1845 to 1868 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the years 1845 to 1868 throughout the world.

Events[edit]

Champions[edit]

The baseball team "Champions of America", 1865

Season records[edit]

At its December 1868 annual meeting, the National Association of Base Ball Players (NABBP) permitted professional clubs. Twelve existing members did "go pro" and constitute the professional field for 1869.

1868 records of major clubs[edit]

Marshall Wright publishes 1868 season records for 98 teams, many of them incomplete ("(inc)" in the table). Bill Ryczek calls 15 of that season's teams "major" (not marked). This table covers all of those "majors" (not marked), all of the 1869 "pros" (*), all 14 member clubs with at least twelve wins on record, and a few others. For the seven listed clubs in Greater New York, no city is named in the first column; the comment gives their locales.

Club, City W L T comment
Atlantic 47 7 * Brooklyn
Athletic, Philadelphia 47 3 *
Union 37 6 (inc) Morrisania, NY
Cincinnati "Red Stockings" 36 7 *
Mutual 31 10 * New York
Eckford 23 12 * Brooklyn
Buckeye, Cincinnati 21 5 (inc)
Union, Lansingburgh 15 5 * the "Troy Haymakers"
Champion 14 7 Jersey City, NJ
Harvard, Cambridge 14 2 the college team
National, Albany 13 8
Olympic, Washington 12 11 1 *
Tri-Mountain, Boston 12 9 (inc)
Maryland, Baltimore 12 6 *
Forest City, Cleveland 11 11 1 *
Lowell, Boston 11 9
Forest City, Rockford 11 4
Star 9 10 Brooklyn
Excelsior, Chicago 7 8 1 (inc)
National, Washington 7 3 *
Keystone, Philadelphia 5 10 1 (inc) *
Irvington 2 6 (inc) * Irvington, NJ

At least four Association clubs not listed here would someday try professionalism: Riverside of Portsmouth, Ohio (1870); Kekionga of Fort Wayne, Indiana (1871); Middletown of Mansfield, Connecticut (1872); Resolute of Elizabeth, New Jersey (1873).

Meanwhile only two brand new professional baseball clubs would be established in the next three years, the Chicago White Stockings for 1870 and the Boston Red Stockings for 1871. Their commercial origins may be related to their survival alone by 1877, and on to 2010, while all of their rivals with older and amateur roots fell away.

1867 records of major clubs[edit]

Marshall Wright publishes 1867 season records for 89 teams, many of them incomplete ("(inc)" in the table). Bill Ryczek calls 17 of that season's teams "major" (not marked). This table covers all of those "majors", all 13 member clubs with at least fourteen wins on record, and a few others. For the nine listed clubs in Greater New York, no city is named in the first column; the comment gives their locales.

Club, City W L T comment
Athletic, Philadelphia 44 3 *
National, Washington 29 7 *
Quaker City, Philadelphia 28 9 maybe a one-season club
Mutual 23 6 1 * New York
Keystone, Philadelphia 21 6 1 *
Union 21 8 Morrisania, NY
Atlantic 19 5 1 * Brooklyn
Geary, Philadelphia 19 6
Tri-Mountain, Boston 19 3
Cincinnati "Red Stockings" 17 1 *
Irvington 16 7 * Irvington, NJ
Oriental 15 3 Greenpoint, NY
Union, Lansingburgh 14 7 * the "Troy Haymakers"
Excelsior 11 5 Brooklyn
Olympic, Washington 11 5 *
Harvard, Cambridge 11 2 the college team
Excelsior, Chicago 10 1
Lowell, Boston 8 5 (inc)
Buckeye, Cincinnati 7 8
Eckford 6 16 1 * Brooklyn
Star 6 4 (inc) Brooklyn
West Philadelphia, Phila. 5 12 (inc)
Eureka 3 8 (inc) Newark NJ

Star (*) marks ten clubs among twelve who would go pro in 1869. Excelsior of Chicago and Buckeye of Cincinnati are listed because they were probably the strongest teams in the west after the Cincinnati Red Stockings.

1866 records of major clubs[edit]

Marshall Wright publishes 1866 season records for 58 of 93 association members, said to be complete for games between two member clubs. Bill Ryczek calls 20 of that season's teams "major" including three old New York rivals of the Knickerbockers.

This table covers all of those "majors", all 14 members with at least eight wins on record, and a few others. For the fifteen listed clubs in Greater New York, no city is named in the first column; the comment gives their locales.

Club, City W L T comment
Union 25 3 Morrisania, NY
Athletic, Philadelphia 23 2 *
Atlantic 17 3 * Brooklyn
Excelsior 13 6 1 Brooklyn
Active 10 6 New York
National, Washington 10 5 *
Mutual 10 2 * New York
Eckford 9 8 * Brooklyn
Eureka 9 7 Newark, NJ
Enterprise 9 6 Brooklyn
Irvington 9 6 * Irvington, NJ
Mohawk 9 3 Brooklyn
Star 8 6 Brooklyn
Americus 8 5 Newark, NJ
Keystone, Philadelphia 5 5 1 *
Empire 4 7 New York
Gotham 4 4 New York
Eagle 2 9 New York
Camden, Camden 2 5 Camden, NJ
Lowell, Boston 2 0
Harvard, Cambridge 1 5 the college team
Union, Lansingburgh * non-member; now in Troy, NY

Star (*) marks eight clubs among twelve who would go pro in 1869, three seasons later.

1865 and earlier clubs[edit]

For the preceding 1865 season Marshall Wright lists 30 members with supposedly complete records for most of them. Twenty-two of the thirty were in Greater New York. Bill Ryczek calls 19 teams "major" in the first season that he covers: sixteen of the members and three others (Lowell, Harvard, and Camden).

No one traveled much and membership was still depressed by the Civil War. There had been 59 delegates at the March 1860 annual meeting, and 55 at the next annual meeting that December (on a new baseball calendar), who thereby intended to play during the 1861 season that the war curtailed. Nine of 59 and eleven of 55 were from outside Greater New York.[7]

Births[edit]

1840s[edit]

1850s[edit]

  • 1850
Date of birth missing
  • 1853
  • 1856
  • 1857
Date of birth missing
  • 1858
Date of birth missing

1860–1868[edit]

  • 1868
  • Date of birth missing
Jim Adams
Frank Knauss
Sparrow McCaffrey
Ambrose McGann
Ed Pabst
Jim Powers
Kid Summers
Fred Truax

Deaths[edit]

1860s[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Baseball History: 19th Century Baseball: The Game". Retrieved October 15, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Knickerbocker Baseball Rules". Retrieved October 11, 2009. 
  3. ^ O’Reilly, Charles (May 24, 2005). "Birthplace of Baseball Monument, Hoboken, N.J.". Retrieved July 4, 2009. 
  4. ^ All Star Games of 1858 http://baseballhistoryblog.com/2725/all-star-games-of-1858 Accessed August 5, 2013
  5. ^ "Cool Quiz! Trivia, Quizzes, Puzzles, Jokes, Useless Knowledge, FUN!: On The Way To Today... July 1st". Retrieved October 15, 2009. 
  6. ^ Franks, Joel (2001). Whose baseball?: the national pastime and cultural diversity in California, 1859–1941. Scarecrow Press. p. 31. ISBN 978-0-8108-3927-4. 
  7. ^ Wright, 41–63.
  • Orem, Preston D. (1961). Baseball (1845–1881) From the Newspaper Accounts. Altadena, California: Self-published.
  • Ryczek, William J. (1998). When Johnny Came Sliding Home: The Post-Civil War Baseball Boom, 1865–1870. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co. ISBN 0-7864-0514-7.
  • Wright, Marshall D. (2000). The National Association of Base Ball Players, 1857–1870. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co. ISBN 0-7864-0779-4.

External links[edit]