1799 in science

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The year 1799 in science and technology involved many significant events, listed below.

Archaeology[edit]

Astronomy[edit]

Biology[edit]

Exploration[edit]

Geology[edit]

History of science[edit]

  • Benjamin Hutchinson publishes Biographia Medica in London, the first English language historical dictionary of international medical biography.

Mathematics[edit]

Medicine[edit]

Metrology[edit]

  • An all-platinum kilogramme prototype is fabricated with the objective of equalling as closely as feasible the mass of one cubic decimetre of water at 4 °C. The prototype is presented to the Archives of the French Republic in June and on December 10 is formally ratified as the Kilogramme des Archives and the kilogramme defined as being equal to its mass. This standard holds for the next ninety years.

Mineralogy[edit]

  • Twelve-year-old Conrad John Reed finds what he described as a "heavy yellow rock" along Little Meadow Creek in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, and makes it a doorstop in his home. Conrad's father, John Reed, learns that the rock is actually gold in 1802, initiating the first gold rush in the United States.

Paleontology[edit]

Physics[edit]

Technology[edit]

Awards[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Contributions to Physical and Medical Knowledge, principally from the West of England p. 4.
  2. ^ "biology, n.". Oxford English Dictionary online version. Oxford University Press. September 2011. Retrieved 2011-11-01.  (subscription or UK public library membership required)
  3. ^ "Historical Background and Naming". Australian Platypus Conservancy. Retrieved 2011-04-16. 
  4. ^ a b Winchester, Simon (2001). The Map That Changed the World: William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology. New York: HarperCollins. ISBN 0-14-028039-1. 
  5. ^ Bogomolny, Alexander. "Simson Line: What is it?". Cut The Knot: Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles. Retrieved 2012-01-23. 
  6. ^ "Parry, Caleb Hillier". Whonamedit?. Retrieved 2011-02-27. 
  7. ^ "The 18th Century Women Scientists of Bologna". ScienceWeek. 2004. Retrieved 2011-04-26. 
  8. ^ Woodbury, Robert S. (1960). "The Legend of Eli Whitney and Interchangeable Parts". Technology and Culture 1.