1878 English cricket season

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The 1878 English cricket season is remembered for the first official tour by an Australian team, although it played no Test Matches; and for the match that inspired a famous poem.

Champion County[a][edit]

Playing record (by county)[1][edit]

County Played Won Lost Drawn
Derbyshire 10 3 6 1
Gloucestershire 10 4 2 4
Hampshire 4 0 3 1
Kent 12 6 4 2
Lancashire 10 5 3 2
Middlesex 6 3 0 3
Nottinghamshire 14 7 3 4
Surrey 12 3 6 3
Sussex 8 1 7 0
Yorkshire 14 7 5 2

Leading batsmen (qualification 20 innings)[edit]

1878 English season leading batsmen[2]
Name Team Matches Innings Not outs Runs Highest score Average 100s 50s
John Selby Nottinghamshire 21 31 1 938 107 31.26 1 8
Edward Lyttelton Cambridge University
Middlesex
MCC
16 26 0 779 113 29.96 1 3
WG Grace Gloucestershire
MCC
24 42 2 1151 116 28.77 1 5
Frank Penn Kent
MCC
12 20 1 534 160 28.10 1 3
George Ulyett Yorkshire 28 51 4 1270 109 27.02 1 9

Leading bowlers (qualification 1,000 balls)[edit]

1878 English season leading bowlers[3]
Name Team Balls bowled Runs conceded Wickets taken Average Best bowling 5 wickets
in innings
10 wickets
in match
Arnold Rylott MCC 1944 451 53 8.50 8/15 6 3
Allan Steel Cambridge University
Lancashire
4493 1547 164 9.43 9/63 19 9
Harry Boyle Australians 1443 483 51 9.47 7/48 4 0
Tom Garrett Australians 1042 318 32 9.93 7/38 2 1
William Mycroft Derbyshire
MCC
4185 1196 116 10.31 8/36 11 5

Notable events[edit]

  • Australia made the inaugural first-class tour of England by an overseas team.
  • 25 – 27 July: Lancashire versus Gloucestershire at Old Trafford. This was the first time Gloucestershire visited Old Trafford and it caused ground records to be established. The match was drawn after rain interruptions. It has a special place because it ultimately formed the nostalgic inspiration for the famous poem At Lord's by Francis Thompson. In the second innings, the famed "run-stealers" Monkey Hornby and Dick Barlow shared an opening stand of 108, with Hornby going on to score 100. He also became involved in a ferocious argument with WG when a contentious "run-out" was claimed after the batsmen had stopped running because the ball had crossed the boundary. The run-out was finally overruled after WG even went so far as to ask the (Lancashire home) crowd if it had been a four after all. He knew all along that a four had been scored.
  • 4 July: Allan Steel becomes the first bowler[4] to take 100 wickets[5] in his first full season of first-class cricket. He played one match in 1877.
  • 31 July: Official formation of Northants CCC at a meeting in the George Hotel, Kettering.
  • Alfred Shaw and Fred Morley bowl unchanged through five matches during the season. No other pair has ever managed more than three.[6]
  • Shaw becomes the second bowler after James Southerton in 1870 to top 200 wickets in a season.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

a An unofficial seasonal title sometimes proclaimed by consensus of media and historians prior to December 1889 when the official County Championship was constituted. Although there are ante-dated claims prior to 1873, when residence qualifications were introduced, it is only since that ruling that any quasi-official status can be ascribed.
b Middlesex, Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire were all seen as having some claims to the "Championship", but the general consensus was that none of these teams could claim superiority

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wynne-Thomas, Peter; The Rigby A-Z of Cricket Records; p. 53 ISBN 072701868X
  2. ^ First Class Batting in England in 1878
  3. ^ First Class Bowling in England in 1878
  4. ^ Webber, Roy; The Playfair Book of Cricket Records; p. 177. Published 1951 by Playfair Books.
  5. ^ Gentlemen v Players at the Oval in 1878
  6. ^ Frindall, Bill (editor); The Wisden Book of Cricket Records (Fourth edition); pp. 285-289. ISBN 0747222037

Annual reviews[edit]

  • John Lillywhite's Cricketer's Companion (Green Lilly), Lillywhite, 1879
  • James Lillywhite's Cricketers’ Annual (Red Lilly), Lillywhite, 1879
  • John Wisden's Cricketers' Almanack 1879

External links[edit]