1920 in science

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The year 1920 in science and technology involved some significant events, listed below.

Astronomy[edit]

Biology[edit]

History of science and technology[edit]

Medicine[edit]

Meteorology[edit]

Physics[edit]

Psychology[edit]

Technology[edit]

Events[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michelson, Albert Abraham; Pease, Francis G. (1921). "Measurement of the diameter of alpha Orionis with the interferometer". Astrophysical Journal (PDF) 53: 249–59. Bibcode:1921ApJ....53..249M. doi:10.1086/142603. 
  2. ^ Mannich, C.; Löwenheim, Helene (1920). "Ueber zwei neue Reduktionsprodukte des Kodeins". Archiv der Pharmazie 258: 295–316. doi:10.1002/ardp.19202580218. 
  3. ^ Théorie mathématique des phénomènes thermiques produits par la radiation solaire (Paris).
  4. ^ Dyson, F.W.; Eddington, A.S.; Davidson, C.R. (1920). "A Determination of the Deflection of Light by the Sun's Gravitational Field, from Observations Made at the Solar eclipse of May 29, 1919". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Physical, Mathematical and Engineering Sciences 220 (571-581): 291–333. Bibcode:1920RSPTA.220..291D. doi:10.1098/rsta.1920.0009. 
  5. ^ "The Phenomenon of Rupture and Flow in Solids". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A221: 163–98. February 1920. JSTOR 91192. 
  6. ^ "What happened on July 25". Dates in History. Retrieved 2012-01-09. 
  7. ^ Glinsky, Albert (2000). Theremin: Ether Music and Espionage. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. p. 26. ISBN 0-252-02582-2. Retrieved 2012-01-09. 
  8. ^ Asimov, Isaac (September 1979). "The Vocabulary of Science Fiction". Asimov's Science Fiction. 
  9. ^ Zunt, Dominik (2004). "Who did actually invent the word "robot" and what does it mean?". Karel Čapek (1890-1938). Retrieved 2011-12-06.