174567 Varda

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Varda
Discovery[2]
Discovered by J. A. Larsen[1]
Discovery date June 21, 2003
Designations
MPC designation (174567) Varda
2003 MW12
Minor planet category TNO (cubewano)[3]
SCATEXTD[4]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 52.284 AU
(7822 million km)
Perihelion 39.622 AU
(5927 million km)
45.953 AU
(6874 million km)
Eccentricity 0.138
113779.342 d (311.51 a)
4.37 km/s
257.434°
Inclination 21.494°
184.009°
181.811°
Known satellites 1
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 705+81
−75
 km
[5]
Mass (2.65±0.03)×1020 kg[5][a]
Mean density
1.25+0.40
−0.43
 g/cm3
[5][a]
5.9 h[2]
Albedo 0.102+0.024
−0.024
Temperature ≈ 41 K
20.5[6]
3.61±0.05[5]
3.4[2]

174567 Varda /ˈvɑrdə/ (Quenya: [ˈvarda]), provisional designation 2003 MW12, is a trans-Neptunian object with an absolute magnitude of 3.5.[2] It is highly likely to be a dwarf planet.[7] It was discovered on June 21, 2003 by Jeffrey A. Larsen with the Spacewatch telescope.[8]

It is currently 47.5 AU from the Sun,[6] and will come to perihelion around November 2096.[4][9] It has been observed 68 times over 14 oppositions with precovery images back to 1980.[2]

Satellite[edit]

A satellite, Ilmarë /ˈɪlmər/ (stress on the first syllable, Quenya: [ˈilmarɛ]), or Varda I, was discovered in an image obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope on 26 April 2009, and reported in 2011. It is estimated to be 361+42
−38
 km
in diameter (about 50% that of its primary).[5]

Name[edit]

Names for Varda and its moon were announced on 16 January 2014. Varda is a queen of the Valar, creator of the stars, and principal goddess of the elves in J.R.R. Tolkien's fictional mythology. Ilmarë is a chief of the Maiar and Varda's handmaiden.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Assuming Varda and Ilmarë have equal albedos and equal densities

References[edit]

  1. ^ List Of Transneptunian Objects
  2. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 174567 (2003 MW12)". 2007-06-14 last obs. Retrieved 2008-12-08. 
  3. ^ "MPEC 2009-P26 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 AUG. 17.0 TT)". Minor Planet Center. 2009-08-07. Retrieved 2009-08-24. 
  4. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (2008-04-15). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 174567". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-08-24. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region X. Analysis of classical Kuiper belt objects from Herschel and Spitzer observations (2014)
  6. ^ a b "AstDys (174567) 2003MW12 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Archived from the original on 2009-04-18. Retrieved 2009-03-22. 
  7. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2011-08-25. 
  8. ^ Larsen, Jeffrey A.; Roe, Eric S.; Albert, C. Elise et al. (2007). "The Search for Distant Objects in the Solar System Using Spacewatch". The Astronomical Journal 133 (4): 1247–1270. Bibcode:2007AJ....133.1247L. doi:10.1086/511155. 
  9. ^ "HORIZONS Web-Interface". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2009-08-24. 
  10. ^ M.P.C. 86285, 2014 Jan. 16, p. 431

External links[edit]