1908 in aviation

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Years: 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1908:

Events[edit]

January–March[edit]

April–June[edit]

July–September[edit]

  • The Royal Navy '​s Director of Naval Ordnance, Captain Reginald Bacon, recommends that the Royal Navy acquire an airship to compete with the Imperial German Navy '​s Zeppelins.
  • 4 July – Glenn H. Curtiss is awarded the Scientific American trophy for being the first person in the United States to make a public flight of over 1 km (0.62 mi) in the AEA June Bug.[8] The award is for a flight at Hammondsport in which he flies 1,550 m (5,090 ft) in 1 minute and 42 seconds.
  • 8 July – Thérèse Peltier officially becomes the first woman to fly in an aeroplane. She is a passenger on a flight made by Léon Delagrange at Turin. However, this flight may not have been fully controlled.[9] See also #May and #October.
  • 8 August – Wilbur Wright makes his first flights at the Hunaudières racetrack at Le Mans, France. The Wright Flyer used for this and later flights had been shipped to Le Havre by Orville the previous year. It had been seriously damaged by custom officials when it arrived in France and was uncrated. Wilbur spent the whole summer of 1908 rebuilding the machine and getting it into flying condition. Wilbur's flights in this machine will have a profound effect on European aviation during the following months.
  • 20 August – Robert Gastambide becomes the first passenger carried by a monoplane when he is taken up on the Antoinette II.[10]
  • 21 August
    • Wilbur Wright moves to Camp d'Auvours, 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) east of Le Mans, where all his flights for the remainder of the year will be based.[11]
    • The Antoinette II flies the first circle by a monoplane.[10]
  • 3 September – Seeking a contract to build the United States Army '​s first airplane, Orville Wright begins flight trials before Army observers at Fort Myer, Virginia, in a new Wright Model A flyer. The flight lasts 1 minute 11 seconds.[12]
  • 9 September – At Fort Myer, Orville Wright sets three world records: a flight endurance record of 57 minutes 13 seconds on his first flight, a new flight endurance record of 1 hour 2 minutes and 15 seconds on his second flight 9the world '​s first airplane flight of over one hour), and an endurance record for a flight with a passenger (Army Lieutenant Frank P. Lahm) of 6 minutes 24 seconds on his third flight.[12]
  • 10 September – At Fort Myer, Orville Wright sets a world flight endurance record of 1 hour 5 minutes and 52 seconds.[12]
  • 11 September – At Fort Myer, Orville Wright sets a world flight endurance record of 1 hour 10 minutes and 24 seconds.[13]
  • 12 September – At Fort Myer, Orville Wright sets a world record for flight endurance with a passenger (Army Major George O. Squier) of 9 minutes 6⅓ seconds.[14]
  • 17 September – U.S. Army Lieutenant Thomas Selfridge becomes the first person killed in a powered aircraft crash and the first military aviation casualty when the Wright Model A Orville Wright is piloting during U.S. Army tests suffers a broken propeller crashes from an alatitude of 75 feet (23 meters) at Fort Myer. Wright is severely injured.[4][15]
  • Thérèse Peltier makes a flight of 200 metres (656 feet) at a height of approximately 2.5 meters (8 feet) at the Military Square in Turin, Italy. Photos of Peltier with the aeroplane are published on 27 September.[6] Unofficially, it is the first flight by a female aviator.
  • 28 September – At Camp d'Avours, France, Wilbur Wright sets a world airplane endurance record in a flight of 1 hour 32 minutes, covering 61 miles (98 km), winning a $1,000 prize from the Aero Club of France for the longest flight in history over an enclosed ground.[16]

October–December[edit]

  • 3 October – George P. Dicken of the New York Herald becomes the first newspaper reporter to fly in an airplane when he rides as a passenger with Wilbur Wright at Camp d '​Auvours.[17] The flight sets a world record for the longest with a passenger, lasting 55 minutes 37 seconds.[16]
  • 5 October – The Zeppelin LZ IV is destroyed by fire at Echterdingen, Germany.
  • 6 October – At Camp d '​Avours, Wilbur Wright sets another world record for a flight with a passenger, remaining aloft for 1 hour 4 minutes 26 seconds. He wins a $100,000 prize from a French syndicate for making two record-setting flights with a passenger within the same week.[16]
  • 7 October – Wilbur Wright flies with Mrs. Hart O. Berg[18] as passenger at Camp d '​Auvours.[11] This is the first fully controlled flight with a woman passenger.[9][18]
  • 16 October – Samuel Cody makes his first aeroplane flight in the UK in British Army Aeroplane No. 1.[19]
  • 18 October – Wilbur Wright climbs to 115 metres (377 ft) above Camp d'Auvours.[11]
  • 30 October – Henry Farman makes the first cross-country flight in a power-driven aeroplane, flying from Bouy to Reims 27 kilometres (17 mi) in 20 minutes.[20]
  • November – Horace, Eustace and Oswald Short found Short Brothers, the first aircraft manufacturing company in England, in Battersea, London.
  • 18 December
  • 24 December – The first Paris Aeronautical Salon opens the Grand Palais.[22]
  • 31 December – Wilbur Wright wins a prize of FF 20,000 from Michelin for the longest flight of the year (a world record) - 123.2 kilometres (76.6 mi) in 2 hours 18 minutes and 33 1/5 seconds from Camp d'Auvours.[11]

First flights[edit]

January–June[edit]

July–December[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chant, Chris, The World '​s Great Bombers, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 2000, ISBN 0-7607-2012-6, p. 48.
  2. ^ a b Daniel, Clifton, ed., Chronicle of the 20th Century, Mount Kisco, New York: Chronicle Publications, 1987, ISBN 0-942191-01-3, p. 108.
  3. ^ Daniel, Clifton, ed., Chronicle of the 20th Century, Mount Kisco, New York: Chronicle Publications, 1987, ISBN 0-942191-01-3, p. 110.
  4. ^ a b U.S. Centennial of Flight Commission: 1908 Kitty Hawk, N.C.
  5. ^ Daniel, Clifton, ed., Chronicle of the 20th Century, Mount Kisco, New York: Chronicle Publications, 1987, ISBN 0-942191-01-3, p. 111.
  6. ^ a b Early Aviators - Thérèse Peltier
  7. ^ The newspaper "Flandre Sportive" 1 June 1908 as referred to in " Een Eeuw Luchtvaart boven Gent" (Flying Pencil) by Piet Dhanens, pp 36-37, 2008
  8. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 107.
  9. ^ a b Early Aviators - Leon Delagrange
  10. ^ a b Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 52.
  11. ^ a b c d e U.S. Centennial of Flight Commission: 1908 Camp d'Auvours, Le Mans, France
  12. ^ a b c Crouch, Tom, The Bishop '​s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1989, p. 374.
  13. ^ Crouch, Tom, The Bishop '​s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1989, p. 374-375.
  14. ^ Crouch, Tom, The Bishop '​s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1989, p. 375.
  15. ^ Daniel, Clifton, ed., Chronicle of the 20th Century, Mount Kisco, New York: Chronicle Publications, 1987, ISBN 0-942191-01-3, p. 116.
  16. ^ a b c Daniel, Clifton, ed., Chronicle of the 20th Century, Mount Kisco, New York: Chronicle Publications, 1987, ISBN 0-942191-01-3, p. 117.
  17. ^ Crouch, Tom, The Bishop '​s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1989, p. 381.
  18. ^ a b Monash University - Aviation Biographies
  19. ^ Gibbs-Smith, C.H. Aviation. London: NMSO. p. 163. 
  20. ^ Gibbs-Smith, C.H. Aviation. London: NMSO. p. 162. 
  21. ^ Kenney, Kimberly, "A Thousand Miles By Airship", Aviation History, July 2012, p. 53.
  22. ^ The Paris Aeronautical SalonFlight 2 January 1909
  23. ^ "Selfridge Aerodrome Sails Steadily for 319 Feet. At 25 to 30 miles an Hour." Washington Post, 13 May 1908.