1910 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1910 throughout the world.

Champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

MLB statistical leaders[edit]

American League National League
AVG Nap Lajoie CLE .384 Sherry Magee PHI .331
HR Jake Stahl BOS 10 Fred Beck BSB &
Frank Schulte CHC
10
RBIs Sam Crawford DET 120 Sherry Magee PHI 123
Wins Jack Coombs PHA 31 Christy Mathewson NYG 27
ERA Ed Walsh CHW 1.27 King Cole CHC 1.80
Ks Walter Johnson WSH 313 Earl Moore PHI 185

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Athletics 102 48 0.680 57–19 45–29
New York Highlanders 88 63 0.583 14½ 49–25 39–38
Detroit Tigers 86 68 0.558 18 46–31 40–37
Boston Red Sox 81 72 0.529 22½ 51–28 30–44
Cleveland Naps 71 81 0.467 32 39–36 32–45
Chicago White Sox 68 85 0.444 35½ 41–37 27–48
Washington Senators 66 85 0.437 36½ 38–35 28–50
St. Louis Browns 47 107 0.305 57 26–51 21–56


National League final standings[edit]

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Chicago Cubs 104 50 0.675 58–19 46–31
New York Giants 91 63 0.591 13 52–26 39–37
Pittsburgh Pirates 86 67 0.562 17½ 46–30 40–37
Philadelphia Phillies 78 75 0.510 25½ 40–36 38–39
Cincinnati Reds 75 79 0.487 29 39–37 36–42
Brooklyn Superbas 64 90 0.416 40 39–39 25–51
St. Louis Cardinals 63 90 0.412 40½ 35–41 28–49
Boston Doves 53 100 0.346 50½ 29–48 24–52


Events[edit]

  • October 9 - Detroit Tigers star Ty Cobb stayed out of the lineup to preserve his .383 batting average. Cleveland Naps' Nap Lajoie went 8-for-8 in a doubleheader where six of his hits were bunt singles. He finished with a .384 batting average and rumor has it that the St. Louis Browns gave Lajoie the singles by playing too deep. American League president Ban Johnson investigated and found no wrongdoing.
  • November 10 - Clark Griffith becomes a club owner and president when he joins Philadelphia grain broker William Richardson in buying controlling interest in the Washington Senators for $175,000. Griffith, unable to get financial help from the American League, mortgages his ranch in Montana to raise funds.

Births[edit]

January–February[edit]

March–April[edit]

May–June[edit]

July–August[edit]

September–October[edit]

November–December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January–February[edit]

  • January 12 - Harry Staley, 43, National League pitcher who had four 20-win seasons from 1889 to 1892 for Pittsburgh and Boston teams.
  • January 22 - Sam Wise, 52, infielder, mainly for the 1880s Boston National League teams, who was shortstop of the 1883 champions and batted .334 in 1887.
  • January 29 - Marty Barrett, 49, catcher who played in 1884 for the Boston Beaneaters of the National League and the Indianapolis Hoosiers of the American Association.
  • January 31 - Pidgey Morgan, 56, OF/3B and pitcher for the St. Louis Red Stockings of the National Association (1875) and the Milwaukee Grays of the National League (1878).
  • February 8 - Flip Lafferty, 55, who pitched one game for the 1876 Philadelphia Athletics, and played four games in center field for the 1877 Louisville Grays.
  • February 8 - Cy Vorhees, 35, pitcher for the NL Philadelphia Phillies and AL Washington Senators in the season.
  • February 15 - Bug Holliday, 43, outfielder who hit .311 over parts of 10 seasons with the Cincinnati Red Stockings/Reds, who twice led all hitters in home runs (AA, 1889/NL, 1892) and also umpired for one season.
  • February 17 - Horatio Munn, 58, second baseman for the 1875 Brooklyn Atlantics of the National Association.

March–April[edit]

  • March 14 - Mike Hines, 47, catcher who played from 1883 to 1888 for the Boston Beaneaters, Brooklyn Grays and Providence Grays.
  • March 16 - Charlie Reipschlager, 54, American Association catcher who hit .222 in 296 games for the New York Metropolitans and Cleveland Blues (1883–1887).
  • March 18 - Alan Storke, 25, National League infielder who played from 1906 through 1909 for the Pittsburgh Pirates and St. Louis Cardinals.
  • April 2 - Jim Nealon, 25, first baseman from 1906 to 1907 for the Pittsburgh Pirates, who tied with Harry Steinfeldt the National League RBI title during his rookie season.
  • April 9 - Bob Addy, 65, second baseman/outfielder for six different teams (1871–1877), who also managed the Philadelphia White Stockings (1875) and Cincinnati Reds (1877).
  • April 16 - Bill Kienzle, 48, outfielder for the Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association (1882) and the Philadelphia Keystones of the Union Association (1884).
  • April 16 - Tom Loftus, 53, manager of teams in Milwaukee, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and Washington, and later chairman of rules committee.

May–June[edit]

  • May 4 - Patrick Gillespie, 58, slugging left fielder who hit .276 with 10 home runs and 371 RBI in 714 games for the New York Giants and Troy Trojans of the National League (1880–1887).
  • May 25 - Bill Hassamaer, 45, outfielder who played from 1894 to 1896 for the Louisville Colonels and Washington Senators of the National League.
  • June 22 - Tom Doran, 29, catcher for the Boston Americans and Detroit Tigers between 1904 and 1906.

July–August[edit]

  • July 14 - Jack Horner, pitcher for the 1894 Baltimore Orioles of the American Association.
  • July 27 - Theodore Conover, 42, pitcher for the 1889 Cincinnati Red Stockings of the American Association.
  • August 19 - Bill Lennon, 62, National Association catcher who, on the very first major league game ever played, scored the first run and became the first catcher to throw out a baserunner attempting to steal a base (May 4, 1871).
  • August 31 - Duke Esper, 42, pitcher who posted a 101-110 record and a 4.39 ERA with seven different cubs between 1890 and 1898.

September–October[edit]

  • September 4 - Candy Nelson, 61, shortstop who played 13 seasons between 1872 and 1890 for nine different teams in three different leagues. compiling a .253 career-average in 817 games.
  • September 20 - Lou Schiappacasse, 29, American League right fielder for the 1902 Detroit Tigers.
  • September 24 - George Boone, 39, pitcher who played with the Louisville Colonels of the American Association in 1891.
  • October 2 - Sandy McDougal, 36, pitcher for the Brooklyn Grooms (1895) and St. Louis Cardinals (1905).
  • October 6 - Lawrence Farley, 54, outfielder for the 1884 Washington Nationals of the American Association.
  • October 12 - George Mundinger, 55, catcher for the 1884 Indianapolis Hoosiers of the American Association.
  • October 20 - George Ewell, 59, outfielder who appeared in one game for the 1871 Cleveland Forest Citys of the National Association.

November–December[edit]

  • November 1 - Bob Pettit, 49, infielder/outfielder from 1887 to 1891 for the NL Chicago White Stockings and AA Milwaukee Brewers.
  • November 20 - Jack O'Brien, 50, American Association catcher/first baseman for the Philadelphia Athletics, Brooklyn Grays/Bridegrooms and Baltimore Orioles between 1882 and 1890.
  • November 23 - Charlie Barber, 56, third baseman for the 1884 Cincinnati Outlaw Reds of the Union Association.
  • December 13 - Dan McGann, 39, a three-time .300 hitter and first baseman on the New York Giants' pennant winners of 1904 and 1905, who became the first player to steal five bases in a single game (1904) –a feat not matched in the National League until Davey Lopes did it for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1974) and not surpassed until Otis Nixon of the Atlanta Braves swiped six (1991).
  • December 25 - John Deasley, 49, shortstop who hit .204 in 44 games for the Washington Nationals and Kansas City Cowboys of the Union Association (1884).