1887 English cricket season

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The 1887 English cricket season saw Surrey established as the leading county for the first time in over twenty years,[1] a place they would retain until 1892.

Champion County[a][edit]

Playing record (by county)[1][edit]

County Played Won Lost Drawn Points[b]
Derbyshire 6 0 6 0 0.0
Gloucestershire 14 1 9 4 3.0
Kent 14 1 8 5 3.5
Lancashire 14 10 3 1 10.5
Middlesex 10 4 2 4 6.0
Nottinghamshire 14 8 3 3 9.5
Surrey 16 12 2 2 13.0
Sussex 12 2 8 2 3.0
Yorkshire 16 6 3 7 9.5

Leading batsmen (qualification 20 innings)[edit]

1887 English season leading batsmen[2]
Name Team Matches Innings Not outs Runs Highest score Average 100s 50s
Arthur Shrewsbury Nottinghamshire 17 23 6 1653 267 78.71 8 5
WG Grace Gloucestershire
MCC
24 46 8 2062 183 not out 54.26 6 8
Alexander Webbe Middlesex
MCC
18 31 5 1244 243 not out 47.84 3 3
Walter Read Surrey 23 36 2 1615 247 47.50 5 5
Kingsmill Key Oxford University
Surrey
24 44 5 1684 281 43.17 2 10

Leading bowlers (qualification 1,000 balls)[edit]

1887 English season leading bowlers[3]
Name Team Balls bowled Runs conceded Wickets taken Average Best bowling 5 wickets
in innings
10 wickets
in match
Henry Richardson Nottinghamshire 2322 613 45 13.62 6/58 3 0
William Attewell Nottinghamshire 5361 1238 89 13.91 6/24 6 1
Alec Watson Lancashire 6130 1482 100 14.82 7/20 9 3
John Rawlin MCC 2152 675 45 15.00 7/47 3 1
George Lohmann Surrey 6526 2404 154 15.61 8/36 16 6

Notable events[edit]

The driest English cricket season since 1870,[4] combined with improvements to pitches from the heavy roller, allowed for a large number of notable batting feats:

  1. Five batsmen with twenty or more innings averaged over 40. Before 1887, no more than two had ever done so in one season.[5]
  2. W.G. Grace for the third time reached 2,000 runs; an aggregate not reached by any other batsman until 1893.
  3. Arthur Shrewsbury averaged 78.71 for twenty-three innings, beating W.G. Grace’s 1871 record of 78.25. This was not beaten until Robert Poore averaged 91.23 in 1899.
  4. Shrewsbury’s innings of 267 against Middlesex, at 615 minutes,[6] remains the longest innings ever played in a county match.
  5. Walter Read became the first batsman to play two consecutive innings of over 200,[7] scoring 247 against Lancashire[8] and 244 against Cambridge University[9]
  • For the last time until 1970,[10] no bowler took nine wickets in an innings, with the best analysis being eight for 26 by Dick Barlow.
  • As a result of some extremely bad results (only three wins and twenty-nine losses from thirty-five games) and financial trouble, Derbyshire were demoted from first-class status at the end of the season, not to return until 1895.
  • An unofficial points system of one point for a win and half a point for a draw[1] was devised by the "Cricket Reporting Agency" as a replacement for the former method of fewest matches lost to decide the "Champion County". Along with a more rigid schedule, it became the ancestor of the official County Championship from 1890 onwards.

Notes[edit]

a An unofficial seasonal title sometimes proclaimed by consensus of media and historians prior to December 1889 when the official County Championship was constituted. Although there are ante-dated claims prior to 1873, when residence qualifications were introduced, it is only since that ruling that any quasi-official status can be ascribed.
b The 1887 season saw an unofficial point system of 1 point for a win and 0.5 points for a draw devised by the "Cricket Reporting Agency"

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Wynne-Thomas, Peter; The Rigby A-Z of Cricket Records; p. 54 ISBN 072701868X
  2. ^ First Class Batting in England in 1887
  3. ^ First Class Bowling in England in 1887
  4. ^ Hadley Centre England and Wales Precipitation
  5. ^ Wynne-Thomas; The Rigby A-Z of Cricket Records; pp. 17-20
  6. ^ Nottinghamshire v Middlesex in 1887
  7. ^ Webber, Roy; The Playfair Book of Cricket Records; p. 43. Published 1951 by Playfair Books.
  8. ^ Lancashire v Surrey in 1887
  9. ^ Surrey v Cambridge University in 1887
  10. ^ Preston, Norman (editor); Wisden, 108th Edition (1971); p. 278

Annual reviews[edit]

External links[edit]