1717 Omani invasion of Bahrain

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1717 invasion of Bahrain
Date 1717
Location Bahrain Bahrain
Result Omani victory
  • Bahrain sold back to the Safavids
Belligerents
Oman Yaruba Oman

Al Bin Ali mercenaries[1]

Safavid Bahrain
Casualties and losses
Unknown Unknown
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History of Bahrain
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Ancient Bahrain
Historical region
Qarmatians
Portuguese occupation
Safavid hegemony (1602–1717)
  • 1717 Omani invasion of Bahrain
History of Bahrain (1783–1971)
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In 1717 the Sultanate of Oman invaded Bahrain bringing an end to a 115 year rulership by the eroding Safavid dynasty.[2] Following the Afghan invasion of Iran at the beginning of the eighteenth century which weakened the stronghold of the Safavids, the Omani forces were able to undermine Bahrain and culminated in victory for the Akhbari.

Bahraini theologian, Sheikh Yusuf Al Bahrani, provides his personal account of the invasion in his biographical dictionary of Shia scholars, Lu’lu’at al-Baḥrayn (The Pearl of Bahrain):

However, when the Omanis relinquished control it did not bring peace to Bahrain; the political weakness of Persia meant that the islands were soon invaded by Huwala, who Al Bahrani says 'ruined' Bahrain.[4] Almost constant warfare between various Sunni bedouin tribes, the Kharajite Omanis and then the Persians under Nadir Shah and Karim Khan Zand laid waste to much of Bahrain, while the high taxes imposed by the Omanis drove out both the ulema-pearl merchants and the pearl divers – German Arabist Carsten Niebuhr found in 1763 that Bahrain's 360 towns and villages had through warfare and economic distress been reduced to only 60.[5]

Later from 1783 Bahrain would be ruled by a succession of sheikhs from the House of Al-Khalifa which rule to this day.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ^ محمد خليل المرعشي , مجمع التواريخ , تحقيق عباس اقبال, طهران , 1328هـ - 1949م , ص 37-39
  2. ^ cdlib.org Retrieved February 10, 2008
  3. ^ The Autobiography of Yūsuf al-Bahrānī (1696–1772) from Lu’lu’at al-Baḥrayn, from the final chapter An Account of the Life of the Author and the Events That Have Befallen Him featured in Interpreting the Self, Autobiography in the Arabic Literary Tradition, Edited by Dwight F. Reynolds, University of California Press Berkeley 2001 pp219-220
  4. ^ The Autobiography of Yūsuf al-Bahrānī (1696–1772) from Lu’lu’at al-Baḥrayn, from the final chapter An Account of the Life of the Author and the Events That Have Befallen Him featured in Interpreting the Self, Autobiography in the Arabic Literary Tradition, Edited by Dwight F. Reynolds, University of California Press Berkeley 2001 p221
  5. ^ Juan Cole, Sacred Space and Holy War, IB Tauris, 2007 p52