170s BC

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 3rd century BC2nd century BC1st century BC
Decades: 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC170s BC160s BC 150s BC 140s BC
Years: 179 BC 178 BC 177 BC 176 BC 175 BC 174 BC 173 BC 172 BC 171 BC 170 BC
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

170s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 179 BC 178 BC 177 BC 176 BC 175 BC 174 BC 173 BC 172 BC 171 BC 170 BC

179 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Greece[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

178 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • One of Perseus' first acts on becoming king of Macedonia is to renew the treaty between Macedonia and Rome. In the mean time, Perseus builds up the Macedonian army and puts out feelers for creating an alliance with the Greek leagues, with his northern barbarian neighbours, and also with the Seleucid king Seleucus IV.

177 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • After two military campaigns, the Romans finally subdue the Illyrian tribe of the Histri.
  • Luni in northern Italy is founded by the Romans with the name Luna at the mouth of the Magra River.

176 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Parthia[edit]

175 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • King Seleucus IV of Syria arranges for the exchange of his brother Antiochus for Demetrius, the son of Seleucus IV, who has been a hostage in Rome following the Treaty of Apamea in 188 BC. However, Seleucus IV is assassinated by his chief minister Heliodorus who then seizes the Syrian throne.
  • Antiochus manages to oust Heliodorus and takes advantage of Demetrius' captivity in Rome to seize the throne for himself under the name Antiochus IV Epiphanes.
  • During this period of uncertainty in Syria, the Egyptian ruler, Ptolemy VI, lays claim to Coele Syria, Palestine, and Phoenicia, which the Seleucid king Antiochus III has previously conquered. Both the Syrian and Egyptian parties appeal to Rome for help, but the Roman Senate refuses to take sides.
  • Timarchus is appointed governor of Media in western Persia by Antiochus IV to deal with the growing threat from the Parthians while Timarchus' brother, Heracleides, becomes minister of the royal finances.

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]

  • The construction of the western front of the altar in Pergamum, Turkey begins (approximate date) and is finished in 156 BC. A reconstruction of it is now kept at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Pergamonmuseum in Berlin.

174 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Mongolia[edit]

173 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

172 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • Since the reign of the Seleucid king, Antiochus III, the Jewish inhabitants of Judea enjoy extensive autonomy under their high priest. However, they are divided into two parties, the orthodox Hasideans (Pious Ones) and a reform party that favours Hellenism. Antiochus IV supports the reform party because of the financial support they provide him with. In return for a considerable payment, he has permitted the high priest, Jason, to build a gymnasium in Jerusalem and to introduce the Greek mode of educating young people. Jason's time as high priest is brought to an abrupt end when he sends Menelaus, the brother of Simon the Benjamite, to deliver money to Antiochus IV. Menelaus takes this opportunity to "outbid" Jason for the priesthood, resulting in Antiochus IV confirming Menelaus as the High Priest.

Carthage[edit]

  • The peace treaty at the end of the Second Punic War requires that all border disputes involving Carthage be arbitrated by the Roman Senate and requires Carthage to get explicit Roman approval before going to war. As a result, envoys from Carthage appear before the Roman Senate to request resolution of a boundary dispute with Numidia. The dispute is decided in Numidia's favour.

171 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Parthia[edit]

170 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • With the guardians of the young king Ptolemy VI Philometor demanding the return of Coele-Syria to Egyptian control, the Seleucid king, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, decides on a preemptive strike against Egypt and invades the country, conquering all but the city of Alexandria. He is also able to capture Ptolemy VI.
  • Antiochus IV decides to let Ptolemy VI continue as king of Egypt, but as his puppet. He does this to minimise any reaction from Rome towards his invasion. Antiochus IV then departs Egypt to deal with disturbances in Palestine, but he safeguards his access to Egypt with a strong garrison in Pelusium.
  • With Antiochus IV now absent from the country, the citizens of Alexandria choose Ptolemy VI's brother Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II as their king. The two Ptolemy brothers agree to rule Egypt jointly with their sister Cleopatra II and Coele Syria is invaded by the Egyptian forces.

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • The usurped high priest of Judea, Jason, does not abandon his claims to being the high priest which he has lost to Menelaus two years earlier. While Antiochus IV is waging war against Egypt, he succeeds in making himself master of Jerusalem once more and forces Menelaus to seek refuge in the citadel.

Bactria[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]