1911 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1911 throughout the world.  

Champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

MLB statistical leaders[edit]

American League National League
AVG Ty Cobb DET .420 Honus Wagner PIT .334
HR Frank Baker PHA 11 Frank Schulte CHC 21
RBIs Ty Cobb DET 127 Frank Schulte CHC 107
Wins Jack Coombs PHA 28 Grover Cleveland Alexander PHI 28
ERA Vean Gregg CLE 1.80 Christy Mathewson NYG 1.99
Ks Ed Walsh CWS 255 Rube Marquard NYG 237

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Athletics 101 50 0.669 54–20 47–30
Detroit Tigers 89 65 0.578 13½ 51–25 38–40
Cleveland Naps 80 73 0.523 22 46–30 34–43
Boston Red Sox 78 75 0.510 24 39–37 39–38
Chicago White Sox 77 74 0.510 24 40–37 37–37
New York Highlanders 76 76 0.500 25½ 36–40 40–36
Washington Senators 64 90 0.416 38½ 39–38 25–52
St. Louis Browns 45 107 0.296 56½ 25–53 20–54


National League final standings[edit]

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Giants 99 54 0.647 49–25 50–29
Chicago Cubs 92 62 0.597 49–32 43–30
Pittsburgh Pirates 85 69 0.552 14½ 48–29 37–40
Philadelphia Phillies 79 73 0.520 19½ 42–34 37–39
St. Louis Cardinals 75 74 0.503 22 36–38 39–36
Cincinnati Reds 70 83 0.458 29 38–42 32–41
Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers 64 86 0.427 33½ 31–42 33–44
Boston Rustlers 44 107 0.291 54 19–54 25–53


Events[edit]

  • May 14 - In their first Sunday home game, the Cleveland Naps defeat the New York Highlanders, 16-3, before a crowd of nearly 16,000 spectactors. Cleveland's George Stovall leads the offense with 4 hits.
  • June 18 - The Detroit Tigers staged the biggest comeback in Major League history after overcoming a 13-1 deficit (after 5½ innings) to defeat the Chicago White Sox by a score of 16–15.
  • July 19 - Former circus acrobat Walter Carlisle completed an unassisted triple play for the Vernon Tigers of the Pacific Coast League. With the score tied at 3–3 in the sixth inning, and men on first and second base, Carlisle made a spectacular diving catch of a short fly by batter Roy Akin; stepped on second to retire Charlie Moore, and tagged George Metzger coming from first. The Tigers won the game, 5–4. With his heroic feat, the speedy English-born Carlisle entered the records books as the only outfielder ever to make an unassisted triple play in organized baseball.
  • June 28 - The new Polo Grounds, a horseshoe-shaped structure, opens.
  • July 24 - An American League all-star team - including Walter Johnson, Hal Chase, and Smokey Joe Wood - plays the Cleveland Naps to raise money for the widow of Addie Joss. The All-Stars win, 5-3.
  • September 12 - In the nitecap of a game billed as a pitchers' duel, Boston Rustlers' Cy Young and the New York Giants' Christy Mathewson face each other before 10,000 fans, Boston's largest crowd of the year. Young gives up three home runs and nine runs in less than three innings. After the Giants build a 9–0 lead, Giants' manager John McGraw lifts Mathewson, who pitched just two innings, preferring to save his ace for the pennant race against the Chicago Cubs and the Philadelphia Phillies. This is the only time the two future Hall of Fame pitchers ever face each other.
  • October 26 - The Philadelphia Athletics defeat the New York Giants, 13–2, in Game 6 of the World Series to win their second consecutive World Championship title. Philadelphia wins the series, four games to two. The six consecutive days of rain between Games 3 and 4 caused the longest delay between World Series games until the Loma Prieta earthquake interrupted the 1989 Series, which incidentally featured the same two franchises, albeit on the west coast.
  • December 1 - Future Hall of Fame member Walter Alston is born in Venice, Ohio. Although Alston will come to bat only once during a brief major league career, he will have far greater longevity as the manager of the Dodgers from 1954 to 1976.

Births[edit]

January–February[edit]

March–April[edit]

May–June[edit]

July–August[edit]

September–October[edit]

November–December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January–March[edit]

  • January 18 - Dick Scott, 27, pitcher for the 1901 Cincinnati Reds.
  • February 5 - Dad Clarkson, 44, pitcher who posted a 39-39 record and a 4.90 ERA for four different teams from 1891 to 1896.
  • March 10 - Guy McFadden, 38, first baseman for the 1895 St. Louis Browns of the National League.
  • March 12 - Simon Nicholls, 28, shortstop for the Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Athletics and Cleveland Naps between the 1906 and 1909 seasons.

April–June[edit]

  • April 5 - Frank Hankinson, 54, third baseman and pitcher who played from 1878 through 1888 with the White Stockings, Blues, Trojans, Gothams. Metropolitan and Cowboys.
  • April 14 - Addie Joss, 31, pitcher for Cleveland who won 20 games four times (1905–08), led American League in ERA twice with a career 1.89 ERA, including one-hitter in major league debut, one no-hitter and a perfect game.
  • April 23 - George Craig, 23, pitcher for the 1907 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • April 25 - Jack Rowe, 54, catcher and shortstop for Buffalo and Detroit who batted .300 four times, led NL in triples in 1881; did not strike out in entire 1882 season, later a minor league manager
  • May 26 - Billy O'Brien, 51, third baseman for four teams in two different leagues from 1884 to 1890, who topped the Nationel League batters with 19 home runs in 1887.
  • June 3 - Dad Clarke, 46, who pitched from 1888 to 1898 for the White Stockings/Solons/Giants/Colonels, going 44-51 with a 4.17 ERA.
  • June 23 - John O'Rourke, 59, center fielder who hit .295 in 290 games with the Boston Red Caps (1879–1880) and New York Metropolitans (1883), leading the National League with a .521 slugging in 1879.

July–September[edit]

  • July 4 - Jimmy Mathison, 32, third baseman for the 1902 Baltimore Orioles.
  • July 26 - John Radcliff, 65, shortstop for five seasons in the National Association.
  • August 5 - Bob Caruthers, 47, pitcher who compiled the highest career winning percentage among major leaguers with 250 decisions; led American Association with 40 victories in both 1885 and 1889, pacing St. Louis and Brooklyn to respective pennants; batted .300 twice, later an umpire
  • August 8 - Joe Walsh, 46, infielder for the 1881 Baltimore Orioles of the American Association.
  • August 31 - Will White, 56, pitcher who won over 200 games for Cincinnati teams in 10-year career, led league in wins and strikeouts twice each; first major leaguer to wear eyeglasses, and batterymate of brother Deacon from 1877–79

September–December[edit]

  • October 1 - Leo Hafford, 28, pitcher for the 1906 Cincinnati Reds.
  • October 4 - Emil Geiss, 44, infielder/pitcher for the 1887 Chicago White Stockings.
  • October 6 - Larry Murphy, 54, Canadian outfielder for the 1891 for the Washington Statesmen.
  • October 10 - Bill Parks, 62, pitcher and left fielder for three teams from 1875 to 1876. Managed the 1875 Washington Nationals for eight games in 1875.
  • October 19 - Marshall King, 61, outfielder who played from 1867 to 1872 for the Haymakers, White Stockings and Haymakers.
  • October 25 - Chris Rickley, 52, shortstop for the 1884 for the Philadelphia Keystones of the Union Association.
  • November 4 - Warren Burtis, 63, National League umpire in 1876 and 1877.
  • November 8 - Oscar Bielaski, 64, right fielder for five seasons, from 1872 to 1876, who was on the 1876 National League champion Chicago White Stockings.
  • November 8 - Frank Gatins, 40, infielder for the Washington Senators (1898) and Brooklyn Superbas (1901).
  • November 22 - Ed Cermak, 30, outfielder for the 1901 Cleveland Blues of the American League.
  • November 6 - John Hamill, 40, pitcher for the 1884 Washington Nationals.
  • December 6 - Ed Glenn, 36, National League shortstop who played between 1898 and 1902 with the Washington Senators, New York Giants and Chicago Orphans.
  • December 31 - Pete Gilbert, 43, third baseman for the Orioles/Grooms/Colonels American Association teams from 1890 to 1894.