156 Xanthippe

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156 Xanthippe
Designations
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1][1]
Epoch August 27, 2011 (JD 2455800.5)
Aphelion 500.365 Gm (3.345 AU)
Perihelion 315.932 Gm (2.112 AU)
408.149 Gm (2.728 AU)
Eccentricity 0.226
1646.030 d (4.51 a)
17.80 km/s
228.962°
Inclination 9.775°
241.861°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 116.34 ± 4.14[2] km
Mass (6.49 ± 3.71) × 1018[2] kg
Mean density
7.86 ± 4.57[2] g/cm3
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0338 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0640 km/s
0.0687 ± 0.0152[3]
Temperature ~168 K
C[3] (Tholen)
8.310[3]

156 Xanthippe is a large, dark main-belt asteroid that was discovered by Austrian astronomer J. Palisa on November 22, 1875. It is named after Xanthippe, the wife of the Greek philosopher Socrates.

Photometric observations of this asteroid at the European Southern Observatory in La Silla, Chile during 1981 gave a light curve with a period of 22.5 hours.[4] Based upon its spectrum this is classified as a C-type asteroid,[3] indicating that it likely has a carbonaceous composition. The estimated size of this object is 116 km.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yeomans, Donald K., "156 Xanthippe", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-03-30. 
  2. ^ a b c d Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98-118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b c d Pravec, P. et al. (May 2012), "Absolute Magnitudes of Asteroids and a Revision of Asteroid Albedo Estimates from WISE Thermal Observations", Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2012, Proceedings of the conference held May 16-20, 2012 in Niigata, Japan (1667), Bibcode:2012LPICo1667.6089P.  See Table 4.
  4. ^ Debehogne, H. et al. (April 1982), "Photoelectric photometry of three dark asteroids", Astronomy and Astrophysics 108 (1): 197–200, Bibcode:1982A&A...108..197D.