1888 Democratic National Convention

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1888 Democratic National Convention
1888 Presidential Election
StephenGroverCleveland.png AllenGThurman.png
Nominees
Cleveland and Thurman
Convention
Date(s) June 5-June 7, 1888
City St. Louis, Missouri
Venue Exposition Building
Candidates
Presidential nominee Grover Cleveland of New York
Vice Presidential nominee Allen G. Thurman of Ohio
1884  ·  1892

The 1888 Democratic National Convention was a nominating convention held June 5 to 7, 1888, in the St. Louis Exposition and Music Hall in St. Louis, Missouri.

St. Louis won the convention after a presentation in February 1888.

The Convention[edit]

Stephen M. White served as temporary chairman and Patrick A. Collins served as the convention's permanent president. [1]

Presidential Candidates[edit]

The Democratic National Convention held in St. Louis, Missouri on June 5-7, 1888, was harmonious. Incumbent President Cleveland was renominated unanimously without a formal ballot. This was the first time an incumbent Democratic president had been renominated since Martin Van Buren in 1840.

Vice Presidential Candidates[edit]

Cleveland/Thurman campaign poster

After Cleveland was renominated, Democrats had to choose a replacement for Thomas A. Hendricks. Hendricks ran unsuccessfully as the Democratic nominee for vice-president in 1876, but won the office when he ran again with Cleveland in 1884. Hendricks served as vice-president for only eight months before he died in office on November 25, 1885. Former Senator Allen G. Thurman of Ohio was nominated for vice-president over Isaac P. Gray, his nearest rival, and John C. Black, who trailed behind. Gray lost the nomination to Thurman primarily because his enemies brought up his actions while a Republican.[2]

Vice Presidential Ballot
1st Acclamation
Allen G. Thurman 684 822
Isaac P. Gray 101
John C. Black 36
Blank 1

The Democratic platform largely confined itself to a defense of the Cleveland administration, supporting reduction in the tariff and taxes generally as well as statehood for the western territories.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Our Presidents and How We Make Them by Alexander K. McClure Ayer Co Pub (February 1988) ISBN 0-8369-5532-3
  2. ^ Jacob Piatt Dunn, George William Harrison Kemper, Indiana and Indianans (p. 724).

External links[edit]


Preceded by
1884
Democratic National Conventions Succeeded by
1892