1912 in poetry

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1909 1910 1911 -1912- 1913 1914 1915
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   In literature: 1909 1910 1911 -1912- 1913 1914 1915     
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Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

Events[edit]

The Open Door will be the policy of this magazine—may the great poet we are looking for never find it shut, or half-shut, against his ample genius! To this end the editors hope to keep free from entangling alliances with any single class or school. They desire to print the best English verse which is being written today, regardless of where, by whom, or under what theory of art it is written. Nor will the magazine promise to limit its editorial comments to one set of opinions.

Imagist poets[edit]

  • Three poets meet and work out the principles of Imagist poetry. The most prominent of the poets, Ezra Pound, later writes about the formulation in 1954:[3]
In the spring or early summer of 1912, 'H.D.' [Hilda Doolittle], Richard Aldington and myself decided that we were agreed upon the three principles following:
1. Direct treatment of the 'thing' whether subjective or objective.
2. To use absolutely no word that does not contribute to the presentation.
3. As regarding rhythm: to compose in the sequence of the musical phrase, not in the sequence of a metronome.
  • At a meeting with Doolittle and Aldington in the British Museum tea room, Pound appends the signature H.D. Imagiste to Doolittle's poetry, creating a label that was to stick to the poet for most of her writing life
  • October — Pound submits to Poetry: A Magazine of Verse three poems each by Doolittle and Aldington under the label Imagiste. Aldington's poems are printed in the November issue, and H.D.'s appear in the January 1913 issue. The March 1913 issue of Poetry also contains Pound's A Few Don'ts by an Imagiste and F. S. Flint's essay Imagisme. This publication history means that Imagism, although London-based, has its first readership in the United States.

Works published in English[edit]

Canada[edit]

India, in English[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

United States[edit]

Other in English[edit]

Works published in other languages[edit]

France[edit]

Indian subcontinent[edit]

Including all of the British colonies that later became India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. Listed alphabetically by first name, regardless of surname:

Telugu language[edit]

  • Gurajada Appa Rao (surname: Gurajada), narrative poems written in a four-line, stanzaic form, new for Telugu poetry:

Other languages of the Indian subcontinent[edit]

  • Akshay Kumar Baral, Esa, Indian, Bengali-language
  • Maithilisharan Gupta, "Bharat Bharati" ("The Voice of India"), Hindi poem glorifying the nation's past, deploring its contemporary social and political condition and calling for good relations between Hindus and Muslims at a time when animosity between the two groups was rising[20]
  • Sumatiben Mehta, Hridayjharnan, a poem conveying her anguish during an extended illness (posthumous), written in the Gujarati language[21]

Other[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

Births[edit]

Death years link to the corresponding "[year] in poetry" article:

Deaths[edit]

Birth years link to the corresponding "[year] in poetry" article:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lord, Walter (1955). A Night to Remember. New York: Holt. 
  2. ^ Dutta, Krishna; Robinson, Andrew (1995). Rabindranath Tagore: the myriad-minded man. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 178–179. ISBN 9780747520047. 
  3. ^ Pound, Ezra, "A Retrospect" (Literary Essays of Ezra Pound. London: Faber & Faber, 1954)
  4. ^ Mary Jane Edwards, "Drummond, William Henry," Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online, Web, Apr. 15, 2011.
  5. ^ Garvin, John William, editor, Canadian Poets (anthology), published by McClelland, Goodchild & Stewart, 1916, retrieved via Google Books, June 5, 2009
  6. ^ Wanda Campbell, "Susan Frances Harrison," Hidden Rooms: Early Canadian Women Poets, Canadian Poetry P, 2002, Canadian Poetry, UWO, Web, May 4, 2010.
  7. ^ Keith, W. J., "Poetry in English: 1867–1918", article in The Canadian Encyclopedia, retrieved February 8, 2009
  8. ^ Vinayak Krishna Gokak, The Golden Treasury Of Indo-Anglian Poetry (1828-1965), p 313, New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi (1970, first edition; 2006 reprint), ISBN 81-260-1196-3, retrieved August 6, 2010
  9. ^ Vinayak Krishna Gokak, The Golden Treasury Of Indo-Anglian Poetry (1828-1965), p 322, New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi (1970, first edition; 2006 reprint), ISBN 81-260-1196-3, retrieved August 6, 2010
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Cox, Michael, ed. (2004). The Concise Oxford Chronology of English Literature. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-860634-6. 
  11. ^ a b Brenier, Laurence A., An Introduction to West Indian Poetry, p 62, Cambridge University Press, 1998, ISBN 978-0-521-58712-9, retrieved via Google Books, February 7, 2009
  12. ^ Knippling, Alpana Sharma, "Chapter 3: Twentieth-Century Indian Literature in English", in Natarajan, Nalini, and Emanuel Sampath Nelson, editors, Handbook of Twentieth-century Literatures of India (Google books link), Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996, ISBN 978-0-313-28778-7, retrieved December 10, 2008
  13. ^ a b c d Ackroyd, Peter, Ezra Pound, Thames and Hudson Ltd., London, 1980, "Bibliography" chapter, p 121
  14. ^ a b c d e f Ludwig, Richard M., and Clifford A. Nault, Jr., Annals of American Literature: 1602–1983, 1986, New York: Oxford University Press ("If the title page is one year later than the copyright date, we used the latter since publishers frequently postdate books published near the end of the calendar year." — from the Preface, p vi)
  15. ^ a b Hartley, Anthony, editor, The Penguin Book of French Verse: 4: The Twentieth Century, Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1967
  16. ^ a b Bree, Germaine, Twentieth-Century French Literature, translated by Louise Guiney, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1983
  17. ^ a b c Auster, Paul, editor, The Random House Book of Twentieth-Century French Poetry: with Translations by American and British Poets, New York: Random House, 1982 ISBN 0-394-52197-8
  18. ^ Web page titled "POET Francis Jammes (1868 - 1938)", at The Poetry Foundation website, retrieved August 30, 2009
  19. ^ a b Natarajan, Nalini and Emmanuel Sampath Nelson, editors, Handbook of Twentieth-century Literatures of India, Chapter 11: "Twentieth-Century Telugu Literature" by G. K. Subbarayudu and C. Vijayasree' ', pp 306–328, retrieved via Google Books, January 4, 2008
  20. ^ Natarajan, Nalini, and Emmanuel Sampath Nelson, Handbook of Twentieth-century Literatures of India, Westport, Connecticut, United States: Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996, ISBN 0-313-28778-3, ISBN 978-0-313-28778-7, retrieved via Google Books on June 17, 2009
  21. ^ Mohan, Sarala Jag, Chapter 4: "Twentieth-Century Gujarati Literature" (Google books link), in Natarajan, Nalini, and Emanuel Sampath Nelson, editors, Handbook of Twentieth-century Literatures of India, Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996, ISBN 978-0-313-28778-7, retrieved December 10, 2008
  22. ^ Debicki, Andrew P., Spanish Poetry of the Twentieth Century: Modernity and Beyond, p 11, University Press of Kentucky, 1995, ISBN 978-0-8131-0835-3, retrieved via Google Books, November 21, 2009
  23. ^ "Robinson, Roland (1912–1992)". Australia Dancing. Archived from the original on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-03. 
  24. ^ Davison, Phil, [http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/captain-micky-burn-soldier-who-led-the-commandos-in-the-operation-chariot-raid-on-saint-nazaire-in-1942-2072090.html "Captain Micky Burn: Soldier who led the commandos in the 'Operation Chariot' raid on Saint Nazaire in 1942", obituary, The Independent, September 7, 2010, retrieved October 20, 2010
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h Das, Sisir Kumar and various, History of Indian Literature: 1911–1956: struggle for freedom: triumph and tragedy, Volume 2, 1995, published by Sahitya Akademi, ISBN 978-81-7201-798-9, retrieved via Google Books on December 23, 2008