1912 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1912 Michigan Wolverines football
1912 Michigan Wolverines football team.jpg
Conference Independent
1912 record 5–2
Head coach Fielding H. Yost (12th year)
Captain George C. Thomson
Home stadium Ferry Field
Seasons
« 1911 1913 »

The 1912 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1912 college football season. The team's head coach was Fielding H. Yost in his 12th year at Michigan. The Wolverines compiled a record of 5–2 and outscored opponents 158 to 65.

The team's captain and fullback George C. Thomson was also the leading scorer with 49 points on eight touchdowns and one extra point. Two Michigan players, Miller Pontius and Jimmy Craig, were consensus All-Western players. Pontius was also selected as a first-team All-American by Alfred Harvey.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent Site Result Attendance
October 5, 1912 Case Ferry FieldAnn Arbor, MI W 34–0   3,500
October 12, 1912 Michigan Agricultural Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 55–7    
October 19, 1912 at Ohio State Ohio FieldColumbus, OH W 14–0   10,000
October 26, 1912 at Syracuse Archbold StadiumSyracuse, NY L 7–18    
November 2, 1912 South Dakota Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 7–6    
November 9, 1912 at Penn Franklin FieldPhiladelphia, PA L 21–27   15,000
November 16, 1912 Cornelldagger Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 20–7    
daggerHomecoming. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary[edit]

Pre-season[edit]

Ferry Field gate, c. 1912

In May 1912, the University of Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania jointly announced that they had signed an agreement to continue their annual football rivalry games through the 1915 season.[1] Since leaving the Big Ten Conference, Michigan had played annual rivalry games against Penn at or near the end of the season. Penn was one of the dominant football programs of the era, winning seven national championships between 1894 and 1912.[2]

In June 1912, the Detroit Free Press wrote that, with eight varsity letter winners returning from the 1911 team, Michigan's football prospects were the "brightest in years."[3]

In early August 1912, invitations were sent to candidates for the football team for training camp at Ferry Field in mid-September. Instead of holding training camp at Whitmore Lake, Michigan, as had been the tradition for several years, the 1912 training camp was held on campus.[4][5][6] On the eve of the opening of training camp, Michigan announced that former Michigan star, Henry Schulte, would join Fielding H. Yost's staff as an assistant coach.[7][8] Stung by fumbles in past years, Coach Yost posted a sign on the door of the training house at Ferry Field that read, "No butterfingers need apply."[9]

On September 23, 1912, the Detroit Free Press reported from training camp that one of the Michigan players had broken the program's marathon eating record. The player, who asked that his identity not be disclosed, reportedly required two waiters "to minister to his wants alone."[10] At the team's lunch on September 22nd, the player consumed a bowl of cream of tomato soup, a dish of celery, "half a dozen or so bunches of grapes," a dish of crackers, more than ten slices of bread and butter, two helpings of chicken, "three thick slices of roast beef with brown gravy," four side dishes of potatoes, two side orders of string beans, three dishes of ice cream, two dishes of rice pudding, two glasses of milk, and a pitcher of water. The meal was consumed in "the fast time of 2:13."[10] After the contest, Michigan's trainer Stephen Farrell aid, "More could not have been asked," to which the person in charge of feeding the team replied, "More would not have been given."[10]

On the day before the season opener, Coach Yost declined to give the press his final starting lineup. He noted that George C. Paterson would start at center with George C. Thomson at fullback and Jimmy Craig at left halfback. However, questions remained as to whether Yost would start Herbert Huebel or Michael Boyle at quarterback and Miller Pontius or Roy Torbet at left end.[11]

Case[edit]

Week 1: Case at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Case 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 14 7 0 13 34
  • Date: October 5, 1912
  • Location: Ferry Field
    Ann Arbor, MI
  • Game start: 2:30 p.m.
  • Game attendance: 6,000
  • Referee: Ralph P. Hoagland (Princeton)

Michigan opened its 1912 season with a 34–0 victory over the team from Cleveland's Case Scientific School. The game was the 16th meeting between the two programs. Michigan had won 14 times and tied once.[12]

The game was played in hot weather in front of a crowd totaling somewhat over 6,000 persons at Ferry Field in Ann Arbor. The Detroit Free Press wrote that the heat slowed both teams and "made anything except pop hard work."[13] Halfback Jimmy Craig and fullback George C. Thomson were the principal ground gainers for Michigan. The Free Press praised Craig for his "wonderful 'crooked' running" and Thomson for his accurate forward passing, solid defense, and for "hitting the line like a wild engine."[13] Michigan scored three touchdowns in the first half, two by Thomson and one by Herbert Huebel. Craig and Thomas Bushnell also scored touchdowns in the fourth quarter. George C. Paterson kicked four extra points.[13][14]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's lineup against Case was Pontius, Peterson and Wyman (left end), Cole and Musser (left tackle), Clem Quinn (left guard), Paterson (center), Allmendinger (right guard), Raynsford and McHale (right tackle), Barton (right end), Huebel, Boyle and Bushnell (quarterback), Craig and Hughitt (left halfback), Carpell, Torbet, and Collette (right halfback), and Thomson and Cyril Quinn (fullback).[13][15]

Michigan Agricultural[edit]

Week 2: Michigan Agricultural at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan Agricultural 7 0 0 0 7
Michigan 0 7 14 34 55

In the second week of the season, Michigan defeated Michigan Agricultural College by a 55–7 score at Ferry Field. It was the seventh game in the Michigan - Michigan State football rivalry, and Michigan had a 5–0–1 record in the six prior meetings, outscoring the Aggies by a combined total of 225 to 6.[16]

The Aggies took a 7-0 lead in the first quarter on an 85-yard interception return by left end Blake Miller. The touchdown was the first ever scored by a Michigan Aggies team against Michigan. Michigan tied the score in the second quarter and added 48 points in the second half. Michigan scored eight touchdowns in the game, two each by Jimmy Craig and Tommy Hughitt and one each by George C. Thomson, Herbert Huebel, Charles Barton, and Thomas Bushnell. George C. Paterson kicked seven extra points for Michigan.[17]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's lineup against the Aggies was Pontius, Peterson, Wyman and Bleich (left end), Raynsford and Cole (left tackle), Quinn and Musser (left guard), Paterson (center), Allmendinger (right guard), McHale (right tackle), Torbet and Barton (right end), Huebel and Bushnell (quarterback), Craig and Hughitt (left halfback), Carpell and Collette (right halfback), and Thomson and Cyril Quinn (fullback).[17][18]

at Ohio State[edit]

Week 3: Michigan at Ohio State
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 0 0 7 14
Ohio State 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: October 19, 1912
  • Location: Ohio Field
    Columbus, OH
  • Game attendance: 9,000
  • Referee: Lt. Horatio Hackett (West Point)

In the third week of the season, Michigan defeated Ohio State by a 14–0 score at Columbus, Ohio. It was the 14th game in the Michigan - Ohio State football rivalry, and Michigan had an 11–0–2 record in the 13 prior meetings.[19] On October 19, 1912, more than 500 Michigan supporters traveled on a special train to Columbus to attend the game.[20]

Michigan's touchdowns were scored by Jimmy Craig and George C. Thomson. George C. Paterson kicked both extra points. The game was played in front of a crowd of 9,000 persons, the largest to watch a Michigan-Ohio State game up to that time. With Ohio State having been admitted into the Western Conference for the 1913 season, the 1912 Michigan-Ohio State game marked the close of athletic relations between the schools. [21] Michigan and Ohio State did not resume their football rivalry until 1918, when Michigan returned to the conference.[19]

After the Ohio State game, the Detroit Free Press wrote: "The material is undoubtedly on hand to make the team one of the greatest that has ever worn the Maize and Blue but the men are not playing together nor are they putting up the game that they seem to be capable. Individually the squad contains many stars and players of good calibre but collectively the team is mediocre."[22]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's lineup against Ohio State (starters listed first) was Pontius (left end), Cole (left tackle), Quinn (left guard), Paterson and Musser (center), Allmendinger (right guard), McHale (right tackle), Barton and Torbet (right end), Huebel and Bushnell (quarterback), Craig and Collette (left halfback), Carpell and Hughitt (right halfback), and Thomson (fullback). Horatio Hackett was the referee, and Paul Hoagland was the umpire.[21][23][24]

at Syracuse[edit]

Week 4: Michigan at Syracuse
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 0 0 0 7
Syracuse 0 6 6 6 18
  • Date: October 26, 1912
  • Location: Standard Oil Stadium
    Syracuse, NY
  • Referee: Pendleton

In the fourth week of the season, Michigan lost to Syracuse by an 18–7 score at Standard Oil Stadium in Syracuse, New York. It was Michigan's fifth game against Syracuse, with Michigan having a 2–1–1 record in the four prior meetings.[25]

The game was played in light rain and on a wet field. The day before the game, E. A. Batchelor described the condition of the field in the Detroit Free Press: "Judging by the condition of the Standard Oil stadium tomorrow's football game between Michigan and Syracuse is more likely to be a test of seamanship than of speed, strength and strategy. When it comes to collecting and retaining water, the local gridiron asks no odds of the Atlantic ocean. . . . Syracuse is rather tickled over the especially fine crop of mud now ripening in the stadium, but Yost doesn't like it a bit. . . . On a hard, dry gridiron Michigan undoubtedly would be a top-heavy favorite over the Orange. . . . In the approaching amphibious test, however, everybody seems to look for a bad football game in which the worst team may win."[26]

Michigan took a 7–0 lead in the first quarter on a 70-yard scoring drive capped with a three-yard run by fullback George C. Thomson and an extra point by Herbert Huebel. Michigan was held scoreless in the remaining three quarters, and Syracuse scored a touchdown in each of those quarters. Michigan center Charles Barton was blamed for five bad long snaps to Thomson that "proved disastrous for the Ann Arborites."[27] Syracuse halfback Castle scored two touchdowns. Syracuse's final touchdown followed a fumble by Huebel that was returned 45 yards by Castle.[27]

Michigan's lineup against Syracuse was Torbet and Tessin (left end), Cole (left tackle), Quinn (left guard), Barton and Musser (center), Allmendinger (right guard), McHale (right tackle), Pontius and Carpell (right end), Huebel and Bushnell (quarterback), Craig (left halfback), Hughitt and Boyle (right halfback), and Thomson (fullback). Pendleton was the referee, and Hinkey was the umpire.[27][28]

South Dakota[edit]

Week 5: South Dakota at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
South Dakota 0 6 0 0 6
Michigan 0 0 0 7 7

In the fifth week of the season, Michigan defeated the South Dakota Coyotes by a 7–6 score at Ferry Field. The game was the first and only meeting between the two football programs.[29] The 1912 South Dakota football team was 5–0 in its other games and outscored those opponents 234 to 6, including a 10–0 shutout victory over Minnesota at Minneapolis and a 73–6 victory over South Dakota State.[30] In the Detroit Free Press, E. A. Batchelor wrote that South Dakota was an "unknown quantity," and the game was "impossible to 'dope'."[31]

South Dakota took a 6–0 lead with a touchdown in the second quarter. Michigan took the lead with less than a minute left in the game on a touchdown by George C. Thomson and an extra point kick by George C. Paterson.[32][33]

Michigan's lineup against South Dakota was Torbet (left end), Cole and Musser (left tackle), Quinn (left guard), Paterson (center), Allmendinger (right guard), Pontius (right tackle), Carpell (right end), Huebel (quarterback), Craig (left halfback), Boyle and Hughitt (right halfback), and Thomson (fullback).[34]

at Penn[edit]

Week 6: Michigan at Penn
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 14 7 0 0 21
Penn 0 7 7 13 27

On November 9, 1912, Michigan lost to the Penn Quakers, 27–21, at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. The 1912 game was the eighth meeting between the schools. Penn won the first four games, and Michigan went 2–0–1 from 1909 to 1911.[36]

The game was played in cold weather and heavy winds. Michigan took a 21–0 lead in the game, but Penn staged a comeback culminating in a long touchdown run in the final minute of the game. Herbert Huebel ran for Michigan's first touchdown, and George C. Paterson kicked the extra point. Michigan scored again on the next drive, this time on a touchdown run by George C. Thomson. Paterson kicked the extra point, and Michigan led 14–0 at the end of the first quarter. In the second quarter, Thomson scored again, and Paterson kicked the extra point to give Michigan a 21–0 lead. Late in the second quarter, Penn scored to cut the lead to 21–7 at halftime.[37]

Penn held Michigan scoreless in the second half while scoring three touchdowns. In the fourth quarter, Penn cut Michigan's lead to 21–20 but missed the extra point attempt that would have tied the game. In the final minute of play, Michigan was forced to punt. Penn's quarterback Marshall took the punt at midfield and returned it 55 yards to give Penn a 26–21 lead. The crowd at Franklin Field swarmed onto the field, and a lengthy delay ensued as the police drove thousands of Penn fans from the field. When play resumed, Penn kicked the extra point to extend its lead to 27–21. With less than a minute left in the game, Michigan threw three forward passes, all of which were incomplete.[37][35]

Michigan's lineup against Penn was Torbet (left end), Cole (left tackle), Quinn (left guard), Paterson and Musser (center), Allmendinger (right guard), Pontius (right tackle), Carpell and Barton (right end), Huebel and Bushnell (quarterback), Craig (left halfback), Hughitt and Boyle (right halfback), and Thomson (fullback).[37][38]

Cornell[edit]

Week 7: Cornell at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Cornell 0 7 0 0 7
Michigan 7 0 0 13 20
  • Date: November 16, 1912
  • Location: Ferry Field
    Ann Arbor, MI
  • Game start: 2:30 p.m.
  • Referee: Lt. Horatio Hackett (West Point)

In the final week of the season, Michigan defeated Cornell by a 20–7 score at Ferry Field. The game was the tenth meeting between Michigan and Cornell. Michigan had a record of 1–8 in the first nine games.[39]

Michigan took a 7–0 lead in the first quarter on a forward pass from Roy Torbet to Miller Pontius. Cornell tied the game with a touchdown in the second quarter. The game remained tied going into the fourth quarter. Michigan took the lead on a touchdown pass from Herbert Huebel to Pontius. Michigan's final touchdown was scored by Huebel on a 55-yard punt return in the last minute of the game. George C. Thomson and George C. Paterson each kicked an extra point.[40][41]

Michigan's lineup against Cornell was Torbet (left end), Cole (left tackle), Quinn (left guard), Paterson (center), Allmendinger and Raynsford (right guard), Musser (right tackle), Pontius (right end), Huebel (quarterback), Craig and Collette (left halfback), Hughitt (right halfback), and Thomson (fullback). [40][42]

Post-season[edit]

At the end of the 1912 season, Miller Pontius was the only Michigan player to receive first-team All-America honors. He was selected as a first-team All-American by Alfred Harvey.[43]

Several Michigan players received first-team All-Westerns honors. Pontius and Jimmy Craig were consensus picks. The Michigan players chosen by the various All-Western selectors were:

Players[edit]

Varsity letter winners[edit]

The following players won varsity "M" letters for their participation on the 1912 football team:[49]

  • Ernest Allmendinger, Ann Arbor, MI - started all 7 games at right guard
  • Charles P. Barton, Jr., New York, NY - started 3 games at right end (Case, Ohio State, Penn), 1 game at center (Syracuse); also appeared in the M.A.C. game as a substitute at right end
  • Michael H. Boyle, Duluth, Minnesota - started one game at right halfback (South Dakota); also appeared as a substitute at quarterback against Case and at right halfback against Syracuse and Penn
  • Thomas H. Bushnell, East Cleveland, Ohio - appeared as a substitute at quarterback against Case, M.A.C., Ohio State, Syracuse and Penn
  • Otto Carpell, Saginaw, MI - started 3 games at right halfback (Case, M.A.C., Ohio State), 2 games at right end (South Dakota and Penn); also appeared as a substitute at right end against Syracuse
  • Walter Munson Cole, Cedar Springs, MI - started 6 games at left tackle (also appeared in the M.A.C. game as a substitute at the same position)
  • William H. Collette, Menominee, MI - appeared as a substitute at halfback against Case, M.A.C., Ohio State, and Cornell
  • James B. Craig, Detroit, MI - started all 7 games at left halfback
  • Herbert Huebel, Menominee, MI - started all 7 games at quarterback
  • Ernest "Tommy" Hughitt, Escanaba, MI - started 3 games at right halfback (Syracuse, Penn and Cornell); also appeared as a substitute at halfback against Case, M.A.C., Ohio State, and South Dakota
  • James C. Musser, Akron, Ohio - started 1 game at right tackle (Cornell); also appeared as a substitute at left tackle against Case and South Dakota, at left guard against M.A.C., and at center against Ohio State, Syracuse and Penn
  • George C. Paterson, Detroit, MI - started 6 games at center (did not play against Syracuse)
  • Miller Pontius, Circleville, Ohio - started 3 games at left end (Case, M.A.C., and Ohio State), 2 games at right end (Syracuse and Cornell), 2 games at right tackle (South Dakota and Penn)
  • Clement Quinn, Saginaw, MI[50] - started all 7 games at left guard
  • James W. Raynsford, Detroit, MI - started 1 game at left tackle (M.A.C.), 1 game at right tackle (Case); also appeared as a substitute at right guard against Cornell
  • George C. Thomson, Cadillac, MI - started all 7 games at fullback
  • Roy Torbet, Detroit, MI - started 4 games at left end (Syracuse, South Dakota, Penn and Cornell), 1 game at right end (M.A.C.); also appeared as a substitute at right halfback against Case and at right end against Ohio State

Reserves[edit]

  • Walter H. Allmendinger, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Everett L. Bentley, Detroit, MI
  • Louis Bleich, Buffalo, NY - appeared as a substitute at left end against M.A.C.
  • Cecil Aunger Brown, Chicago, Illinois
  • Edgar N. Eisenhower, Abilene, Kansas (older brother of U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower)
  • John H. Jay, Shenandoah, Iowa
  • Henry W. Lichtner, Grand Rapids, MI
  • M. Mathieson, Detroit, MI
  • Bernard A. McDonald, Rochester, NY
  • Frank M. McHale, Logansport, Indiana - started 3 games at right tackle (M.A.C., Ohio State, and Syracuse); also appeared as a substitute at right tackle against Case
  • Leon Ford Merritt, Detroit, MI
  • Frank G. Millard, Corunna, MI
  • Floyd C. Morse, Detroit, MI
  • Walter W. Paisley, Dubuque, Iowa
  • John C. Peterson, Le Mars, Iowa - appeared as a substitute at left end against Case and M.A.C.
  • Reuben Peterson, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Cyril Quinn, Saginaw, MI - appeared as a substitute at fullback against Case and M.A.C.
  • Samuel S. Scott, Cranford, New Jersey
  • Ben O. Shepard, Detroit, MI
  • Emil Tessin, Hemlock, MI - appeared as a substitute at left end against Syracuse
  • Walter John Thienes, Indianapolis, Indiana
  • John A. Tompkins, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Guy Wells, Brewster, Ohio
  • Stephen B. Wilson, Newton, Massachusetts
  • Charles E. Wyman, Nunica, MI - appeared as a substitute at left end against Case and M.A.C.
  • Harry Young, Detroit, MI

Scoring leaders[edit]

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals Points
George C. Thomson 8 1 0 49
Jimmy Craig 4 0 0 24
Herbert Huebel 4 1 0 24
George C. Paterson 0 18 0 18
Tommy Hughitt 2 0 0 12
Miller Pontius 2 0 0 12
Thomas Bushnell 2 0 0 12
Charles Barton 1 0 0 6
Totals 23 20 0 158

Awards and honors[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "To Meet Pennsy for Four Years: Michigan Has New Football Agreement With Quakers for This Period; Next Two Games in Brotherly Love Town; Then Red and Blue Comes West for Pair of Contests at Ferry Field". Detroit Free Press. May 25, 1912. p. 8. 
  2. ^ "2011 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records". Indianapolis, IN: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2011. pp. 70–75. Retrieved March 18, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Football Outlook for Wolverines Is Exceedingly Bright: Plenty of Good Material for All Positions Is at Hand and the Fight for Places Will Be Merry One--Eight "M" Men Are Available, While Reserve and Fresh Candidates Are Numerous and Likely Looking". Detroit Free Press. June 2, 1912. p. 20. 
  4. ^ "Michigan Football Candidates to Work Out at Ferry Field". Detroit Free Press. August 11, 1912. p. 20. 
  5. ^ "Michigan Football Men Keep in Shape". Detroit Free Press. September 8, 1912. p. 21. 
  6. ^ "Michigan Football Men Will report on Tuesday". Detroit Free Press. September 16, 1912. p. 9. 
  7. ^ "Schulte Is To Assist Coach Yost: Practice Starts Tuesday Morning". Detroit Free Press. September 17, 1912. p. 12. 
  8. ^ "No Idle Moments for 'Varsity Football Men". Detroit Free Press. September 29, 1912. p. 22. 
  9. ^ E. A. Batchelor (October 1, 1912). "No Butterfingered Men Need Apply Yost Has Little Use For Fumblers". Detroit Free Press. p. 12. 
  10. ^ a b c "U. of M. Squad Boasts a Marathon Eating Champ: If This Man Can Play the Gridiron Game As Well As He Feeds, Yost Has a Star of the First Magnitude -- Opponents Beware!". Detroit Free Press. September 23, 1912. p. 6. 
  11. ^ "Yost Front Is All But Concluded: Students Can Almost Figure on Lineup That Will Start in Opening Game With Case -- Flock of Subs May Get In; Huebel Is Choice for Signal Post; Cleveland School Will Have "Vets" Against Michigan's Comparatively Weak Forwards". Detroit Free Press. October 5, 1912. p. 12. 
  12. ^ "Michigan vs Case Institute of Technology (OH)". College Football Data Warehouse. 
  13. ^ a b c d "Michigan Makes Case Look Puny: Yost's Powerful Eleven Runs Rings Around Scientists in Opening Struggle on Ferry Field -- Wolverines Show Strength on Offense, but Defense Needs Bolstering -- Ann Arborites Score 34 Points Against". Detroit Free Press. October 6, 1912. p. 17. 
  14. ^ "Michigan Humbles Case, 34-0: Swamps Ohioans in Opener in Overheated Game. FORWARD PASSES SUCCESS. Gain 130 Yards by Open Plays and Intercept Two by Visitors". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 6, 1912. p. C4. 
  15. ^ "Michigan, 35; Case, 0". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1912. p. 83. 
  16. ^ "Michigan vs Michigan State". College Football Data Warehouse. 
  17. ^ a b "Yost's Men Run Up High Score Against Aggies: Michigan Wins Annual Contest 55 to 7 -- Intercepted Forward Pass and 85-Yard Run by B. Miller Gives M. A. C. Only Chance to Count; First Period All Farmers; Are Even at End of Second; Wolverines Fail to Get Started Until Game Is Half Over -- Both Teams Use Open Style Play -- Torbet Shows Well". Detroit Free Press. October 13, 1912. p. 17. 
  18. ^ "Michigan, 55; M.A.C., 7". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1912. p. 83. 
  19. ^ a b "Michigan vs Ohio State". College Football Data Warehouse. 
  20. ^ "Michigan Students Out Strong 500 Leave For O.S.U. Contest". Detroit Free Press. October 19, 1912. p. 10. 
  21. ^ a b Frank Shaw (October 20, 1912). "Michigan Is Returned Victorious Over Ohio State, 14 to 0: Buckeyes Offer Stubborn Battle to Yost's Eleven; Wolverines Forced to Exert Full Strength to Win Game That Marks Close of Schools' Athletic Relations; Craig and Thomson Score the Touchdowns That Win; Detroit Boy Is Brilliant Performer in Ann Arbor Cast -- Line Shows Great Improvement Over Last Week's Showing". Detroit Free Press. p. 17. 
  22. ^ "Michigan Has the Stars But Lacks Team Work: When Men Get to Playing in Cohesion and Arouse Their Ire Yost Will Have Eleven That Should Trim Them All -- Center Trio and Ends Appear to Good Advantage and Probably Will Stick". Detroit Free Press. October 20, 1912. p. 20. 
  23. ^ "Michigan, 14; O.S.U., 0". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1912. pp. 83–84. 
  24. ^ "Craig Helps Michigan Win; Half Back Tower of Strength for Wolverines at Columbus; Ohio State Beaten, 14 to 0; Capt. Thompson Makes Touchdown for the Ann Arbor Team". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 20, 1912. p. C3. 
  25. ^ "Michigan vs Syracuse (NY)". College Football Data Warehouse. 
  26. ^ E. A. Batchelor (October 26, 1912). "Syracuse Stadium Is Regular Sea of Mud: Prospects for Fast Game Small; Two Positions on Wolverine Team Are in Doubt, Involving Center and One Back Job; Barton Looks Like Choice at Pivot; Michigan Is 10 to 6 Favorite With No Takers on Eve of the Battle -- Crowd Expected". Detroit Free Press. p. 10. 
  27. ^ a b c "Syracuse Humbles Proud Wolverines; Game Won 18 to 7; Overconfident Michigan Warriors Invade East and Are Given Rude Surprise; Fumbles Factor in Result; Easterners, After Two Defeats, Show Reversal of Form and Trim Ann Arborites; Barton's Passing Is Costly". Detroit Free Press. October 27, 1912. p. C1. 
  28. ^ "Michigan, 7; Syracuse, 18". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1912. p. 84. 
  29. ^ "Michigan vs South Dakota". College Football Data Warehouse. 
  30. ^ "South Dakota Yearly Results". College Football Data Warehouse. 
  31. ^ E. A. Batchelor (November 2, 1912). "South Dakota Is Unknown Quantity Impossible to 'Dope' Today's Battle". Detroit Free Press. p. 10. 
  32. ^ E. A. Batchelor (November 3, 1912). "Michigan Beats South Dakota in Last Minute of Play: Wolverine Is Victorious by a Single Point; Vermillion Scores Touchdown in Second Period, Maize and Blue Makes One in Fourth -- Visitors Miss Their Chance to Try for Goal -- Paterson Kicks Successfully for Home Team -- Score is 7 to 6 With Battle as Close as Count Indicates". Detroit Free Press. p. 17. 
  33. ^ "Michigan Noses Out Dakota: Westerners Play Wolverines to Standstill, but Lose, 7-6; Blocked Punt Saves Day; Misplay Gives Northern Men Chance to Make Tying Touchdown". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 3, 1912. p. C2. 
  34. ^ "Michigan, 6; South Dakota, 5". The Michigan Alumnus. December 1912. p. 135. 
  35. ^ a b E. A. Batchelor (November 9, 1912). "Michigan Meets Sons of Penn on Franklin Field". Detroit Free Press. p. 10. 
  36. ^ "Michigan vs Pennsylvania". College Football Data Warehouse. 
  37. ^ a b c "Penn Noses Out Wolverines, 27-21: Marshall's Dash in the Last Minute of Play Gives Quakers Victory; Batters Down Big Lead; Home Team Bewilders Visitors with Passes After Three Touchdown Handicap". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 10, 1912. p. C1. 
  38. ^ "Pennsylvania, 27; Michigan, 21". The Michigan Alumnus. December 1912. pp. 135–136. 
  39. ^ "Michigan vs Cornell". College Football Data Warehouse. 
  40. ^ a b Reed L. Parker (November 17, 1912). "Michigan Trims Cornell Eleven: Driving Finish by Yost's Men Nets 2 Touchdowns and Victory by 20 to 7; Even for Three Periods". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. C1. 
  41. ^ E. A. Batchelor (November 17, 1912). "Maize and Blue Defeats the Big Men from Ithaca: Two Long Forward Passes Produce Touchdowns and Huebel Contributs Another on 55-Yard Run in Last Minute of Play; Wolverine Quarter Worms Way Through Entire Eleven; Ithacans Score at End of Second Quarter After Pass Carries Ball to Yost's Three-Yard Line; Visitors Strong on Straight Football". Detroit Free Press. p. 17. 
  42. ^ "Cornell, 7; Michigan, 20". The Michigan Alumnus. December 1912. p. 136. 
  43. ^ "Two Badgers on All-American Team". The La Crosse Tribune. December 9, 1912. 
  44. ^ "Picks 6 Badgers for All-Western: E.C. Patterson in Collier's Finds Wisconsin Prolific of Stars; Des Jardien at Center; Two Wolverines, One Gopher, and One Iowan Given Places on Eleven". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 3, 1912. p. 15. 
  45. ^ "Gridiron Stars Picked by Eckersall for All-Western Football Eleven". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 1, 1912. p. C3. 
  46. ^ "Two All-Westerns". The Michigan Alumnus. December 1912. p. 137. 
  47. ^ "Two Michigan Men on This All-West Team Picked by Chicagoan: Matt Foley, of Chicago Inter Ocean, Gives Places on His Star Eleven to Pontius and Craig -- Patterson of U. of M., and Julian and Gifford, of M. A. C., Picked for Second Eleven". Detroit Free Press. November 24, 1913. p. 10. 
  48. ^ "Six Michigan Players in Yost's All-Western Team: Torbet, Quinn, Pontius, Paterson, Craig and Thomson Earn Places on Mythical Eleven--"Hurry-Up" Thinks Michigan Superior of Conference Outfits". Detroit Free Press. November 28, 1912. p. 11. 
  49. ^ "Varsity Men Receive Insignia". The Michigan Alumnus. December 1912. p. 138. 
  50. ^ Clement P. Quinn, born November of 1890 or 1891. He was a resident of Saginaw at the time of the 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 Censuses. He listed his occupation as a dealer in land in 1920 and as broker of timberlands in 1930. He later worked as a trust officer at Second Bank & Trust Co. in Saginaw. He died December 13, 1975 at Saginaw.

External links[edit]