16th Photographic Squadron

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16th Photographic Squadron
Active 1942-1944; 1947
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Winston P. Wilson
Insignia
16th Photographic Squadron emblem[1] 16th Photographic Squadron - Emblem.png

The 16th Photographic Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 55th Reconnaissance Group at MacDill Field, Florida, where it was inactivated on 16 December 1947.

History[edit]

During World War II, the squadron was engaged in photographic mapping of areas of the United States.

The squadron was reactivated at MacDill Field, Florida in June 1947 as part of Strategic Air Command's 55th Reconnaissance Group during 1947, was engaged in SAC's strategic mapping mission.[1] The squadron was inactivated in December and its personnel and equipment were transferred to the 16th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Special), which was simultaneously activated.

Lineage[edit]

  • Constituted as the Photographic Laboratory Unit on 27 March 1942
  • Activated on 31 March 1942
  • Redesignated 16th Photographic Squadron on 8 July 1942
  • Redesignated 16th Photographic Unit on 1 February 1943
  • Redesignated 16th Domestic Photographic Unit on 11 August 1943
  • Redesignated 16th Photographic Squadron on 14 September 1944
  • Inactivated on 16 December 1947[1]

Assignments[edit]

Stations[edit]

  • Bolling Field, District of Columbia, 31 March 1942
  • Buckley Field, Colorado, 1 November 1944
  • MacDill Field, Florida, 19 April 1946 - 16 December 1947[1]

Aircraft[edit]

Service Streamer[edit]

Campaign Streamer Campaign Dates Notes
World War II - American Campaign Streamer (Plain).png American Theater without inscription 31 March 1942 – 2 March 1946 [1]

Emblem[edit]

Approved on 29 March 1943 the squadron's emblem depicts a white caricatured bear, grasping a black aerial camera proper in the forepaws, leaning and diving through space on a wing section formed by two red planks, and having a tail rudder of the same material, all emitting white speed lines and mounted on a light blue disc.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 90. ISBN 0-405-12194-6. LCCN 70605402. OCLC 72556. 

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

External links[edit]