1820

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 18th century19th century20th century
Decades: 1790s  1800s  1810s  – 1820s –  1830s  1840s  1850s
Years: 1817 1818 181918201821 1822 1823
1820 in topic:
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1820 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1820
MDCCCXX
Ab urbe condita 2573
Armenian calendar 1269
ԹՎ ՌՄԿԹ
Assyrian calendar 6570
Bahá'í calendar −24 – −23
Bengali calendar 1227
Berber calendar 2770
British Regnal year 60 Geo. 3 – 1 Geo. 4
Buddhist calendar 2364
Burmese calendar 1182
Byzantine calendar 7328–7329
Chinese calendar 己卯(Earth Rabbit)
4516 or 4456
    — to —
庚辰年 (Metal Dragon)
4517 or 4457
Coptic calendar 1536–1537
Discordian calendar 2986
Ethiopian calendar 1812–1813
Hebrew calendar 5580–5581
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1876–1877
 - Shaka Samvat 1742–1743
 - Kali Yuga 4921–4922
Holocene calendar 11820
Igbo calendar 820–821
Iranian calendar 1198–1199
Islamic calendar 1235–1236
Japanese calendar Bunsei 3
(文政3年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4153
Minguo calendar 92 before ROC
民前92年
Thai solar calendar 2363


Year 1820 (MDCCCXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

January–March[edit]

April–June[edit]

July–September[edit]

October–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

Births[edit]

January–June[edit]

July–December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January–June[edit]

July–December[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jones, A. G. E. (1982). Antarctica Observed: who discovered the Antarctic Continent?. Caedmon of Whitby. ISBN 0-905355-25-3. 
  2. ^ Drewry, Charles Stewart (1832). "Section III". A Memoir of Suspension Bridges: Comprising The History Of Their Origin And Progress. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green & Longman. pp. 37–41. Retrieved 2011-08-16.