1819 in New Zealand

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1819 in New Zealand
Decades:

Incumbents[edit]

Regal and viceregal[edit]

Events[edit]

  • January – Hongi Hika returns from his expedition to East Cape and the Bay of Plenty (see 1818) with 2000 prisoners.[1]
  • 5 May[2]Samuel Leigh arrives on the Active to recuperate from ill-health at Reverend Samuel Marsden's invitation.[3][4]
  • 17 June[2][5] – Samuel Leigh returns to New South Wales. While in New Zealand he has conceived the idea of establishing a Wesleyan mission to the Māori. He returns to England before the end of the year with this proposition in mind. His report to Reverend Marsden leads to the appointment of John Gare Butler to head the second Church Missionary Society mission.[3][4]
  • 24 July – Governor Macquarie appoints Reverend Butler Justice of the Peace for New Zealand.[6]
  • 12 August – Reverend Samuel Marsden arrives in New Zealand on the General Gates on his second visit accompanied by Reverend Butler and James Kemp and their families. Marsden accepts the offer of land at Kerikeri from Hongi Hika to start the second Church Missionary Society mission. Reverend Butler will be in charge. He is the first resident ordained clergyman in New Zealand.[6][7]
  • 25 September – Samuel Marsden plants the first grape vines in New Zealand.[8][9]
  • 9 November – Reverend Marsden leaves at the end of his second visit.[7]
  • 20[6] or 21 December[10] – The Butlers and Kemps take up residence in Kerikeri.
Undated
  • Te Rauparaha joins a Ngāpuhi attack on Ngāti Maru in Taranaki. The Ngāpuhi have enough muskets to soon win several battles (the Ngāti Maru have never seen muskets before) and capture a number of pa before continuing on to Cook Strait. When they pass through Kawhia on their return the Ngāpuhi give the Ngāti Toa some muskets. Later in the year Ngāti Toa (possibly led by Te Rauparaha) return to the Cook Strait region looking for a new place to settle as they are under severe pressure from Waikato and Ngāti Maniapoto at Kawhia.[11]

Births[edit]

Undated
Approximate

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ New Zealand Encyclopaedia 1966: Hongi Hika Biography
  2. ^ a b Early European Visits to NZ
  3. ^ a b Chambers, W. A. "Leigh, Samuel 1785–1852". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 5 April 2011. 
  4. ^ a b New Zealand Encyclopaedia 1966: Samuel Leigh Biography
  5. ^ The New Zealand Encyclopaedia 1966: Samuel Leigh Biography states that Leigh stayed for nine months, but this cannot be correct as he was married in England on 14 December.
  6. ^ a b c New Zealand Encyclopaedia 1966: John Gare Butler Biography
  7. ^ a b Parsonson, G. S. "Marsden, Samuel 1765–1838". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 5 April 2011. 
  8. ^ Culinary Journeys
  9. ^ NZHistory: The Christian Missionaries
  10. ^ Wises New Zealand Guide, 7th Edition, 1979. p.185.
  11. ^ Oliver, Steven. "Te Rauparaha ?–1849". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 5 April 2011. 
  12. ^ Bohan, Edward (1994), Edward Stafford, New Zealand's first statesman, Christchurch, New Zealand: Hazard Press, ISBN 0-908790-67-8
  13. ^ rulers.org
  14. ^ Esplin, Thomas (18 September 2007). "'GULLY, John', from An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, originally published in 1966.". Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  15. ^ Hall, D.O.W. (18 September 2007). "'MACANDREW, James'". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, originally published in 1966. Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  16. ^ Stokes, Evelyn. "Völkner, Carl Sylvius: 1819–1865". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 5 April 2011. 
  17. ^ Foster, B.J. (18 September 2007). "TRAVERS, William Thomas Locke". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, originally published in 1966. Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand.