execute over 60 additional named company-level operations. These operations resulted in the capture of 52 battalion and higher high-value individuals (HVI) and a total of 243 targeted insurgents, 40% of the Stryker Brigade's total. CTF 1-14 also captured and destroyed over 175 caches and eroded the enemy resources so severely that for months there was a dramatic decline in military munitions used by the enemy.[citation needed] The pace and precision of these offensive operations dramatically increased security and set the conditions for gains across all lines of effort, including the hiring and training of local IA and IP, the complete revitalization of the local Iraqi economy, the improvement of local Iraqi infrastructure, including schools and roads, and an enhancement of local governance.[citation needed] All of this was accomplished in the decisive and most contested terrain in Baghdad's northern belt, an area of operations (AO) which early in the deployment was established as the 2d Stryker Combat Team's main effort.

By the time CTF 1-14 assumed responsibility of the Tarmiyah Qada, there were many areas and villages that had not seen US forces in well over a year and the threat of Large Buried Improvised Explosives Devices (LBIED) limited routine movement to less than 35 kilometers (22 mi) along two major roads. By August 2008, CTF 1-14 controlled the entire Qada, routinely patrolled its over-400-square-kilometer area, and rendered the enemy unable to sustain effective attacks anywhere in the CTF 1-14 battle-space. The two areas previously receiving the highest frequency of improvised explosives devices (IED) attacks are now[when?] a thriving market and an IA checkpoint with almost no enemy activity. This control and freedom of improvement was in part attributable to a dramatically increased forward presence that is unmatched throughout MND-B.[citation needed]

In January 2008, less than one third of the previous unit was forward, securing the population in their communities. CTF 1-14 quadrupled the number of platoons and companies forward near the population centers securing the Iraqi people, enabling CTF 1-14 leaders and soldiers to develop close relationships with the local Iraqi leaders, develop the trust and confidence of the Iraqi people, provide quick action against developing threats, and give responsive support to the Iraqi people and ISF. The effect was so profound that the population believed that CTF 1-14 was twice the size of the previous (and identical) unit.[citation needed] During this time, CTF 1-14's soldiers suffered from the elements, cramped conditions (living in Stryker Infantry Vehicles and dilapidated hallways), poor sanitation, and limited communication with loved ones back home. After several months, CTF 1-14 built safe forward bases for its soldiers with reliable electricity, AC/heat, latrines, showers, sleeping areas, cable TV, Internet, and phones at al of CTF 1-14's Golden Dragon companies.[citation needed]

In early 2008, there were fewer than 30 IA soldiers assisting US forces to secure Qada Tarmiyah. Ctf 1-14 acted to partner with the 37th IA Brigade as it went through force generation, training the 3rd Battalion, 37th IA Brigade and executing developmental operations with the balance of the battalions. This close partnership quickly increased IA combat power operating in the Tarmiyah Qada by a factor of 20 from a single platoon at a single checkpoint in Tarmiyah to a brigade (-) executing partnered company level operations and living forward at the JSSs and patrol bases throughout the entire CTF 1-14 area.[citation needed] IA patrols became ubiquitous in the Qada and IA leadership was coached to develop close working relationships with tribal, government, and police leadership. By July 2008, the 37th IA Brigade had been relieved in place by the 36th IA Brigade, with whom CTF 1-14 continued to approach of close partnership and shared responsibility and risk, and quickly progressed to the point of full tactical over-watch in one third of its area and completed a decisive transfer of the Sons of Iraq (SOI) to the control of the 36th Brigade. Both the 37th and 36th Brigades are now well trained and the 36th Brigade IA is well prepared to secure this Qada with little Coalition Force assistance. The successful partnership with the IP was no less impressive. Throughout 2007, Al Qaeda had forced the withdrawal of all IP from the city, but by June 2008 CTF 1-14 had reestablished the IP district headquarters in Tarmiyah and substantially enhanced the local IP's capability to fight an urban insurgency. The IPs are now increasingly serving warrants, routinely enforcing the rule of law, and executing local recruiting activities. CTF was equally aggressive in pursuing its non-lethal objectives and achieved unprecedented success in market, essential services, and governance development. In January 2008 all of the markets in Tarmiyah and along the Baghdad-Mosul Highway were brown, lifeless, and more likely to be used for an enemy ambush than a place of business. The Mushadah Market exemplifies the progress made in all nine of the Tarmiyah Qada's markets. By mid-summer 2008, these markets had only three functioning shops, but with the return of security, the applica tion of numerous small entrepreneurial grants to prospective business owners, and the targeted application of essential services projects, this market (and most others) has bloomed with color, activity and a variety of new shops. More specifically, this single market now has well over 250 shops and is growing rapidly; note that this is 80 times the number of shops present in January 2008 and more than triples the number under the pre-war economy.

When CTF 1-14 assumed responsibility for the Tarmiyah Qada, deteriorating security had resulted in every single US dollar and Iraqi dinar having been withdrawn from all projects and there was no government budget and little connectivity between village, township, and Qada.[citation needed] The Qada government and tribes were completely disassociated from Baghdad and almost no one dared travel to the city of Tarmiyah. As CTF 1-14 secured the Qada, it initiated a bold plan to simultaneously invest in education, roads, markets and essential services while using the project management process to exercise atrophied local governance functions. Beginning at the township/Nahia level with school projects, CTF 1-14 continued to raise the expectation for governance participation and oversight, until almost all of the latent governance functions at the Nahia ande Qada level were being fully exercised and Iraqis were selecting, prioritizing, managing and quality assuring/quality controlling (QA/QC) all of their own projects. Encouraged by their progress and security, the Tarmiyah leaders continued to reach out to Baghdad, holding two Joint Rural Planning Committees (JRPC) and a high visibility Expo where key governance and reconstruction issues were discussed. These and other media events highlighted their successes, demonstrated that Tarmiyah was again ready to receive GoI investment, and helped the Tarmiyah Qada reconnect with Baghdad. CTF 1-14 and the Tarmiyah government, in a period of nine months, had rebuilt 50 schools and completed or initiated an additional 85 essential services projects for over $24 million and secured projects and budgets from the GoI for over $40 million.[citation needed]

Perhaps the best measure of CTF 1-14's effect is the profound increase in cooperation from the Iraqi people who, because of the enormous multi-pronged lethal and non-lethal efforts of CTF 1-14, became committed to ridding their communities of insurgents. Because the Iraqi people placed more and more trust in CTF 1-14, the local populace began to believe they were secure from retribution, and have since experienced a profound improvement in their own quality of life.[citation needed] As evidence of this, local Iraqis have continued to share information which prevents the insurgent from hiding among the population. By early autumn 2008, Al Qaeda had no safe haven in the CTF 1-14's AO. CTF 1-14 has eroded Al Qaeda's resources and has confiscated over 100 large weapons and explosives caches from areas Al Qaeda believed beyond CF's reach. CTF 1-14 continually disintegrated Al Qaeda's networks of leadership, resources, and membership, thus effectively defeating his every effort to reestablish an effective presence.[5]

In July 2010, 1-14 deployed again to Iraq with 2nd Advise and Assist Brigade, 25th Infantry Division as part of the final stages of OIF-OND.

Coat of arms[edit]

Symbolism: Shield: The regiment was organized in 1861 and played many notable parts during the American Civil War including all the Virginia Campaigns from the Siege of Yorktown in 1862 to October 1864. The regiment was in Sykes' regular division of the 5th Corps of the Army of the Potomac whose badge was a white cross patée. At Gaines Hill and Malvern Hill the division commander praised the regiment and the brigade commended it at Second Manassas. It performed a most difficult service at Antietam, was in the repulse of the crucial attack of the enemy at Gettysburg, and made a gallant charge at the Wilderness.

In later years the regiment took part in two Indian Campaigns indicated by the two arrows and detachments were in two others but not in sufficient strength to entitle the regiment as a whole to participation.

It was at the capture of Manila in the Spanish American War indicated by the castle, and in the fighting around the same city in 1899 indicated by the palm, and in the China Relief Expedition as shown by the dragon.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors an imperial Chinese dragon affronté Or scaled and finned Azure incensed and armed Gules.

Motto: The motto is the much prized remark made by General Meade directing the station of the regiment in the Review just after the American Civil War.

Background: The coat of arms was approved on 10 December 1921.

Distinctive unit insignia[edit]

Description: A gold color metal and enamel device consisting of a gold imperial Chinese dragon placed against a red conventionalized Spanish castle with the motto "THE RIGHT OF THE LINE" in gold letters on a blue ribbon scroll.

Symbolism: The dragon is the crest of the regiment and the castle is one of the charges on the regimental shield. The motto is the motto of the regiment.

Background: The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved on 6 November 1924. It was amended on 11 June 1925 to correct the color of the motto letters.

Lineage & honors[edit]

14th Infantry Regiment[edit]

  • Constituted 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as the 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry
  • Reorganized and redesignated 30 April 1862 as the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry
  • Reorganized and redesignated 21 September 1866 as the 14th Infantry
  • Consolidated 26 July 1869 with the 45th Infantry, Veteran Reserve Corps (constituted 21 September 1866), and consolidated unit designated as the 14th Infantry
  • Assigned 27 July 1918 to the 19th Division
  • Relieved 14 February 1919 from assignment to the 19th Division
  • Assigned 10 July 1943 to the 71st Light Division (later redesignated as the 71st Infantry Division)
  • Relieved 1 May 1946 from assignment to the 71st Infantry Division
  • Inactivated 1 September 1946 in Germany
  • Activated 1 October 1948 at Camp Carson, Colorado
  • Assigned 1 August 1951 to the 25th Infantry Division
  • Relieved 1 February 1957 from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division and reorganized as a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System

Campaign participation credit

Civil War

  • Peninsula
  • Manassas
  • Antietam
  • Fredericksburg
  • Chancellorsville
  • Gettysburg
  • Wilderness
  • Spotsylvania
  • Cold Harbor
  • Petersburg
  • Virginia 1862
  • Virginia 1863

Indian Wars

  • Little Big Horn
  • Bannocks
  • Arizona 1866
  • Wyoming 1874

Spanish-American War

  • Manila

China Relief Expedition

  • Yang-tsun
  • Peking

Philippine–American War

  • Manila
  • Laguna de Bay
  • Zapote River
  • Cavite
  • Luzon 1899

World War II

  • Rhineland
  • Central Europe

Korean War

  • UN Summer-Fall Offensive
  • Second Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer-Fall 1952
  • Third Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer 1953

Vietnam

  • Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase II
  • Counteroffensive, Phase III
  • Tet Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase IV
  • Counteroffensive, Phase V
  • Counteroffensive, Phase VI
  • Tet 69/Counteroffensive
  • Summer-Fall 1969
  • Winter-Spring 1970
  • Sanctuary Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase VII
  • Consolidation I
  • Consolidation II
  • Cease-Fire

Decorations

  • Presidential Unit Citation (Navy), Streamer embroidered CHU LAI
  • Valorous Unit Award, Streamer embroidered MOGADISHU
  • Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered MUNSAN-NI

1st Battalion[edit]

Constituted 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as Company A, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry

Organized 8 July 1861 at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut

Reorganized and redesignated 30 April 1862 as Company A, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry

Reorganized and redesignated 21 September 1866 as Company A, 14th Infantry

Consolidated 26 July 1869 with Company G, 45th Infantry, Veteran Reserve Corps (constituted 21 September 1866), and consolidated unit designated as Company A, 14th Infantry (14th Infantry assigned 27 July 1918 to the 19th Division; relieved 14 February 1919 from assignment to the 19th Division; assigned 10 July 1943 to the 71st Light Division [later redesignated as the 71st Infantry Division]; relieved 1 May 1946 from assignment to the 71st Infantry Division)

Inactivated 1 September 1946 in Germany

Activated 1 October 1948 at Camp Carson, Colorado (14th Infantry assigned 1 August 1951 to the 25th Infantry Division) Reorganized and redesignated 1 February 1957 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battle Group, 14th Infantry, and remained assigned to the 25th Infantry Division (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated)

Reorganized and redesignated 26 August 1963 as the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry

Relieved 1 August 1967 from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division and assigned to the 4th Infantry Division

Relieved 15 December 1970 from assignment to the 4th Infantry Division and assigned to the 25th Infantry Division

Campaign participation credit

Civil War

  • Peninsula
  • Manassas
  • Antietam
  • Fredericksburg
  • Chancellorsville
  • Gettysburg
  • Wilderness
  • Spotsylvania
  • Cold Harbor
  • Petersburg
  • Virginia 1862
  • Virginia 1863

Indian Wars

  • Little Big Horn
  • Bannocks
  • Arizona 1866
  • Wyoming 1874

Spanish-American War

  • Manila

China Relief Expedition Yang-tsun Peking

Philippine–American War

  • Manila
  • Laguna de Bay
  • Zapote River

Cavite

  • Luzon 1899

World War II

  • Rhineland
  • Central Europe

Korean War

  • UN Summer-Fall Offensive
  • Second Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer-Fall 1952
  • Third Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer 1953

Vietnam

  • Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase II
  • Counteroffensive, Phase III
  • Tet Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase IV
  • Counteroffensive, Phase V
  • Counteroffensive, Phase VI
  • Tet 69/Counteroffensive
  • Summer-Fall 1969
  • Winter-Spring 1970
  • Sanctuary Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase VII

Decorations

  • Presidential Unit Citation (Navy), Streamer embroidered CHU LAI
  • Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered MUNSAN-NI
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1966-1967
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1967-1969
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1969-1970
  • Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1967-1969

Company A additionally entitled to: Valorous Unit Award, Streamer embroidered QUANG NGAI PROVINCE

2nd Battalion[edit]

Constituted 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as Company B, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry

Organized 8 July 1861 at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut

Reorganized and redesignated 30 April 1862 as Company B, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry

Reorganized and redesignated 21 September 1866 as Company B, 14th Infantry

Consolidated 26 July 1869 with Company A, 45th Infantry, Veteran Reserve Corps (constituted 21 September 1866), and consolidated unit designated as Company B, 14th Infantry (14th Infantry assigned 27 July 1918 to the 19th Division; relieved 14 February 1919 from assignment to the 19th Division; assigned 10 July 1943 to the 71st Light Division [later redesignated as the 71st Infantry Division]; relieved 1 May 1946 from assignment to the 71st Infantry Division)

Inactivated 1 September 1946 in Germany

Activated 1 October 1948 at Camp Carson, Colorado (14th Infantry assigned 1 August 1951 to the 25th Infantry Division)

Inactivated 1 February 1957 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, and relieved from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division

Redesignated 17 May 1957 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battle Group, 14th Infantry (organic elements concurrently constituted)

Battle Group activated 25 May 1957 at Fort Benning, Georgia

Assigned 1 July 1958 to the 1st Infantry Brigade

Inactivated 16 May 1960 at Fort Benning, Georgia

Relieved 25 June 1960 from assignment to the 1st Infantry Brigade

  • Redesignated 21 June 1963 as the 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry, and assigned to the 25th Infantry Division

Activated 26 August 1963 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

Inactivated 5 June 1972 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

Relieved 17 January 1986 from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division, assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, and activated at Fort Benning, Georgia

Campaign participation credit

Civil War

  • Peninsula
  • Manassas
  • Antietam
  • Fredericksburg
  • Chancellorsville
  • Gettysburg
  • Wilderness
  • Spotsylvania
  • Cold Harbor
  • Petersburg
  • Virginia 1862
  • Virginia 1863

Indian Wars

  • Little Big Horn
  • Bannocks
  • Arizona 1866
  • Wyoming 1874

Spanish-American War Manila

China Relief Expedition Yang-tsun Peking

Philippine–American War Manila

  • Laguna de Bay
  • Zapote River

Cavite

  • Luzon 1899

World War II

  • Rhineland
  • Central Europe

Korean War

  • UN Summer-Fall Offensive
  • Second Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer-Fall 1952
  • Third Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer 1953

Vietnam

  • Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase II
  • Counteroffensive, Phase III
  • Tet Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase IV
  • Counteroffensive, Phase V
  • Counteroffensive, Phase VI
  • Tet 69/Counteroffensive
  • Summer-Fall 1969
  • Winter-Spring 1970
  • Sanctuary Counteroffensive
  • Counteroffensive, Phase VII

Afghanistan

  • Elements of 2-14 are currently providing security to SFAAT teams in eastern Paktika Province*

Decorations

  • Valorous Unit Award, Streamer embroidered MOGADISHU
  • Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered MUNSAN-NI
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1966-1968
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1968-1970
  • Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1966-1970

3rd Battalion[edit]

Lineage and honors

Constituted 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as Company F, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry

Organized 8 July 1861 at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut

Reorganized and redesignated 30 April 1862 as Company F, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry

Reorganized and redesignated 21 September 1866 as Company F, 14th Infantry

Consolidated 26 July 1869 with Company C, 45th Infantry, Veteran Reserve Corps (constituted 21 September 1866), and consolidated unit designated as Company C, 14th Infantry

(14th Infantry assigned 27 July 1918 to the 19th Division; relieved 14 February 1919 from assignment to the 19th Division; assigned 10 July 1943 to the 71st Light Division [later redesignated as the 71st Infantry Division]; relieved 1 May 1946 from assignment to the 71st Infantry Division)

Inactivated 1 September 1946 in Germany

Activated 1 October 1948 at Camp Carson, Colorado

(14th Infantry assigned 1 August 1951 to the 25th Infantry Division)

Inactivated 1 February 1957 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, and relieved from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division; concurrently, redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battle Group, 14th Infantry

Withdrawn 11 May 1959 from the Regular Army, allotted to the Army Reserve, and assigned to the 102d Infantry Division (organic elements concurrently constituted)

Battle Group activated 1 June 1959 with Headquarters at Kansas City, Missouri (Headquarters and Headquarters Company concurrently consolidated with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 406th Infantry, and consolidated unit designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battle Group, 14th Infantry

Reorganized and redesignated 1 April 1963 as the 3d Battalion, 14th Infantry

Inactivated 30 December 1965 at Kansas City, Missouri, and relieved from assignment to the 102d Infantry Division

Withdrawn 6 December 1969 from the Army Reserve, allotted to the Regular Army, assigned to the 25th Infantry Division, and activated at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

Inactivated 15 December 1970 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

Relieved 2 March 1986 from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division, assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, and activated at Fort Benning, Georgia

Inactivated 15 April 1996 at Fort Drum, New York, and relieved from assignment to the 10th Mountain Division

Campaign participation credit Civil War

  • Peninsula
  • Manassas
  • Antietam
  • Fredericksburg

Chancellorsville Gettysburg

  • Wilderness
  • Spotsylvania
  • Cold Harbor
  • Petersburg
  • Virginia 1862
  • Virginia 1863

Indian Wars

  • Little Big Horn
  • Bannocks

Arizona 1866 Wyoming 1874

War with Spain

  • Manila

China Relief Expedition Yang-tsun Peking

Philippine–American War

  • Manila
  • Laguna de Bay
  • Zapote River

Cavite

  • Luzon 1899

World War II

  • Rhineland
  • Central Europe

Korean War

  • UN Summer-Fall Offensive
  • Second Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer-Fall 1952
  • Third Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer 1953

DECORATIONS

  • Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered MUNSAN-NI

5th Battalion[edit]

Lineage and honors

Constituted 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as Company E, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry

Organized 8 July 1861 at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut

Reorganized and redesignated 30 April 1862 as Company E, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry

Reorganized and redesignated 21 September 1866 as Company E, 14th Infantry

Consolidated 26 July 1869 with Company D, 45th Infantry, Veteran Reserve Corps (constituted 21 September 1866), and consolidated unit designated as Company E, 14th Infantry

(14th Infantry assigned 27 July 1918 to the 19th Division; relieved 14 February 1919 from assignment to the 19th Division; assigned 10 July 1943 to the 71st Light Division [later redesignated as the 71st Infantry Division]; relieved 1 May 1946 from assignment to the 71st Infantry Division)

Inactivated 1 September 1946 in Germany

Activated 1 October 1948 at Camp Carson, Colorado

(14th Infantry assigned 1 August 1951 to the 25th Infantry Division)

Inactivated 1 February 1957 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, and relieved from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division; concurrently, redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Battle Group, 14th Infantry

Redesignated 21 December 1960 as Company E, 14th Infantry

Activated 24 December 1960 in Korea

Inactivated 1 January 1966 in Korea

Activated 30 June 1971 in Vietnam

Inactivated 26 November 1972 in Vietnam

Redesignated 16 December 1986 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 14th Infantry, assigned to the 25th Infantry Division, and activated at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated)

Battalion inactivated 15 August 1995 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, and relieved from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division

Campaign participation credit Civil War

  • Peninsula
  • Manassas
  • Antietam
  • Fredericksburg
  • Chancellorsville
  • Gettysburg
  • Wilderness
  • Spotsylvania
  • Cold Harbor
  • Petersburg
  • Virginia 1862
  • Virginia 1863

Indian Wars Little Big Horn

  • Bannocks

Arizona 1866 Wyoming 1874

War with Spain

  • Manila

China Relief Expedition

  • Yang-tsun
  • Peking

Philippine–American War

  • Manila
  • Laguna de Bay
  • Zapote River
  • Cavite
  • Luzon 1899

World War II

  • Rhineland
  • Central Europe

Korean War

  • UN Summer-Fall Offensive
  • Second Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer-Fall 1952
  • Third Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer 1953

Vietnam

  • Counteroffensive, Phase VII
  • Consolidation I
  • Consolidation II
  • Cease-Fire

Decorations

  • Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered MUNSAN-NI

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Center of Military History document "14th Infantry Lineage and Honors". This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Center of Military History document "1bn, 14th Infantry Lineage and Honors". This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Center of Military History document "2bn, 14th Infantry Lineage and Honors".

  1. ^ a b "Special Unit Designations". United States Army Center of Military History. 21 April 2010. Archived from the original on 9 June 2010. Retrieved 24 June 2010. 
  2. ^ "Medal of Honor Recipients - Korean War". United States Army Center of Military History. 27 January 2009. Archived from the original on 10 March 2009. Retrieved 2 March 2009. 
  3. ^ Moore, Robin (2004). Hunting Down Saddam: The Inside Story of the Search and Capture. St. Martin's Press. pp. 13–53. Retrieved 6 November 2009. 
  4. ^ "Special Forces to Expand". The Salute (U.S. Army). Fall 2009. pp. 1–2. 
  5. ^ http://www.1-14th.com/Iraq/Archives/2009_Iraq_Report.html

External links[edit]