1916 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1916 throughout the world.  

Woodrow Wilson throws out the ball on opening day.

Champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

MLB statistical leaders[edit]

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Tris Speaker CLE .386 Hal Chase CIN .339
HR Wally Pipp NYY 12 Dave Robertson NYG &
Cy Williams CHC
12
RBI Del Pratt SLB 103 Heinie Zimmerman CHC & NYG 83
Wins Walter Johnson WSH 25 Pete Alexander PHI 33
ERA Babe Ruth BRS 1.75 Pete Alexander PHI 1.55
Ks Walter Johnson WAS 228 Pete Alexander PHI 167

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Boston Red Sox 91 63 0.591 49–28 42–35
Chicago White Sox 89 65 0.578 2 49–28 40–37
Detroit Tigers 87 67 0.565 4 49–28 38–39
New York Yankees 80 74 0.519 11 46–31 34–43
St. Louis Browns 79 75 0.513 12 45–32 34–43
Cleveland Indians 77 77 0.500 14 44–33 33–44
Washington Senators 76 77 0.497 14½ 49–28 27–49
Philadelphia Athletics 36 117 0.235 54½ 23–53 13–64


National League final standings[edit]

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Brooklyn Robins 94 60 0.610 50–27 44–33
Philadelphia Phillies 91 62 0.595 50–29 41–33
Boston Braves 89 63 0.586 4 41–31 48–32
New York Giants 86 66 0.566 7 47–30 39–36
Chicago Cubs 67 86 0.438 26½ 37–41 30–45
Pittsburgh Pirates 65 89 0.422 29 37–40 28–49
St. Louis Cardinals 60 93 0.392 33½ 36–40 24–53
Cincinnati Reds 60 93 0.392 33½ 32–44 28–49


Events[edit]

  • February 7 - The Federal League's year-old suit charging antitrust violations by organized baseball is dismissed by mutual consent in U.S. District Court in Chicago by Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis. No appellate decision is written and it will not be until 1922 when the courts rule on antitrust law.
  • May 9 - The Philadelphia Athletics and the Detroit Tigers combined to set a Major League record with thirty walks during a 16–2, Tigers win. Eighteen walks were issued by the Athletics, who went on to finish the season with 715. Detroit added eleven more the following day for a two-game Major League record of twenty-nine.
  • June 22 - The Boston Braves pulled off a triple steal in the eleventh inning, to defeat the New York Giants, 3–1. It is the only extra-inning triple steal in National League history. In 1941, the American League would match the feat with their only recorded extra-inning triple swipe.
  • June 28 - William Fischer of the Chicago Cubs set a Major League record by catching all twenty-seven innings of a doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Pirates won the first game, which went 9 innings, by a score of 3 - 2, and the second game, which went 18 innings, by the same score.
  • August 29 - Boston Red Sox pitcher Dutch Leonard allowed two runs on two hits, one walk, one hit-by-pitch and a wild pitch, before being relieved during the first inning of a game against the St. Louis Browns. One day later, Leonard pitched a 4–0 no-hitter versus the Browns.
  • October 12 - The Boston Red Sox defeat the Brooklyn Robins, 4–1, in Game 5 of the World Series to win their second consecutive World Championship and fourth overall. Boston's Babe Ruth pitched 13 shutout innings in Game 2, starting a consecutive scoreless innings streak that would reach 29 in the 1918 Series.
  • December 2 - 1916 - Under pressure from the Players League, the National Commission orders that injured players shall get full pay for the duration of their contracts. The injury clause previously let clubs suspend players after 15 days pay.

Births[edit]

January–February[edit]

March–April[edit]

May–June[edit]

July–August[edit]

September–October[edit]

November–December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January–February[edit]

  • January 1 - Jake Drauby, 52, third baseman who hit .206 in ten games for the Washington Senators of the National League in 1892.
  • January 6 - King Cole, 29, pitcher who was 20-4 and led National League in ERA for the 1910 Chicago Cubs; gave up Babe Ruth's first hit in 1914, and inspired Ring Lardner's "Alibi Ike" stories.
  • January 20 - Emmet Heidrick, 39, centerfielder for four teams in the National and American leagues between 1898 and 1908, who collected a .300 average and 186 stolen bases in 757 career games.
  • .300 career hitter.
  • February 4 - Frank Wyman, 53, outfielder for the Kansas City Cowboys and Chicago Browns of the Union Association in 1884.
  • February 5 - Ed Irwin, 34, third baseman who played one game for the 1912 Detroit Tigers of the American League.
  • February 14 - Pat Carroll, 62, Union Association catcher and right fielder for the Altoona Mountain City and the Philadelphia Keystones in the 1884 season.
  • February 25 - Art Allison, 67, outfielder-first baseman who hit .254 for five teams between 1871 and 1876.

March–April[edit]

  • March 4 - Abe Wolstenholme, 55, catcher for the 1883 Philadelphia Quakers of the National League.
  • March 7 - Fred Donovan, 51, catcher for the Cleveland Spiders of the National League in 1895.
  • March 23 - Frank Graves, 55, catcher for the 1886 St. Louis Maroons of the National League.
  • March 28 - Eddie Hohnhorst, 51, first baseman for the Cleveland Naps of the American League in the 1910 and 1912 seasons.
  • April 6 - Fred Mann, 58, centerfielder who hit .262 and scored 388 runs in 577 games for five clubs from 1882 to 1887.
  • April 8 - Bill Moran, 46, National League catcher who hit a .147 average in 39 games with the St. Louis Browns (1892) and the Chicago Colts (1895).
  • April 16 - Jim McTamany, 52, center fielder for four teams from 1885 to 1891, who led the American Association in runs (140) and walks (112) in 1890, while collecting 255 stolen bases and a .371 on-base percentage in 813 career-games.
  • April 26 - Skyrocket Smith, first baseman who hit a .238 average with a .349 on-base percentage for the Louisville Colonels of the American Association in 1888.
  • April 27 - Jul Kustus, 33, outfielder who hit .145 in x games for the 1909 Brooklyn Superbas of the National League.

May–June[edit]

  • May 31 - Bud Sharpe, 34, National League who hit .222 in parts of two seasons for the Boston Beaneaters (1905) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1910).
  • June 10 - Jack Chapman, 73, one of the foremost players of the early 1860s, who became famous for his many long running catches at right field, receiving the colorful nickname ″Death to Flying Things″; later a highly respected manager from 1876 to 1892, winning one championship in 1890 with the Louisville Colonels of the American Association.
  • June 19 - John Dodge, 27, National League third baseman for the 1912 Philadelphia Phillies and the 1913 Cincinnati Reds, who died after being hit in the head by a pitch during a minor league game.

July–August[edit]

  • July 15 - Ira Belden, 42, American Association outfielder for the Cleveland Spiders in 1897.
  • July 22 - George Ziegler, 44[?], who pitched one game for the 1890 Pittsburg Alleghenys of the National League.
  • August 15 - John Dyler, 64, left fielder for the Louisville Eclipse American Association team in 1882.
  • August 23 - Bill George, 51, pitcher/outfielder who played from 1887 through 1889 for the New York Giants (National League) and Columbus Solons (American Association).

September–October[edit]

  • September 1 - Ben Froelich, 29, catcher who played one game for the 1909 Philadelphia Phillies of the National League.
  • September 2 - Chick Evans, 26, National League pitcher who posted a 1-4 record and a 4.96 ERA in 17 games for the Boston Doves in the 1909 and 1910 seasons, who also hurled a perfect game in the minors ih which not a single batter hit a ball out of the infield.
  • September 23 - Monk Cline, 58, American Association outfielder who hit .261 in 232 games with the Baltimore Orioles, Kansas City Cowboys and the Louisville Eclipse/Colonels between 1882 and 1891.
  • October 10 - Dick McBride, 71, pitcher-manager for the Philadelphia Athletics of the National Association from 1871 to 1875, who also played for the 1876 Boston Red Caps of the National League.
  • October 11 - Henry Luff, 64, infielder/outfielder/pitcher who played between 1875 and 1884 for six clubs in four different leagues.
  • October 13 - Cyclone Miller, 57, pitcher who posted a 14-11 record and a 3.04 ERA in 27 games with four teams in the 1884 and 1886 seasons.
  • October 16 - Henry Killeen, 44, pitcher for the 1891 Cleveland Spiders of the National League.
  • October 24 - Hi Ebright, 57, catcher who hit .254 for the Washington Senators of the National League in 1889.
  • October 31 - Nicholas Young, 76, president of the National League (1885–1902) and league secretary (1876–1902), who also managed the Washington team in the National Association and umpired in that league.

November–December[edit]

  • November 12 - Mike Roach, 46, catcher for the 1899 Washington Senators of the National League.
  • November 12 - Will Foley, 60, third baseman who played between 1875 and 1884 for five clubs in three different leagues.
  • November 15 - Jack Farrell 60, center fielder who hit .385 in three games with the 1874 Hartford Dark Blues of the National Association.
  • November 29 - Bob Unglaub, 35, American League infielder for the New York Highlanders, Boston Americans and Washington Senators between 1904 and 1910, who also managed the Americans in the 1907 season.
  • December 3 - Reddy Mack, 50, Irish second baseman who played in the American Association for the Louisville Colonels (1886-'88) and Baltimore Orioles (1889-'90).
  • December 5 - John Cuff, 52, catcher for the 1884 Baltimore Monumentals of the Union Association.
  • December 17 - Scoops Carey, 46, a .271 career-hitter with four clubs, who led first basemen in fielding average in both the National League (1895) and American League (1902).
  • December 17 - Elias Peak, 57, second baseman who hit a combined .202 average with the Boston Reds and Philadelphia Keystones in the 1884 season.
  • December 19 - Doug Allison, 70, catcher who played from 1868 through 1883 for ten different teams, including for the undefeated 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings, who is the earliest known player to use a glove, when he donned buckskin mittens to protect his hands in 1870.
  • December 19 - John McGuinness, 60[?], Irish first baseman and a .244 career hitter in 162 games with the New York Mutuals (1876), Syracuse Stars (1879), and Philadelphia Keystones (1884).
  • December 23 - Erve Beck, 38, second baseman for four different teams in the American and National Leagues between 1899 and 1902.
  • December 23 - Howard Earl, 47, outfielder who hit .248 with eight homers and 68 RBI for the 1890 Chicago Colts and the 1890 Milwaukee Brewers.
  • December 25 - Bill Moriarty, 33, backup shortstop for the 1909 Cincinnati Reds.
  • December 29 - Ed Doheny, 43, pitcher who played from 1895 through 1903 for the New York Giants and Pittsburgh Pirates, compiling a 75-83 and a 3.73 ERA in 75 games, while allowing only 13 home runs in 1405 innings for a .083 HR/9 average, 16th on all-time list.